How Designer Marcelo Burlon County of Milan Developed A Mature Collaboration With Muhammad Ali

Marcelo Burlon  photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Whether drawn by splendid designs or heartfelt recollections, or the curiosity of what will be the next big thing, streetwear has  proudly proven its sustainability in a volatile fashion marketplace. Make no bones about it, streetwear is meant to be enjoyed and experienced in the proper fashion. Rich textures and hues mesmerize the consumers with waves of exotic yet familiar styles. Streetwear is street fashion that saw its humble beginnings take root in California’s surf and skate culture. Since then, it has grown to encompass elements of hip-hop fashion, Japanese street fashion, and lately modern haute couture fashion. Streetwear more than often centers on more relaxed pieces such as jeans, baseball caps, hoodies and sneakers.

Nevertheless, let me be clear; streetwear was born in the USA. Throughout history, the USA has played a significantly creative role in fashion and quite often we don’t give ourselves a good pat on the back for our creative developments on fashions timeline of history. The movement is born out of the Los Angeles surf culture of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Even if we look as legendary surfboard designer Shawn Stussy, you’ll find that he began selling printed T-shirts featuring the same trademark signature he used on his custom surfboards. At first, he was selling the Stussy items from his own car. Soon thereafter he expanded sales to boutiques once popularity has increased and Stussy had become a household name. To be clear, the two most important components of streetwear is T-shirts and exclusivity. Early streetwear brands took inspiration from the DIY aesthetic of punk, new wave, heavy metal and later hip hop cultures. Subsequently. well-known sportswear and fashion brands attached themselves to the emerging early 1980s hip hop scene such as Kangol and Adidas. At this point, the game just got interesting. Nike’s signing of soon-to-be basketball superstar Michael Jordan from their  rival Adidas in 1984 changed the game altogether, as Nike now dominated the urban streetwear sneaker market in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Moving forward, we witnessed brand launches by the chief executives of major record companies with then heavyweights Russell Simmons of Def Jam launching his Phat Farm label, Sean Combs of Bad Boy with Sean John, and Jay-Z and Damon Dash of Roc-a-Fella Records launching Rocawear.  Years later, even rap superstar 50 Cent launched his G-Unit clothing label, with the sneaker rights given to Reebok.  This simply meant that the big fashion companies not only  saw a future in streetwear but rather  embraced the streetwear culture. So where does this leave streetwear now? Recently, we find an increase in established luxury brands entering into the market. Last year, Louis Vuitton proudly named Virgil Abloh (Off-White brand) as the brand menswear creative director. So then, what really popularized the streetwear trend? In a word, the decline of formal wear led to the rise of streetwear fashion. I recently reviewed a streetwear designer brand that peaked my interest.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Marcelo Burlon was born in Argentinia. His approach to fashion has caught the attention of new generations on his very own rainbow tour of the social-media era. Moving with his parents to Porto Potenza Picena in Italy at 14, he would become a notorious club kid in Rimini. That was until a career organizing events for major fashion houses and DJ-ing relocated him to Milan in 2012 and paved the way for the launch of his streetwear brand Marcelo Burlon County of Milan. Five years on, he has become a fan phenomenon in Italy and beyond, and the poster boy for a new wave of fashion entrepreneurs who are set on challenging the establishment.

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Meghan Markle Steals The Royal Show With Her Glamorous Maternity Fashion Style

Meghan and Harry visit Courtnay Creative for an event celebrating the city’s thriving arts scene in Wellington, New Zealand         Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage

Pregnant and radiant, with her winning smile, intelligence and down-to-earth warmth, Meghan Markle has been unquestionably the star of the first official extended overseas royal trip she and Prince Harry are taking for 16 days to cities in Australia, Fiji, Tonga and New Zealand.

According to the local press, she has taken the region by storm and the talk is about ‘Meghan Mania,”  her popularity among the public and in particular the young women and children with whom they come in contact, her influence on the fashion industry that follows her every sartorial choice and the almost immediate effect her taste has on the fashion houses she chooses to wear.

Meghan visits Courtnay Creative for an event celebrating the city’s thriving arts scene in Wellington. Considered one of the best looks of the tour, this white tuxedo dress with adjustable buttons by New Zealand-based designer Maggie Marilyn was custom-made for Meghan. The blue shoes are Manolo Blahnik    Photo: Samir Hussein/WireImage

Glowing naturally as pregnant women do during their second trimester, Meghan has looked stunning in each of the many outfits she brought for the trip,  from a mini tuxedo white dress she chose for a cultural event that has been praised to the moon by fashionistas, to the spectacular Oscar de la Renta princess gown she wore for the Australian Geographical Society Awards and all the formal and informal stylish looks in between, including beach wear, city chic, sporty gear, ballgowns and environmentally-responsible  jeans.

“Australian designers get a taste of the ‘Meghan Effect’ after the Duchess of Sussex championed a spate of local names during the royal tour,” WWD wrote in an article about “Meghan Mania” sweeping Australia, and the fact that she included a number of local labels in her tour wardrobe, “alongside international brands as Brandon Maxwell, Jason Wu, Roksanda Ilincic, Stuart Weitzman, Manolo Blahnik, Gucci and Birks.”

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Q&A With Paris-Based Singaporean Fashion Designer, Andrew Gn

Andrew Gn, the only Singaporean fashion designer on the official Paris Fashion Week calendar speaks about how the industry has evolved over the past three decades.

Singaporean fashion designer Andrew GnPhoto Anne Combaz

In your opinion, how has the fashion industry evolved over the past three decades since you first started in the business?

When I started, fast fashion had not become the mass phenomenon it is now. With their strategies of continuously offering new styles in order to attract customers more frequently into their stores, these new actors have commanded a change of pace in the industry, more collections, a much higher turnover of designs, and probably some market saturation and customer fatigue. Another significant change has been the ever-increasing role of social media, spreading looks and trends around the globe like wildfire, thus pushing true designers to fight for their own identity. And lastly, the interconnection of fashion and show business, with showbiz stars becoming promotional vehicles for fashion, or even turning themselves into fashion designers, with varying degrees of success.

Although Singapore isn’t known for its fashion scene, how have you created an international fashion brand that’s worn by high-profile celebrities? What were the keys to your success, and what were some of the preconceived notions about Asian fashion designers that you’ve had to overcome?

From the beginning, I’ve not been designing with a specific geographical market in mind, but for any woman around the world who loved beauty and refinement. This is why my house has grown a very international clientele, attracting celebrities and their stylists from the West as well as the East. I don’t feel that I was ever perceived as an “Asian” designer, but more as a Singapore-born designer who chose to establish himself in the West.

Why have you chosen to be based in Paris, and why would fashion designers choose to be based overseas versus in Singapore and vice versa?

I first came to Paris as a young boy. I was so enthralled by the city that I told myself that someday I would live there. I came back to Paris after my fashion studies in London, New York and Milan to take my first job with Emmanuel Ungaro. And I’ve stayed on because I believe Paris does remain the fashion capital of the world. Here I can find the talent, resources and savoir-faire to produce my collections with the degree of refinement I’ve always been yearning for.

Describe to me your sources of inspiration, especially history, art and nature, and how that has influenced your work. Do other fashion designers use similar inspiration?

I can’t really speak for others, but for me, art, history, nature and flowers are (besides food!) major passions. When I turned 15, my father gave me a complete set of Les Histoires Naturelles by 18th-century French naturalist Buffon. I treasure these books, they have inspired me on several occasions. I love visiting museums and art exhibitions, whether classic or contemporary. I am an avid collector of ceramics and textiles. All this, plus a profuse image library within my head, are my sources of inspiration.

Why is it important for you to draw from your Asian roots and heritage in your collections?

I was born and educated in Asia. My Asian heritage comes naturally in my designs. My father was a merchant and was traveling a lot around Southeast Asia when I was a child. He would bring back for my mother wonderful hand-dyed batiks from Indonesia, beautifully woven and embroidered kimonos from Japan and amazing silks from China. My mother would then go to her tailor and have them transformed into dresses, suits and cheongsams. These childhood memories are still very vivid and bring me constant inspiration, as you can see from some of my very recent collections.

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How This Former Fashion Exec Changed Her Career With A Baby In Tow

Miles and Milan founder, Shennel FullerMiles and Milan

For this former retail executive, becoming an entrepreneur was the realization of a life-long dream. But it wasn’t until the birth of her first son that Shennel Fuller decided to create her own children’s clothing line, Miles and Milan.

And according to TendLab CEO and Co-founder, Amy Henderson, there is no better time to make this decision:

…any parent who leaves their child to go to work—whether it’s a choice or financial necessity—must grapple with the distance it creates. There are times when we want to be with them, and we can’t be. And this forces us to question what we are doing, and why we are doing it. Answering this question forges us, like steel in molten fire, into stronger, more motivated versions of our former selves.

Like other successful entrepreneurs who leave the corporate world beyond, Fuller followed the fire in her belly and refused to take no for an answer. Her tenacity and fortitude were inherited; as she is the daughter of hard-working immigrant parents who instilled in her, an unparalleled work ethic.

With the support of her husband, parents and sister, this founder charted her own course to becoming an entrepreneur and hopes to inspire other women to do the same.

Fuller: My entrepreneurial journey started three years ago after my first son, Jackson was born. My background is corporate, and I’ve held a few executive positions. I was teetering and trying to figure out if I wanted to go back. I was always a very dedicated and hard worker. But now my hard work was focused on keeping this baby alive. I was trying to figure out how I could feel the most fulfilled. I wanted to be doing what I was most passionate about. I knew it was retail and fashion, so I wanted to continue being immersed in that world, while also having the flexibility of being with my son and not missing any milestones.

For a while, I did some consulting. I was helping a major corporation by revamping their whole retail strategy. I loved the freedom of consulting; the flexibility, being my boss, managing my schedule and being able to live in both worlds (motherhood and fashion). I would bring my son to my business meetings. My work was still getting done, so I kind of shifted the narrative. I felt like if I’m going to be giving you great ideas, and developing your strategy, I can also be rocking my son at the same time if he needs me.  Which made me think, not only could I be consulting more but I can take it a step further. My dream was always to have my clothing line, and that’s pretty much the reason why I got into buying and working for those corporate companies, to begin with.

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What are the best accessories to go with your Philips Hue Bloom?

The Philips Hue Bloom is an ambient lighting lamp from Philips that works with the Hue ecosystem. It’s capable of providing ambient light up to 120 lumens, can be fine-tuned from a color palette of over 16 million hues, and is easy to move around (though not as portable as the Hue Go). However, to get the most out of the Hue Bloom, you may want to pick up a few accessories to go along with it. Here are some of the best options to consider!.

[“source=ndtv”]

2019 Maruti Ertiga Accessories List With Prices Revealed

15 accessories are made available in 2 packages and 17 other accessories for all 10 variants of the Ertiga.

2019 Ertiga Ambitious Package Accessories
These accessories will give buyers of the lower trim vehicles a premium feel

The much-awaited Ertiga was launched by Maruti on Saturday, November 21 2018. The MPV which is available in 10 variants (two engine and gearbox options) is expected to capture the affordable MPV market. Both engine options are equipped with Maruti’s SHVS technology to improve fuel efficiency.

Now, in a recent announcement, Maruti released the list of accessories available to the Ertiga. The vehicle already comes fully equipped but now buyers can add elements to the vehicle that match their personal taste. The accessories are divided into two packages – Ambitious and Indulge. The packages contain predefined interior and exterior accessories for the MPV. The third package consists the standard additional accessories that the manufacturer provides.

Some of the accessories include alloy wheels, interior wood trims, upgraded infotainment systems and parking camera. These accessories will allow customers of the lower-priced variants to get the top-spec variant features. The range topping variant already comes with most of these features.

2019 Maruti Ertiga Accessories

– 32 accessories in two packages – Ambitious, Indulge and other accessories
– Prices range from Rs. 350/- to Rs. 33,660/-
– Available for all 10 variants of the MPV

2019 Ertiga Indulge Package Accessories
The vehicle is already loaded with features, but the accessories will add more to it
2019 Ertiga Other Accessories

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