Saris Among Indian Ensembles Celebrated on Runway During ‘Lotus Makeup India Fashion Week’

saris

NEW DELHI — It’s fashion season in India’s capital, with the country’s top designers showcasing their latest collections to lure the rapidly growing domestic and export markets for Indian haute couture.

Before the styles debut on the runway lie days of planning, fittings and hair and makeup sessions to experiment with looks, poses and choreography. Just days ahead of the big show, tailors take models’ measurements and fashion designers finish rehearsing.

Top fashion names and models participated in Lotus Makeup India Fashion Week organized by the Fashion Design Council of India earlier this month.

The show celebrated the sari, Indian women’s most idiosyncratic garment, 6 yards of fabric that symbolize a centuries-old tradition.

“As a long piece of fabric, it’s not easy to drape, a lot of designers have worked on it over time and it is being styled differently to inspire the younger generation to wear,” Vaishali S., a Mumbai-based designer, said of the sari.

Models sashayed down the runway in a riot of color and glitz as Delhi socialites, Bollywood stars and prospective buyers watched for the season’s next “it” items.

The sari was juxtaposed with other Indian ensembles, Western wear and fusion clothing collections for men and women.

The show finale was an ode to the sari, worn by the runway models in modern, reconstructed forms, along with elaborate jewelry and accessories against striking backdrops.

Vaishali said the saris on the runway paid tribute to the great variety across India of “weaves, textures, drapes and fabrics with every state and every village having its own strongly distinct and contemporary style, alive and evolving.”

At the end, avid fashionistas in the audience blended in with fashion models as buyers thronged the stalls of designers, who offered their creations for sale, pret-a-porter.

[“source=indiawest”]

Hopscotch India Presents First Ever Kids Fashion Show At Bombay Times Fashion Week

Mumbai:  India’s fastest growing kids fashion brand Hopscotch made a stylish debut at the Bombay Times Fashion Week this weekend. As a delightful twist to the fashion-packed extravaganza at the St. Regis Mumbai, Hopscotch stole the show with its refreshing Summer ’19 collection. This first ever kids fashion showcase at BTFW saw kids adorn the ramp with three Hopscotch summer ready ranges/sets, namely Street Style, Put-Together Casual Pret and the celebration forward Party Range. Launching about 500 new styles daily on their website, Hopscotch is trailblazing the Indian kids fashion space by offering the latest trends at an unbeatable value.

Hopscotch’s Summer ’19 collection looked promising and playful. Mini fashionistas walked the ramp in their comfy, trendy and playful fashion looks. Each look was uber stylish and fit for all occasions, be it a beach day, an evening garden party, a road trip or playing out in the sun. Boxed in 3 mini sets, the Hopscotch Summer ’19 collection had  ‘Street Style’ apparels that had snug track pants, hoodies & jackets for an ideal summer party. Next in line was the ‘Put-Together Casual Pret’ set, which comprised of classic separates that can be mixed-matched and customized to the occasion. This set had some chic styles with cool summer cotton dresses in floral & fruity prints along with checkered shirts and typo tees. The finale felt like a beautiful celebration as the little ones gracefully walked the ramp in their beautiful party dresses, tuxedo jackets & suits.

 

A Hopscotch spokesperson said “At Hopscotch, it is our constant endeavour to innovate and deliver the best of kids fashion from the world to Indian mothers. We strongly believe that our wide range of styles and the unbeatable price points make us the first choice of Indian parents when it comes to kids fashion. Our  summer collection’19 is a well curated, fun-loving, free spirited and a trendy range with a splash of vibrant colours. With the launch of this collection, our aim is to make every moment a stylish #HopscotchMoment”.

The kids’ fashion market is expected to reach $14B by 2022. Hopscotch leads the kids fashion space by providing customers with an unbeatable value proposition. They launch 300x more styles than traditional retailers, which is 120,000 styles per year – offering consumers abundant variety coupled with the latest trends in kids fashion. Staying ahead of its game in the kids fashion space, Hopscotch is the first kids brand to have partnered with the Bombay Times Fashion Week.

[“source=apnnews”]

Meet Fashion Designer Şansım Adalı Of Sudi Etuz At Her Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi Debut

Şansım Adalı of Sudi Etuz and models in the collection after her show.Courtesy of Mercdes-Benz.

A big challenge for emerging fashion designers is to show their collection abroad, and the Mercedes-Benz International Design Exchange Program allows for many to do that. Turkish fashion designer Şansım Adalı traveled to Georgia, where she presented her label Sudi Etuz internationally for the first time as part of the Mercedes-Benz International Designer Exchange Program

(IDEP) during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi. The designer’s Spring/Summer 2019 was a love letter to Istanbul, with references to the city through its geography and opulent buildings. Bulbous sleeves were shaped like Palace doors, while the decolletage of a bandeau top traced the outlines of the famed Bosphorus Strait that links Asia to Europe. Delicate ruffles and swathes of tulle gave the collection and ethereal touch, ideal for that staid woman who lunches, and the fun, young debutante alike. Adalı spoke to a group of reporters after her show, where she discussed her first time traveling abroad, her ode to Istanbul, and the challenges of being an emerging designer.

How did you get the opportunity to present at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi?

Last season I was presented by Mercedes-Benz in my hometown, Istanbul, and they gave me a chance to do an exchange program. There was a list of some cities in which Tbilisi took my attention because the emerging designers are so cool. Fashion week goes really well. I really wanted to be a part of it, and thanks to Mercedes, they just placed me here, and replaced me with a Georgian designer, and the experience improved me a lot because I’m out of my country for the first time, so it was a really great experience to be a part of it, and working with Georgian models and a Georgian team.

Turkey shares a border with Georgia. Is there a strong connection between countries?

Yeah we do. We don’t even need passports to fly. We’re just neighbors. We’re so close.

Were you exposed Georgian culture growing up?

In Istanbul I have some Georgian friends, and my teacher from fashion school was Georgian, so she was telling me stylist friends who are visiting Tbilisi Fashion Week, they are always telling me a lot about it, like how cool the places are, and how the street style so good, and how international press is giving much attention, and the city is inspiring. I didn’t expect this much. They preserved all the buildings, everything really good, and inspired me. Being in the city gave me so much inspiration.

[“source=forbes]

The Making of Georgian Fashion Moment: Tbilisi Fashion Week

From those tiny sunglasses seen on just about every celebrity to cover-rocking distressed denim outfits, Georgian designers have been setting major micro-trends lately. How big is Georgian fashion right now? Well, Tbilisi features two fashion weeks to accommodate its growing number of designers wanting to present to the international visiting crowds of press, buyers, and influencers. We start our series on emerging Georgian fashion industry with the 18th edition of Tbilisi Fashion Week.

Tako Chkheidze (center) with Georgian actresses Irinka Kavsadze (the granddaughter of the Bela Mirianshvili) and Gogola Kalandadze.Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Dedicated to the beloved 1960’s Georgian actress Bela Mirianashvili, the grand opening took place high above the city at the spectacular terraces of the Funicular restaurant. Guests were greeted by models in modest monochrome dresses evoking nostalgia for a bygone era of cinema and a slower pace of pre-digital life. Fashion week founder Tako Chkheidze spoke eloquently about art and fashion not as perpetually transient frenetic trends, but as cultural forces leaving a lasting influence. By choosing to dedicate the events to a style icon from a period of Soviet censorship and scarcity, organizers highlighted the creative spirit that has always prevailed in Georgia! Such an intro was perfect for the week’s agenda focused on eco fashion.

Éthéré Accessoire presentation at the GhvinisUbani art spaceCourtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

The spring-summer 2019 collections were presented at the Ghvinis Ubani, a former Wine Factory turned multifunctional arts space, with several noteworthy locations such as the Museum of Modern Art and Chaikana Bazar serving as additional stages. In place of the conventional catwalk the runway was converted in an attractive pasture of synthetic grass to highlight the theme: “We must take care of nature.” Designer Lasha Jokhadze opened the show with an unusual theatrical presentation of his sophisticated all-black evening wear collection. His models were arranged lying down and as the music started, they helped each other rise to their feet and walked around hand-in-hand.

Lasha Jokhadze S/S 2019Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Designer Tatia Korsava was a winner of the Tbilisi Fashion Week talent competition last season with a menswear debut inspired by medieval arts and neo-expressionist motifs in paintings by Merab Abramishvili. She made a strong highly-anticipated comeback with a post-apocalyptic collection reflecting modern ecological threats. Models wore protective trench coats, rubber suits, military jumpsuits and gas masks. Korsava playfully challenged gender norms, pairing ragged menswear with feminine glossy pleather waist-cinching bodices, bird-print silk blouses, and see-through mesh shirts.

Tatia Korsava S/S 2019Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Another gender-bending twist on proportions and silhouette came from the Russian brand 1377. It re-conceptualized menswear staples with inclusion of mixed textures and elements typically reserved for women or children: flower appliques, flowing capes, and lurex tights. Even the lapti¸ the quintessential Russian peasant tree bark shoes, felt authentic in this well-thought-out presentation.

[“source=forbes]