M&S’ £50 summer shoes that sold out in just THREE hours are finally back in stock (but they’re already being snapped up so you’ll have to act fast)

A pair of M&S shoes that sold out in just three hours are back in stock.

The Fran, designed around a statement bow, proved a hit with shoppers and disappeared from shelves in just three hours when they were first introduced back in February.

The stylish pair of shoes was born from a M&S collaboration with influencer Fran Bacon from Instagram account Fashion Lift.

But act fast if you want to snatch a pair – the shoes are already selling out and have been snapped up in almost every size online, from size three to seven.

They're back! M&S restocked The Fran, its popular spring shoe designed by Fran Bacon of the Fashion Liff

They’re back! M&S restocked The Fran, its popular spring shoe designed by Fran Bacon of the Fashion Liff

The brand announced the Fran’s triumphant return on its Instagram page this morning.

The post read: ‘Sound the klaxon, our sell out Fran shoes from our “The Collective” shoe collection are back in stock.’

‘They sold out when they launched and by popular demand we have bought them back.’

A spokesperson for M&S told Mailonline that the shoes would also come back to ten selected stores across the UK too due to their popularity.

The £49.50 shoe (pictured) sold out in just three hours when it was first released back in February

The £49.50 shoe (pictured) sold out in just three hours when it was first released back in February

But online, some customers struck out while trying to get their hands on the Fran.

One wrote: ‘Added to bag, get to checkout to be told out of stock.’

‘I’m so disappointed that I’ve missed out again, when I went on ten minutes after you posted,’ regretted another.

The £49.50 feminine courts, released next month, are designed around a beautiful statement bow at the tow and boast a soft – and highly wearable – colour palette of nude and pink.

‘These court shoes will provide a feminine and stylish addition to your footwear collection,’ reads the M&S website.

The leather shoes (pictured) are adorned with a statement bow, in pink or nude, and a delicate ankle strap

The leather shoes (pictured) are adorned with a statement bow, in pink or nude, and a delicate ankle strap

The shoes are designed to be as comfortable as pretty, with their special sole built into the design.’ The Fran is part of The Footwear Collective, where social media stars design their own dream footwear for M&S.

The Instagram star styled hers with a pair of torn blue denim jeans and a sumptuously soft dusty rose velvet bag.

‘I love how feminine they feel,’ Fran said upon their initial release. ‘It was important that they represented my personality, and I think it has been captured so well.

Fans of the shoes tried to get their hands of a pair, but the item is already selling fast on the brand's website

Fans of the shoes tried to get their hands of a pair, but the item is already selling fast on the brand’s website

‘The neutral colours mean they can be worn with anything, dressed up or dressed down. I’ll be wearing ‘The Fran’ all summer,’ she added.

The high street stalwart unveiled its Footwear collective back in February.  They collaborated with seven stylish Instagrammers, who boast a combined following of more than 700,000 fans.

The women, all based in the UK, each designed their own shoe to reflect their personal style, whether it be a playful slide, statement heel or sporty sandal.

[“source=dailymail”]

Three Ethical Retailers For Your Next Sustainable Fashion Purchase

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brands such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

YOU MAY ALSO LIKE

Gather & See understands that, and the store allows its customers to shop by their priority.

Not only can people filter its products by type or designer, but they can also select them by choosing one of the retailer’s five founding philosophies: fair trade, organic, eco-friendly, small scale production and heritage.

Gather & See adapts to each shopper’s ethical priority.Photo: Gather&See

The shop stocks clothing, accessories and jewelry that fits every budget, from affordable fashion to luxury, targeting the fashion-savvy, ethically-minded customer.

Gather & See is a relatively new retailer, founded four years ago by two fashionable women who were fed up of feeling disconnected from the production process.

Now, they ensure each of the more than 40 designers featured on their site produces clothing that fits into at least two of Gather & See’s philosophies. For them, it’s just as much about the ethics as the aesthetics.

People Tree

Founded 27 years ago, People Tree is one of the most well-established ethical retailers around. The shop’s mission is simple: to be 100% fair trade throughout their supply chain.

But what does “fair trade” mean? It’s a way of doing business that guarantees workers aren’t discriminated against. They are provided with good working conditions, their rights are protected, and they are paid sustainable prices for their products.

That means People Tree’s wide range of women’s fashion, that offers everything from cozy knitted jumpers to party dresses, is created by workers in the developing world who are treated well and not exploited.

People Tree is 100% fair trade throughout their supply chain.Photo: People Tree

Not only does People Tree strive for its stock to be ethically-sourced, but it’s also aware of the environmental impact of fashion.

You can trust that its clothing is all made with organic cotton and other sustainable materials, and colored using safe dyes. Even better, as many of its products as possible are shipped by sea, in order to reduce the retailers’ contribution to global warming.

[“source=forbes]