This designer creates shape-shifting cabinets

Image result for This designer creates shape-shifting cabinetsThis designer creates shape-shifting cabinets.

Sebastian: I think art and design are two different disciplines. If you create art that incorporates a certain degree of functionality or design that incorporates these more emotional components, then hopefully you’re enriching both disciplines in parallel.

Sebastian: Hi, my name is Sebastian ErraZuriz, and we’re at R & Company. It’s a design gallery based in New York City.

The cabinet series is called “Breaking the Box.” It’s full of pieces that spin, rotate, transform, and shine.

Sebastian: This box is called “Magistral,” and it’s made from 10,000 corn dog skewers. This one needed to look like either a hedgehog or some sort of protecting fur, so that it would seem like it was protecting your belongings.

He’s been building these kinetic pieces for the past four years. After showing the cabinets in small settings, he shared a video of one on Vimeo in 2015.

Sebastian: We made this very crude video, probably with my phone. We posted the video online, and the video had sound. You could hear the ‘tick tick tick tick’ of all the pieces moving together, each one pulling each other. And we immediately had requests from all sorts of press that they wanted this video. And then everyone on social media wanted the video. And that was the first time that I realized I was onto something.

But it’s not an entirely new concept. These kinds of moving pieces have been around for centuries. In the 1990s, transforming furniture played a big role in mid-century modern design.

Sofa Bathtub.

Piano Bed.

The pieces can serve multiple purposes, hide secret compartments, or save space.

“The Piano Shelf” was the first piece he created for this functional art series. The “keys” are all movable. They’re each long enough to fit large books or sculptures, and they’re thick enough to eliminate bookends.

Sebastian: Finally, the gaps in between are quite aesthetical but really you won’t have a book that’s thin enough to fall through them. So more or less, everything obeys logic as opposed to aesthetics.

He sees a box as an object to be broken out of.

Sebastian: And I believe if we can constantly revisit the idea of the box and break it down in a variety of different formulas, we’re always inviting the audience to understand that whatever your constraints are, there is always a way to hack them.

[“source=thisisinsider”]

Weather: England records its coldest night this winter

Walkers on a snow-covered Beachy Head near Eastbourne

Walkers on a snow-covered Beachy Head near Eastbourne. Photograph: Ed Brown/Alamy

England has seen its coldest night of the winter so far as temperatures tumbled across the UK. A low of -10.9C (12.4F) was recorded at Chillingham Barns in Northumberland in the early hours of Sunday morning, the Met Office said.

In Scotland a low of -12.6C (9.3F) was seen at Braemar in the Highlands, although it was a few degrees off the -15.4C seen there on Thursday. Elsewhere on Sunday morning the coldest spot in Wales was at Swyddffynnon in Dyfed, where -6.5C (20.3F) was seen, while in Northern Ireland the lowest temperature recorded was -2.6C (27.3F) in Katesbridge, Co Down.

Forecasters earlier said there was the potential for a low of minus 16C (3.2F) to be seen in eastern Scotland overnight following a blast of cold weather than brought severe disruption to large parts of the country.

Several weather warnings have been issued for Sunday and Monday mornings, although some respite is expected with milder conditions moving in at the start of the week. Icy stretches will continue to be a hazard in parts of southern England and East Anglia into Sunday morning and a yellow warning is in place until 11am. A warning remained in place for snow and ice for a swathe of western Scotland reaching from Inverness in the north to the outskirts of Glasgow in the south.

“Much of the UK’s dry, but across the north-west and west of Scotland there are some snow showers,” Met Office meteorologist Greg Dewhurst said. “There is a weather warning that will be in place from 7am onward as that band pushes eastwards.

“It will be a cold, frosty start for many and then there is the risk of some more rain, sleet and snow coming into western Scotland by the end of the night into Monday morning.”

After snow left travellers stranded in many parts of Britain, people across the country struggled to get back to normal on Saturday with drivers returning to collect cars they had been forced to abandon at the roadside during the snowfall – up to 14cm deep in some places – while workmen were clearing roads of ice, snow and debris.

Dozens of football, rugby and hockey matches were postponed as a result of snow and icy grounds, with Accrington Stanley’s League One game against Blackpool the most high-profile casualty.

At the Jamaica Inn, off the A30 near Launceston in Cornwall, where 140 people had camped out on mattresses on Thursday night, staff made preparations in case Sunday night brought more disruption.

Sammy Wheeler, the general manager of the inn, said: “We’ve still got the beds out and we’ve told the Highways Agency we’re on standby, ready if they need us. But, thankfully, last night all the roads seemed to be moving.”

A toboggan steers down Gold Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on Saturday.
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A toboggan steers down Gold Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset, on Saturday. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters

Workers from the Highways Agency and local authorities had cleared all main roads by mid-morning on Saturday, but there were still big clear-up efforts in some places.

In Walderslade, Kent, workers used diggers to remove branches and trees that had fallen due to the weight of snow. Kent police said it had been an “incredibly busy night … trying our hardest to move stranded vehicles”.

Several police forces were dealing with the aftermath of collisions. In Thornaby, Teesside, a car smashed through the front wall of a house after skidding off the road on Friday night.

The M3 had been blocked when three lorries came to a halt, and on Saturday snowploughs and gritters cleared snow from all lanes.

Coastal areas saw sleet and rain, with snow showers further inland on Saturday morning, but by the afternoon most of the country was bathed in frosty sunshine.

On Monday there will be more snow and ice in much of Scotland, the Met Office has said.

[“source=theguardian”]

From blue hair to garment bags: this week’s fashion trends

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

Lady Gaga
 Blunette Lady Gaga. Photograph: Getty Images

Going up

Blunettes From Lady Gaga to Kylie Jenner, blue hair is everywhere.

Resentment Harness your negativity for a better life, says Sophie Hannah, author of How To Hold A Grudge.

Quinotto That’s quinoa risotto, of course.

Cultural altars Visionary fashion designer Grace Wales Bonner’s debut exhibition features an “assemblage of shrines” by notable artists, just opened at the Serpentine Gallery.

Grace Wales Bonner.
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 Shrine on: Grace Wales Bonner. Photograph: Alamy

Garment bags The new bumbags, according to Vogue. See Gucci, Alexander Wang and, er, your local dry cleaner.

Pizza wheel eyeliner Forget fiddly pens; rollers promise to fulfil all cat-eyed ambitions.

Going down

Olivia Pope There’s a new fixer in town. See Trinity Sommer in Dogs Of Berlin. A black patent mac and matching suitcase are the new white trouser suit.

Rhinoplasty Non-invasive “tweakments” are becoming more popular as cosmetic surgery fans opt for “lunch-break” procedures.

Gap yah string bracelets Bangles are back, according to Chrissy Teigen’s stylist, who recommends a layered approach.

H20 Waterless beauty is set to take over the skincare market this year, as manufacturers step away from the tap.

Pastels Wear neon green to boost your mood, à la Kendall Jenner. Sorry, coral.

[“source=theguardian”]

This #XLBossLady Brings Plus Size Fashion To LA

Jessica Hinkle, Owner of Proud Mary FashionJessica Hinkle

Access to fashion has arguably been one of the greatest struggles for the plus size community. Clothing isn’t just fabric we use to cover our bodies. It’s how we articulate who we are in the world. Few people know this better than Jessica Hinkle, the owner of LA-based Proud Mary Fashion. I interviewed Jessica about her journey into becoming an #XLBossLady:

I’ve been fashion-obsessed since I was a child. My parents would buy me notebooks and I would fill them all up with sketches. I’d sit in front of the tv watching runway show clips and sketching clothing. I also knew from an early age that the fashion industry wasn’t accessible for someone like me (fat and poor.) It always felt worlds away, kind of like trying to become a movie star. My parents moved us to Florida my senior year of high school. When I found out my new school offered apparel design classes, I immediately signed up. On the first day, the teacher talked me out of taking the class (to make way for freshman she said) but I really was made to feel like it wasn’t a place for me. I felt really judged and pushed out. I was heartbroken because I finally felt excited to find a resource to learn the things I wanted to that wouldn’t cost anything. After that, I had approached my parents about attending art school but they said absolutely not.

My parents both grew up poor and neither graduated high school. I think they felt like art school was lofty and impractical. They didn’t think that a fat girl could make money in fashion and the student loans would be outrageous. I wasn’t confident enough to push back or in a position where I felt like I could make it work without their support. So I figured I could at least study Creative Writing at the community college and one day get a job working at a fashion magazine.

[“source=forbes]

This Latina Fashion Designer Shares All She Has Learned Since Selling Her First Dress

Alexia Maria Alexia Maria

Alexia María started designing clothes for herself long before she ever designed a look for anyone else. Over time, and thanks to word of mouth and a strong social media presence, María was able to build a brand that has led to actors like America Ferrera and singers like Gwen Stefani wearing her looks.

In growing the brand from a business that sold primarily to friends and family to one that can be shopped at two flagship locations – one in California and one in New York — as well as online, María had to learn to juggle the demands from both the creative and business side of any new business.

“It takes a lot of discipline and a great team to give your 100% to both sides,” shares María. “With the help of my amazing team, I am able to completely focus on design when I need to. With their support I am able to let go of the business side for a while and just dive into designing.”

As an immigrant and Latina in the fashion space, María understands that women are layered and that the clothes they choose to wear reflect their heart above all.

“If you are comfortable with what you are wearing, you will be confident and be the best version of yourself,” notes María.

Below María shares her advice to other designers and entrepreneurs, how her Latinidad has influenced the trajectory of her career, and how she navigated making the jump to being a fashion designer.

[“source=forbes]

How This Former Fashion Exec Changed Her Career With A Baby In Tow

Miles and Milan founder, Shennel FullerMiles and Milan

For this former retail executive, becoming an entrepreneur was the realization of a life-long dream. But it wasn’t until the birth of her first son that Shennel Fuller decided to create her own children’s clothing line, Miles and Milan.

And according to TendLab CEO and Co-founder, Amy Henderson, there is no better time to make this decision:

…any parent who leaves their child to go to work—whether it’s a choice or financial necessity—must grapple with the distance it creates. There are times when we want to be with them, and we can’t be. And this forces us to question what we are doing, and why we are doing it. Answering this question forges us, like steel in molten fire, into stronger, more motivated versions of our former selves.

Like other successful entrepreneurs who leave the corporate world beyond, Fuller followed the fire in her belly and refused to take no for an answer. Her tenacity and fortitude were inherited; as she is the daughter of hard-working immigrant parents who instilled in her, an unparalleled work ethic.

With the support of her husband, parents and sister, this founder charted her own course to becoming an entrepreneur and hopes to inspire other women to do the same.

Fuller: My entrepreneurial journey started three years ago after my first son, Jackson was born. My background is corporate, and I’ve held a few executive positions. I was teetering and trying to figure out if I wanted to go back. I was always a very dedicated and hard worker. But now my hard work was focused on keeping this baby alive. I was trying to figure out how I could feel the most fulfilled. I wanted to be doing what I was most passionate about. I knew it was retail and fashion, so I wanted to continue being immersed in that world, while also having the flexibility of being with my son and not missing any milestones.

For a while, I did some consulting. I was helping a major corporation by revamping their whole retail strategy. I loved the freedom of consulting; the flexibility, being my boss, managing my schedule and being able to live in both worlds (motherhood and fashion). I would bring my son to my business meetings. My work was still getting done, so I kind of shifted the narrative. I felt like if I’m going to be giving you great ideas, and developing your strategy, I can also be rocking my son at the same time if he needs me.  Which made me think, not only could I be consulting more but I can take it a step further. My dream was always to have my clothing line, and that’s pretty much the reason why I got into buying and working for those corporate companies, to begin with.

[“source=forbes]