The Best Memorial Day 2019 Clothing Sales Online

The Best Memorial Day 2019 Clothing Sales

Many of us think of Memorial Day weekend as a time to snag home items and take advantage of mattress sales and markdowns on appliances. But that doesn’t mean you’re limited to finding good deals on these big-ticket items.

If you’re not looking for big home purchases but instead simply want to get a new pair of sandals or spring dress for cheap, you’re in luck, because there are a ton of great Memorial Day weekend fashion sales on shoes, clothing, bags and accessories.

Below, we’ve rounded up a handful of the best deals we’ve spotted. Just be sure to check back, as we’ll keep updating this list as deals are announced. Plus, if you want more of our editor-sourced products and reviews, sign up for HuffPost’s sales and deals newsletter.

Looking for the best deal before you buy? Take a look at HuffPost Coupons, where we have hundreds of promo codes from brands you trust, including Memorial Day weekend coupon codes.

Take a look below:

FYI, HuffPost may receive a share from purchases made via links on this page.

FASHION DEALS

MILKOS VIA GETTY IMAGES

Nordstrom

Nordstrom’s Half-Yearly Sale is going on now, and you’ll get up to 50% off name brands like Madewell, Topshop and more now through June 2.

Anthropologie

Get an additional 40% off sale items May 23 to May 27.

Everlane

Everlane just added a bunch of new styles to its Choose What You Pay sectionsfor men and women.

Zappos

Check Zappos sale section for deals on various sizes and styles beginning May 24.

Asos

Get 40% off fresh drops at Asos right now.

Keds

Get 25% off full-price items from May 23 to May 28.

RACHEL Rachel Roy

Get 40% off site-wide with codeSUMMER40 at check May 24 to May 28.

Adrianna Papell

Get 20% off Adrianna Papell from May 25 to May 28.

Urban Outfitters

Save up to 50% on fashion from Urban Outfitters on May 27.

Old Navy

Get 50% off all tees, tanks, shorts and swim now through May 31.

Shopbop

Save up to 40% on thousands of styles like Ulla Johnson, Rag & Bone and Club Monaco starting on May 21.

Express

Take an extra 50% off clearance from Express.

Franco Sarto

Get 25% off at Franco Sarto with codefsmemorial25 May 23 to May 27.

Gaiam

Get 20% off sitewide, with an extra 10% off $100 with code MEMORIAL10.

True & Co.

Save 20% off sitewide with code BIGSALE at True & Co.

Chinese Laundry

Buy one, get one 50% off from Chinese Laundry with codeBOGO50 May 22 to May 27.

Fossil

Take an extra 25% off sale styles with code READY25 from Fossil until May 27.

Peruvian Connection

Get free shipping and 20% off sale items May 23 to May 27.

eBags

Get 20% off at eBags May 24 to May 25.

Draper James

Get 40% off at Draper James May 24 to May 27.

Rag & Bone

Get 20% to 30% off at Rag & Bone now through May 27.

Lensabl

Take up to 20% off all lenses when you use code MDW from May 23 to May 31.

EyeBuyDirect

Get 20% off all frames and 30% off all lenses with code 20AND30 from EyeBuyDirect.

Reebok

Take $5 off any purchase, $10 off orders $85 or more and $20 off $100 or more with code SAVEMORE until May 31.

Net-A-Porter

Get up to 50% off on participating brands like Cult Gaia, Hunting Season and Prada from Net-A-Porter starting May 21.

HuffPost Store

Get 15% off T-shirts and lifestyle items with code WEEKEND15.

[“source=huffingtonpost”]

A day in the life of an accelerator designer

Tor Raubenheimer

What do particle accelerators and craggy outcrops have in common? Both have Tor Raubenheimer trotting the globe. Thanks to both his work at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and his passion for rock climbing, he has gotten to know people and places on several continents.

“There are places around the world where I know a group of people and I can go and work and hang out,” says Raubhenheimer. “It’s neat.”

Raubenheimer is an accelerator physicist — someone who designs, builds or operates particle accelerators. It’s a title that only a few thousand people lay claim to worldwide. Throughout his career, Raubenheimer has operated SLAC’s accelerators and designed new ones through international collaborations.

He is also an avid rock climber. He makes frequent trips to a local climbing gym — three or four times a week, he says — and occasionally, much longer trips to climbing destinations. Just in the last few years, he has climbed in Australia, Sardinia and Thailand as well as at California favorites like Joshua Tree National Park. For Raubenheimer, rock climbing is a fun way to get to know people and places.

“It’s having something in common, right?” Raubenheimer says. “Either accelerator physics or climbing. When you go to a different area, it makes merging into the culture there much easier.”

Raubenheimer’s climbing pursuits also played a part in bringing him to SLAC. During his college years as a physics and computer science double major at Dartmouth College, he took a year off to ski and climb in Yosemite National Park and was captivated by Yosemite Valley. After college, when he had the opportunity to work as a programmer at SLAC, the proximity to Yosemite and other outdoor wonders attracted him to California.

Working at SLAC opened Raubenheimer’s eyes to accelerator physics.

“As an undergraduate, I had no idea that the field even existed,” he says. “I knew about high-energy and particle physics. I knew about lasers. I didn’t know that there was actually a field studying accelerators.”

As a programmer at SLAC, he worked on software for the damping rings that helped narrow the particle beams emitted by the two-mile SLAC linear accelerator. Occasionally, he needed to go into the linear accelerator tunnel to check on a component or fix something. It’s this hands-on work, he says, that got him hooked.

“The immediate satisfaction of being able to do something and see a result was great,” Raubenheimer says.

He decided to go to graduate school in physics and got his PhD at Stanford, where he worked on a couple of other research projects before returning to accelerator physics. He worked on the linear collider at SLAC as well as researching problems that would need to be solved to build more advanced linear colliders. During his postdoc at SLAC, he started working on the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray laser and brought his knowledge of linear colliders to the project. In the years since, while a scientist and professor at SLAC and Stanford, he has worked on designing accelerator facilities at SLAC and internationally.

For the last few years, Raubenheimer has been working on the upgrade for LCLS, called LCLS-II. The upgraded LCLS-II will be able to shoot electron pulses and produce X-ray laser flashes up to one million times per second. LCLS-II will let scientists investigate microscopic phenomena in incredible detail and may ultimately lead to advances in storing energy and curing diseases.

The multifaceted nature of accelerator physics makes it an interesting challenge. On top of theory and simulations, Raubenheimer says, “you have to worry about plumbing, and all the details of how you support things, and what metals go in radiofrequency fields and what don’t. So it’s a very broad field. It requires expertise and knowledge across a wide set of disciplines.”

Many physics experiments involve either huge facilities and thousands of collaborators, like the Large Hadron Collider experiments, or smaller-scale equipment and a handful of researchers. For Raubenheimer, one of the draws of accelerator physics is working on large-scale projects in small teams, which lets him have his fingers in many pies.

“You’ll do the theory, you’ll do the simulation studies, and then you can do the experiments,” Raubenheimer says. “I like having large facilities to play with, but with a small group of people, you can really be involved in all aspects of the physics.”

[“source=symmetrymagazine”]

India vs Pakistan: Kashmiri wedding guests ensure there is TV at ceremony so they don’t miss the match

TV at a Kashmiri wedding so that people can watch India vs Pakistan World Cup match Photo: Twitter/ Shuja Ul Haq

TV at a Kashmiri wedding so that people can watch India vs Pakistan World Cup match

With each and every person of India and Pakistan being glued to their TV screens and watching the ICC World Cup 2019 match between the two countries, the cricket mania has reached the next level.

Everyone from the two neighboring countries is by hook or by crook trying to watch the match. To tell you exactly at what level the cricket craze has reached, we will share a tweet with you.

India Today’s reporter and Twitter user, Shuja Ul Haq shared a very interesting tweet with us. His tweet was captioned, “Guests at a wedding ceremony in Srinagar ensure that a TV enters the tent even before the groom. #IndiaVsPakistan #CricketWorldCup.”

[“source=indiatoday”]

11 Of The Best Men’s Shoes To Wear Without Socks That Won’t Smell

11 Of The Best Men's Shoes To Wear Without Socks That Won't

Warm weather means it’s time to swap your shoes and say goodbye to bulky boots and hello to sandals, boat shoes and slip-on sneakers. Some guys who really want to free their feet this season might even dare to go sockless, but there is a catch.

Wearing sneakers without socks in the summer always sounds like a good idea — until it isn’t. Between the sweltering heat and extra outdoor time, bare feet can get sweaty and smelly quick. That is, only if you’re wearing the wrong shoes.

If you’re looking to forgo socks with your footwear, the key is to look for sneakers that are made with breathable materials like canvas, leather or wool. It helps to have an antimicrobial lining to prevent bacteria or odor buildup. Machine-washable shoes are a winning idea because you can easily toss them in the laundry when they get too mucky.

To help you on your sockless journey, we’ve rounded up 10 of the best men’s shoes you can wear without socks that won’t leave your feet sweaty or smelly. And if you want more of our editor-sourced products and reviews, sign up for HuffPost’s sales and deals newsletter.

Take a look below:

  • Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Core Ox
    Zappos

    These Converse have a canvas upper, canvas lining and cushioned footbed.Find them for $50 at Zappos.

  • Sperry Authentic Original
    Zappos

    These Sperry shoes have a leather upper and dri-lex sock liner.Find them for $95 at Zappos.

  • TOMS Classic Canvas
    Zappos

    These TOMS have a canvas upper, breathable textile lining and suede leather footbed.Find them for $48 at Zappos.

  • Nike Revolution 4
    Zappos

    These Nikes have a mesh upper and fabric lining.Find them for $60 at Zappos.

  • Vans Authentic Core Classics
    Zappos

    These Vans have a canvas upper and cotton lining.Find them for $50 at Zappos.

  • Rockport Ports of Call Perth
    Zappos

    These Rockports have a leather upper and moisture-wicking suede lining. Find them for $110 at Zappos

  • Allbirds Men’s Wool Loungers
    Allbirds

    These Allbirds are made with moisture-wicking wool and are machine washable.Find them for $95 at Allbirds.

  • adidas Running UltraBOOST
    Zappos

    These adidas shoes have a knit textile upper and foam insole.Find it for $179 on Zappos.

  • Keds Pro-Keds Royal Lo Classic Canvas
    Zappos

    These Keds have canvas uppers, a breathable fabric lining and foam footbed.Get them for $60 at Zappos.

  • Dockers Beacon
    Zappos

    These Dockers have a nubuck and mesh upper with a breathable fabric lining.Find them for $60 on Zappos.

  • Sanuk Rounder
    Zappos

    These Sanuks have a canvas upper and lining.Find them for $52 at Zappos.

  • New Balance M990V4
    Zappos

    These New Balances have leather upper and fabric lining.Find them for $165 on Zappos.

[“source=huffingtonpost”]

Tonys 2019: Behind the Scenes With Legendary Event Designer Raúl Àvila

people dressed in black attaching rainbow roses to a green wall

On a night as star-studded and revered as the Tony Awards, any event designer would be hard-pressed to create an atmosphere as award-worthy as the plays being celebrated. But Raúl Àvila is not just any event designer. Àvila, who counts A-list event planner Robert Isabell among his mentors, designed this year’s Tony Awards red carpet with a theme that feels “particularly profound” to him. “The theme of this year’s carpet is inspired by the anniversary and celebration of World Pride,” he tells Architectural Digest. “I’m so proud to showcase the flag in the way that it deserves. What a beautiful testament to how far we’ve come.”

For this year’s carpet, Àvila stuck with roses, some of which he dyed or spray painted to compliment the theme (all roses, as has been the case in years past, were generously donated by Passion Roses. The Colombia-born designer and his team spent “months and months” planning the elaborate red carpet decor to ensure “the most seamless transformation” possible. “There are so many people involved with the process and many voices to be heard, but ultimately we always find consistency in the decision,” he says. In terms of inspiration, Àvila says he didn’t need to look any further than the Broadway community itself, which has always been “such a representative community.”

three bouquets of yellow roses
This year’s pride theme called for a rainbow of roses.

Courtesy of Raúl Avila Inc.

gray shelves stacked with boxes orange buckets on the floor in front of them
Supplies for the big night.

Courtesy of Raúl Avila Inc.

a pair of hands wearing gloves holding a bouquet of roses
Arranging roses for the display.

Courtesy of Raúl Avila Inc.

“We draw inspiration from everywhere, but focus, of course, on the broadway community in all its splendor,” he says. “Whether it’s the shows themselves, the music, the artists, or the performers, Broadway is an endless source of inspiration.” In previous years, Àvila has showcased bursts of pink and red-hued roses, an arresting all-red rose wall, and even a lush, all-green red carpet backdrop, all of which spoke to some facet of the dynamic world of theater. “I wanted the red carpet to evoke the style and elegance of the theater,” he told Vogue in 2016 of the all-red rose wall. “I chose roses in a striking red to cover the length of the step and repeat. It’s the ideal backdrop for arrivals to capture the glamour of the evening.” That year, Àvila and his team of 50 crew members needed 20 hours to assemble the 100,000 red roses; this year’s colorful homage to the LGBTQ community will undoubtedly require even more time and effort. But, Àvila says, it’s always worth it witnessing his vision come to life. “Seeing everything come together in the end, when I can finally take a breath and say ‘We did this,’ is always my proudest moment,” he says. “[Then] I celebrate with everyone. It’s the Tonys!”

[“source=architecturaldigest”]

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Consumers worried about their carbon footprints might want to take a look at, well, their footprints. The footwear industry is already aware of the climate impacts linked to materials and production, and working on solutions.

Now new luxury brand AERA has hit the streets with a shoe collection designers say is carbon-negative. The AERA line is a concept developed by prominent fashion executive Tina Bhojwani, an industry veteran of Donna Karan and Dolce & Gabbana, along with footwear designer Jean-Michel Cazabat and entrepreneur Alvertos Revach. They teamed up to deliver what they’re calling “vegan shoes” while offsetting the carbon and water inputs of footwear.

“We are working to set a new normal, one in which style, design and quality are analogous with sustainability,” said CEO Bhojwani. “I’m thrilled to announce that we have reached our number one objective – to become carbon negative.”

The company says it’s doing that through investment in reforestation projects that offset the carbon footprint by 110 percent, and water restoration certificates purchased through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation to achieve the same level of offsets on consumption. “And we’re not stopping there,” Bhojwani said. “Our next objective is to find ways to offset other key impacts.”

The shoes are made in the Veneto region of Italy in partnership with two families that have operated shoe factories for years, with just 20 and six employees respectively; the AERA team says that’s a conscious decision to support artisanal craftsmanship and corporate stewardship. AERA is also committed to living wages across its supply chain and is sourcing 95 percent of its materials from Italy too. The shoes are sold to consumers online.

A life-cycle assessment and impact verification for all AERA products was completed by SCS Global Services (SCS) to evaluate  the environmental  impacts of the materials, manufacturing process, transport and ultimate end-of-life for the shoes. Keith Killpack, the technical director for SCS, says the work “sets an important precedent for this industry given our current global climate challenge.”

The value of offsets and credits in the climate change fight can be controversial, as illustrated by a recent Pro Publica report on carbon credits and deforestation, but the AERA launch is a well-heeled step in the right direction for an industry that is looking for solutions to its outsize footprint.

A 2018 report from Qantis International looked at the impacts of synthetic, leather and textile-based shoes produced globally – more than half are synthetic – and found that footwear accounts for between 16 and 32 percent of the fashion industry’s total pollution though in different ways. Leather requires more raw materials and processing, often with toxic chemicals; textile-based shoes use a lot of water, and synthetics a lot of plastic.

Far too often all of them end up in a landfill, which is a problem reuse and recycling advocates like ShoeAid in the UK are trying to change.

Some shoe companies are turning to new materials like eucalyptus tree pulp or recaptured ocean plastic. Adidas hopes to make all of its running shoes from recycled plastic, beginning with marine waste. The company is a co-sponsor with nonprofit Parley of the Run for the Oceans, which kicks off on World Oceans Day on June 8.

[“source=sustainability-times.”]