11 Of The Best Men’s Shoes To Wear Without Socks That Won’t Smell

11 Of The Best Men's Shoes To Wear Without Socks That Won't

Warm weather means it’s time to swap your shoes and say goodbye to bulky boots and hello to sandals, boat shoes and slip-on sneakers. Some guys who really want to free their feet this season might even dare to go sockless, but there is a catch.

Wearing sneakers without socks in the summer always sounds like a good idea — until it isn’t. Between the sweltering heat and extra outdoor time, bare feet can get sweaty and smelly quick. That is, only if you’re wearing the wrong shoes.

If you’re looking to forgo socks with your footwear, the key is to look for sneakers that are made with breathable materials like canvas, leather or wool. It helps to have an antimicrobial lining to prevent bacteria or odor buildup. Machine-washable shoes are a winning idea because you can easily toss them in the laundry when they get too mucky.

To help you on your sockless journey, we’ve rounded up 10 of the best men’s shoes you can wear without socks that won’t leave your feet sweaty or smelly. And if you want more of our editor-sourced products and reviews, sign up for HuffPost’s sales and deals newsletter.

Take a look below:

  • Converse Chuck Taylor All Star Core Ox
    Zappos

    These Converse have a canvas upper, canvas lining and cushioned footbed.Find them for $50 at Zappos.

  • Sperry Authentic Original
    Zappos

    These Sperry shoes have a leather upper and dri-lex sock liner.Find them for $95 at Zappos.

  • TOMS Classic Canvas
    Zappos

    These TOMS have a canvas upper, breathable textile lining and suede leather footbed.Find them for $48 at Zappos.

  • Nike Revolution 4
    Zappos

    These Nikes have a mesh upper and fabric lining.Find them for $60 at Zappos.

  • Vans Authentic Core Classics
    Zappos

    These Vans have a canvas upper and cotton lining.Find them for $50 at Zappos.

  • Rockport Ports of Call Perth
    Zappos

    These Rockports have a leather upper and moisture-wicking suede lining. Find them for $110 at Zappos

  • Allbirds Men’s Wool Loungers
    Allbirds

    These Allbirds are made with moisture-wicking wool and are machine washable.Find them for $95 at Allbirds.

  • adidas Running UltraBOOST
    Zappos

    These adidas shoes have a knit textile upper and foam insole.Find it for $179 on Zappos.

  • Keds Pro-Keds Royal Lo Classic Canvas
    Zappos

    These Keds have canvas uppers, a breathable fabric lining and foam footbed.Get them for $60 at Zappos.

  • Dockers Beacon
    Zappos

    These Dockers have a nubuck and mesh upper with a breathable fabric lining.Find them for $60 on Zappos.

  • Sanuk Rounder
    Zappos

    These Sanuks have a canvas upper and lining.Find them for $52 at Zappos.

  • New Balance M990V4
    Zappos

    These New Balances have leather upper and fabric lining.Find them for $165 on Zappos.

[“source=huffingtonpost”]

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Consumers worried about their carbon footprints might want to take a look at, well, their footprints. The footwear industry is already aware of the climate impacts linked to materials and production, and working on solutions.

Now new luxury brand AERA has hit the streets with a shoe collection designers say is carbon-negative. The AERA line is a concept developed by prominent fashion executive Tina Bhojwani, an industry veteran of Donna Karan and Dolce & Gabbana, along with footwear designer Jean-Michel Cazabat and entrepreneur Alvertos Revach. They teamed up to deliver what they’re calling “vegan shoes” while offsetting the carbon and water inputs of footwear.

“We are working to set a new normal, one in which style, design and quality are analogous with sustainability,” said CEO Bhojwani. “I’m thrilled to announce that we have reached our number one objective – to become carbon negative.”

The company says it’s doing that through investment in reforestation projects that offset the carbon footprint by 110 percent, and water restoration certificates purchased through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation to achieve the same level of offsets on consumption. “And we’re not stopping there,” Bhojwani said. “Our next objective is to find ways to offset other key impacts.”

The shoes are made in the Veneto region of Italy in partnership with two families that have operated shoe factories for years, with just 20 and six employees respectively; the AERA team says that’s a conscious decision to support artisanal craftsmanship and corporate stewardship. AERA is also committed to living wages across its supply chain and is sourcing 95 percent of its materials from Italy too. The shoes are sold to consumers online.

A life-cycle assessment and impact verification for all AERA products was completed by SCS Global Services (SCS) to evaluate  the environmental  impacts of the materials, manufacturing process, transport and ultimate end-of-life for the shoes. Keith Killpack, the technical director for SCS, says the work “sets an important precedent for this industry given our current global climate challenge.”

The value of offsets and credits in the climate change fight can be controversial, as illustrated by a recent Pro Publica report on carbon credits and deforestation, but the AERA launch is a well-heeled step in the right direction for an industry that is looking for solutions to its outsize footprint.

A 2018 report from Qantis International looked at the impacts of synthetic, leather and textile-based shoes produced globally – more than half are synthetic – and found that footwear accounts for between 16 and 32 percent of the fashion industry’s total pollution though in different ways. Leather requires more raw materials and processing, often with toxic chemicals; textile-based shoes use a lot of water, and synthetics a lot of plastic.

Far too often all of them end up in a landfill, which is a problem reuse and recycling advocates like ShoeAid in the UK are trying to change.

Some shoe companies are turning to new materials like eucalyptus tree pulp or recaptured ocean plastic. Adidas hopes to make all of its running shoes from recycled plastic, beginning with marine waste. The company is a co-sponsor with nonprofit Parley of the Run for the Oceans, which kicks off on World Oceans Day on June 8.

[“source=sustainability-times.”]

M&S’ £50 summer shoes that sold out in just THREE hours are finally back in stock (but they’re already being snapped up so you’ll have to act fast)

A pair of M&S shoes that sold out in just three hours are back in stock.

The Fran, designed around a statement bow, proved a hit with shoppers and disappeared from shelves in just three hours when they were first introduced back in February.

The stylish pair of shoes was born from a M&S collaboration with influencer Fran Bacon from Instagram account Fashion Lift.

But act fast if you want to snatch a pair – the shoes are already selling out and have been snapped up in almost every size online, from size three to seven.

They're back! M&S restocked The Fran, its popular spring shoe designed by Fran Bacon of the Fashion Liff

They’re back! M&S restocked The Fran, its popular spring shoe designed by Fran Bacon of the Fashion Liff

The brand announced the Fran’s triumphant return on its Instagram page this morning.

The post read: ‘Sound the klaxon, our sell out Fran shoes from our “The Collective” shoe collection are back in stock.’

‘They sold out when they launched and by popular demand we have bought them back.’

A spokesperson for M&S told Mailonline that the shoes would also come back to ten selected stores across the UK too due to their popularity.

The £49.50 shoe (pictured) sold out in just three hours when it was first released back in February

The £49.50 shoe (pictured) sold out in just three hours when it was first released back in February

But online, some customers struck out while trying to get their hands on the Fran.

One wrote: ‘Added to bag, get to checkout to be told out of stock.’

‘I’m so disappointed that I’ve missed out again, when I went on ten minutes after you posted,’ regretted another.

The £49.50 feminine courts, released next month, are designed around a beautiful statement bow at the tow and boast a soft – and highly wearable – colour palette of nude and pink.

‘These court shoes will provide a feminine and stylish addition to your footwear collection,’ reads the M&S website.

The leather shoes (pictured) are adorned with a statement bow, in pink or nude, and a delicate ankle strap

The leather shoes (pictured) are adorned with a statement bow, in pink or nude, and a delicate ankle strap

The shoes are designed to be as comfortable as pretty, with their special sole built into the design.’ The Fran is part of The Footwear Collective, where social media stars design their own dream footwear for M&S.

The Instagram star styled hers with a pair of torn blue denim jeans and a sumptuously soft dusty rose velvet bag.

‘I love how feminine they feel,’ Fran said upon their initial release. ‘It was important that they represented my personality, and I think it has been captured so well.

Fans of the shoes tried to get their hands of a pair, but the item is already selling fast on the brand's website

Fans of the shoes tried to get their hands of a pair, but the item is already selling fast on the brand’s website

‘The neutral colours mean they can be worn with anything, dressed up or dressed down. I’ll be wearing ‘The Fran’ all summer,’ she added.

The high street stalwart unveiled its Footwear collective back in February.  They collaborated with seven stylish Instagrammers, who boast a combined following of more than 700,000 fans.

The women, all based in the UK, each designed their own shoe to reflect their personal style, whether it be a playful slide, statement heel or sporty sandal.

[“source=dailymail”]

Adidas Ensuring That All Their Shoes Can Be 100% Recycled into New Ones Without Any Waste

Image result for ShoesAdidas has already been making great strides to rid the world of plastic waste – and now they are taking it one step further by introducing a 100% recyclable performance running shoe that is “made to be remade.”

Sports footwear typically include complex material mixes and component gluing which result in a shoe that can only be downcycled.

After almost a decade of research and development, however, Adidas has refined the process to create the Futurecraft.Loop: a shoe that uses only one type of material and no glue.

Each component is made from 100% reusable TPU – it’s spun to yarn, knitted, molded and clean-fused. Once the shoes come to the end of their first life and are returned to Adidas – they are washed, ground to pellets and melted into material for components for a new pair of shoes, with zero waste and nothing thrown away.

The project is aimed at tackling the problem of plastic waste, enabling a “closed loop” or circular manufacturing model, where the raw materials can be repurposed again and again. But not just repurposed into a water bottle or a tote – but into another pair of high-performance running shoes.

In 2015, Adidas introduced the first footwear concept with its upper materials made entirely of yarns and filaments from reclaimed and recycled marine plastic waste and illegal deep-sea gillnets. In 2019, Adidas will produce 11 million pairs of shoes containing recycled ocean plastic through intercepting plastic waste on beaches, remote islands, and in coastal communities.

Adidas is now committed to using only recycled polyester in every one of their products and applications where a solution exists by 2024.

“Taking plastic waste out of the system is the first step, but we can’t stop there,” said Eric Liedtke, an Executive Board Member at adidas. “What happens to your shoes after you’ve worn them out? You throw them away – except there is no away. There are only landfills and incinerators and ultimately an atmosphere choked with excess carbon, or oceans filled with plastic waste. The next step is to end the concept of ‘waste’ entirely. Our dream is that you can keep wearing the same shoes over and over again.

“Futurecraft.Loop is our first running shoe that is made to be remade. It is a statement of our intent to take responsibility for the entire life of our product; proof that we can build high-performance running shoes that you don’t have to throw away.”

The first generation of Futurecraft.Loop is rolling out as part of a global beta program with 200 influencers from across the world’s major cities. Adidas is asking them to run, return the shoes, and share feedback on their experience ahead of the second-generation drop.

The insights will then be used to shape the roadmap for the wider release targeted for the spring or summer of 2021.

Tanyaradzwa Sahanga, who is the manager of Adidas’s innovation department, commented: “There were times when it didn’t seem like we could get over some of the technical hurdles – now we’ve made the first leap, the playing field has changed.

“We cannot create a circular future on our own, we are going to need each other. We’re excited to see this first step come to life as part of the beta launch.”

[“source=goodnewsnetwork”]

Nike thinks you’re probably wearing the wrong size shoe. Here’s what it’s doing to fix that

BEAVERTON, Ore. — Nike, the world’s biggest sneaker maker, wants to solve a problem it knows far too many people have: Which size shoes will fit?

Many shoppers have gone online and ordered multiple pairs of the same style shoe, in different sizes, planning to send back what doesn’t fit. The reasons are simple. Consumers often find they fit into different sizes — maybe a 7.5 women’s here, an 8.5 women’s there — depending on the brand and style. So, when it comes time to buy a new pair, there’s a lot of guessing going on.

It’s actually, very likely you don’t even know what your true shoe size is. Your feet could also be two entirely different sizes.

“Fit is such a big friction point for our customers,” said Michael Martin, Nike’s global head of digital products. “We reached a point of realizing this was not just the biggest problem but biggest transformational opportunity that we have. … No matter how good the shoe is, if the foot doesn’t fit well within the shoe, you’re not going to get peak performance from it.”

Now, Nike says it has a solution. The company will launch Nike Fit, a service being added in North America this July to its mobile app and in stores. Nike Fit will scan customers’ feet and determine the correct size. The service will roll out to Europe in August, moving to other international markets soon after.

Nike Fit is part of Nike’s bigger push to sell more products directly to consumers through its own shops, website and mobile app, relying less on wholesale partners than it has in the past. And so Nike is opening new stores, like its House of Innovation in New York and Nike Live in Los Angeles, designed specifically for those markets and selling items visitors can’t find anywhere else.

Nike said its direct sales in 2018 were up 12%, thanks to strong e-commerce growth and the opening of new stores. And it said direct-to-consumer revenue ended the year representing roughly 30% of total Nike brand sales, up from 28% in the prior year. With a market cap of roughly $130 billion, Nike has watched its shares climb nearly 22% over the past 12 months, outpacing the S&P 500 Retail ETF’s (XRT’s) decline of 1.5%.

Nike Fit will also help the retailer better manage inventory, cut down on returns and even entice shoppers to buy more shoes, early beta testing of the technology showed.

Down to the millimeter

At its core, Nike Fit will work when a customer opens the Nike app,selects a shoe to buy, and then instead of selecting a numerical size, the shopper will be presented with the option to scan his or her foot straight using a smartphone. A scan can take less than 15 seconds. And then Nike Fit will recommend a size for that particular shoe being considered. That information — such as the width of the shoppers’ foot, down to the millimeter — will be saved for later purchases, too, because the size may vary with the style. Nike’s Air Jordan shoe, for example, fits differently than other sneakers.

In stores, Nike will have a similar experience, but a sales associate will do the scanning.

Nike is launching Nike Fit in North America in July. Here's what the experience will look like in Nike's mobile app.

Source: Nike
Nike is launching Nike Fit in North America in July. Here’s what the experience will look like in Nike’s mobile app.

It’s staggering, data shows how many people are either squeezing into a shoe too small or have one falling off the foot.

At any given time, 3 in 5 people are wearing the wrong shoe size, based on industry research, Martin said. And the biggest reason for shoes being returned — whether they were purchased in store or online — is because of size, he said, adding that Nike receives more than 500,000 calls each year to its customer-service line related to sizing.

Return deliveries of all products will cost retailers $550 billion by 2020, according to estimates.

And, worse news for consumers, wearing the wrong size shoes can lead to injuries that can sideline them from playing a sport or from going to the gym. Foot injuries can also keep you from going to work. At least 60,000 foot injuries are responsible for keeping Americans out of the office each year, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

“Consumers more than ever want to have relationships with a brand. … Those [retailers] that are winning are serving personally.”-Heidi O’Neill, president of Nike Direct

In 2018, Nike spent an undisclosed amount to acquire Invertex, a computer-vision firm based in Israel to make Nike Fit possible. Years before this deal was finalized, Invertex had already begun working on a way to scan feet via a smartphone and make sizing recommendations, using machine learning.

Invertex CEO David Bleicher said many companies were approaching him and his colleagues by 2017 for their technology. But he said Invertex ultimately chose to work Nike, viewing the retailer as an “innovation powerhouse.” Bleicher now heads a digital studio for Nike in Tel Aviv, where he says Invertex is working to solve “many other challenges” in the industry. “The bigger vision is to [help Nike] create better shoes,” he said.

The rollout of Nike Fit isn’t the first time Nike has tried to tackle the sizing issue.

In 2000, the company launched its Air Presto shoe — designed by Tobie Hatfield, brother of well-known Nike shoe designer Tinker Hatfield — in sizes like “small,” “medium” and “large,” mimicking how T-shirts are sized, not using numbers. But it was more of a test to see how shoppers reacted to the stretchy material in the Presto shoes and the T-shirt sizing. And Nike eventually went back to numerical sizing for the Presto about three years ago.

Barleycorn and Brannock devices

But numerical sizing can still be imprecise — and is incredible outdated.

The shoe sizing system is archaic, dating to the 1330s. It’s somewhat of an urban legend that the reigning king of England in 1334 wanted a pair of shoes custom made for him. And when they didn’t fit, he grew angry and decided to make some standard system of measurement, because there was none. The legend goes he declared three barleycorns, or grains of barley, were equal to an inch. And so 21 barleycorns became equivalent to a size 7 shoe, for example.

Fast forward to 1925, and the Brannock Device was made. That was an attempt by Charles Brannock to perfect the barleycorn method, adding a width measurement. You know, that (horribly uncomfortable) silver, metal tray that you slide your foot into, moving around little bars, to find your shoe size? That same Brannock is still found in Macy’s shoe departments, Foot Lockersand DSWs across the country today.

“It was all well-intentioned, and it all had a good purpose,” said Bill Tippit, a senior engineering director at Nike, about the Brannock. “We still use it today, but it really is the thing that just destroyed fit.”

A shopper's foot is measured using a brannock device.

Source: Getty Images
A shopper’s foot is measured using a brannock device.

Then, there are a handful of up-start sneaker makers that have been looking for ways to solve this problem, too.

A Brooklyn-based company called Atoms, which sells its shoes to people only through invitations, has designed its sneakers in quarter sizes and will send customers three pairs at once. Then, a shopper can pick the two shoes that fit the left and right foot best, even if they’re different quarter sizes.

Outside of shoes, bra-maker ThirdLove has embraced the idea of creating the perfect fit for women. It has a “fit finder” tool on its website for shoppers to answer questions and then receive personalized bra recommendations.

“The brands gaining favor with consumers today are ones who know how to relate,” said Raj Nijjer, vice president of marketing at Yotpo. “They dialogue with customers, hear their pain points, and more often than not discover there’s no such thing as one-size-fits-all. The brands that win are the ones that embrace their customers’ individuality and deliver products with the perfect fit.”

Shoring up the top spot

Beyond educating its customers on sizing, and hopefully helping more people avoid injuries from wearing the wrong size shoe, this technology could also be a financial boon for Nike, with its dominant position in the sneaker industry.

According to NPD Group sports analyst Matt Powell, Nike is the No. 1 footwear brand in the U.S. in terms of sales, representing roughly one-third of the market, ahead of Adidas, with 11% of the market, and Under Armour. It also remains really hot among teens with money to spend.

“Nike is not in any danger of giving up No. 1 by any means,” Powell said. “The consumer today is looking for unique products,” which Nike continues to churn out, he said.

However, Adidas, while it still holds a smaller share of the U.S. market, has been growing sales in the U.S. at a faster rate. In its latest reported quarter, Adidas said North America sales grew by more than 11%, compared with a 7% gain in Nike’s sales in the region. Adidas is also ramping up for a sneaker collaboration with Beyonce, which is expected to generate momentum in the U.S.

In 2018, 64% of Nike brand revenues came from footwear — shoe sales were $22.27 billion out of $34.49 billion in total sales. That doesn’t include sales from Converse, which operates as a separate business within Nike, and so Converse sneakers won’t be compatible with Nike Fit.

Shoe sales were up 6% last year, excluding currency changes, thanks to strength in running, Nike said. But that was less than the 8% growth in footwear revenues in 2017, as Nike didn’t sell as many Jordan shoes in 2018.

When testing Nike Fit in stealth in three markets — Seattle, Pasadena, California, and Dallas — Martin said the company noticed conversion rates increased for the people who used Nike Fit to find the right shoe size, meaning those people were more likely to leave the store with a bag in their hands. They were also more likely to come back later and buy another pair of shoes. Nike said returns were down at those stores. And associates spent less time running back and forth to the stock room to gather other sizes.

It can also help Nike stock the right inventory. Martin explained that Nike, like many shoe brands, typically ships shoes in bulk to different regions based on a standard “curve” that’s long predicted for the industry how many people typically wear each shoe size. But he said that curve is not as exact as it could be. And so it’s easy for companies to end up with too many size 10 sneakers in one market, when it’s really the 9 that more of those people need to be wearing, for example. Data gathered from Nike Fit should help the company make its own curve of sorts.

“We’ve never had any data coming back to understand just how accurate is that distribution,” Martin said.

Nike Fit is expected to help Nike grow its membership base, which amounts to more than 150 million people worldwide today. A Nike membership is free to sign up for and offers members early access to new products, a birthday reward, the ability to chat with athletes for tips on merchandise or training, and on-the-go workouts from Nike’s app. The company says it’s on track to increase its membership base to 300 million people, as those shoppers spend 40% more than guest customers, on average.

During its six-month trial run of Nike Fit in three stores, Nike said the service was the strongest lever to boost membership sign-ups that it has found.

Inside Nike's House of Innovation in New York, a concierge helps Nike Plus members find items for their taste and then tailors them to fit shoppers perfectly.

Source: Nike
Inside Nike’s House of Innovation in New York, a concierge helps Nike Plus members find items for their taste and then tailors them to fit shoppers perfectly.

“Consumers more than ever want to have relationships with a brand. They don’t look at their experience with brands as transactional,” said Heidi O’Neill, president of Nike Direct. “You see a more premium, more personal retail environment. Those [retailers] that are winning are serving personally.”

Nike Fit is just the latest step in bringing a bigger vision to reality, according to Martin. He sees a day where shoe sizes don’t exist. A customer goes to buy a pair of shoes, a box shows up with those shoes inside, and instead of a number on the outside it’s your name — “Sarah” or “Michael.”

But that will also require more of the industry to get on board with the idea that the Brannock Device is seriously outdated, and that consumers deserve better fit.

“We think this is a problem people have been trying to solve for a long time,” O’Neill said. “But we feel super confident in our solution. … We know we are going to have a new level of trust from consumers.”

[“source=cnbc”]

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