New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer – No, It’s Not Sabyasachi

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer - No, It's Not Sabyasachi

 

After Sabyasachi and The House Of Angadi, Deepika Padukone picked an outfit from the shelves of Anamika Khanna for one of her wedding functions. The designer shared an image of Deepika with her family on her Instagram page and used ‘#weddingfestivities’ in the caption (now edited out) but she did not give away the details of event. In the picture, Deepika Padukone, dressed in an organza outfit, smiled as she hugged her family (in a very Hum Saath-Saath Hain style). Deepika’s sister Anisha, dressed in a chikankari anarkali, looked pretty. Deepika Padukone married actor Ranveer Singh in Italy earlier this month in the presence of their families and close friends. The couple is gearing up for their first Mumbai reception scheduled for November 28.

Anamika Khanna is the third designer Deepika Padukone opted for her wedding festivities, first being her favoured designer Sabyasachi. Deepika also wore a pure zari kanjeevaram saree in gold for the reception, which was a gift by her mother Ujjala Padukone from The House of Angadi. Deepika’s orange and gold saree for the Konkani wedding was also from The House of Angadi.

[“source=ndtv”]

How Designer Marcelo Burlon County of Milan Developed A Mature Collaboration With Muhammad Ali

Marcelo Burlon  photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Whether drawn by splendid designs or heartfelt recollections, or the curiosity of what will be the next big thing, streetwear has  proudly proven its sustainability in a volatile fashion marketplace. Make no bones about it, streetwear is meant to be enjoyed and experienced in the proper fashion. Rich textures and hues mesmerize the consumers with waves of exotic yet familiar styles. Streetwear is street fashion that saw its humble beginnings take root in California’s surf and skate culture. Since then, it has grown to encompass elements of hip-hop fashion, Japanese street fashion, and lately modern haute couture fashion. Streetwear more than often centers on more relaxed pieces such as jeans, baseball caps, hoodies and sneakers.

Nevertheless, let me be clear; streetwear was born in the USA. Throughout history, the USA has played a significantly creative role in fashion and quite often we don’t give ourselves a good pat on the back for our creative developments on fashions timeline of history. The movement is born out of the Los Angeles surf culture of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Even if we look as legendary surfboard designer Shawn Stussy, you’ll find that he began selling printed T-shirts featuring the same trademark signature he used on his custom surfboards. At first, he was selling the Stussy items from his own car. Soon thereafter he expanded sales to boutiques once popularity has increased and Stussy had become a household name. To be clear, the two most important components of streetwear is T-shirts and exclusivity. Early streetwear brands took inspiration from the DIY aesthetic of punk, new wave, heavy metal and later hip hop cultures. Subsequently. well-known sportswear and fashion brands attached themselves to the emerging early 1980s hip hop scene such as Kangol and Adidas. At this point, the game just got interesting. Nike’s signing of soon-to-be basketball superstar Michael Jordan from their  rival Adidas in 1984 changed the game altogether, as Nike now dominated the urban streetwear sneaker market in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Moving forward, we witnessed brand launches by the chief executives of major record companies with then heavyweights Russell Simmons of Def Jam launching his Phat Farm label, Sean Combs of Bad Boy with Sean John, and Jay-Z and Damon Dash of Roc-a-Fella Records launching Rocawear.  Years later, even rap superstar 50 Cent launched his G-Unit clothing label, with the sneaker rights given to Reebok.  This simply meant that the big fashion companies not only  saw a future in streetwear but rather  embraced the streetwear culture. So where does this leave streetwear now? Recently, we find an increase in established luxury brands entering into the market. Last year, Louis Vuitton proudly named Virgil Abloh (Off-White brand) as the brand menswear creative director. So then, what really popularized the streetwear trend? In a word, the decline of formal wear led to the rise of streetwear fashion. I recently reviewed a streetwear designer brand that peaked my interest.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Marcelo Burlon was born in Argentinia. His approach to fashion has caught the attention of new generations on his very own rainbow tour of the social-media era. Moving with his parents to Porto Potenza Picena in Italy at 14, he would become a notorious club kid in Rimini. That was until a career organizing events for major fashion houses and DJ-ing relocated him to Milan in 2012 and paved the way for the launch of his streetwear brand Marcelo Burlon County of Milan. Five years on, he has become a fan phenomenon in Italy and beyond, and the poster boy for a new wave of fashion entrepreneurs who are set on challenging the establishment.

[“source=forbes]

Designer babies: Indian scientists question implications of gene editing

Several research labs across India are using CRISPR, the gene editing tool used by He Jiankui to create the designer babies, to correct mutations in genetic disorders. Photo: Bloomberg

Several research labs across India are using CRISPR, the gene editing tool used by He Jiankui to create the designer babies, to correct mutations in genetic disorders. Photo: Bloomberg

New Delhi: Scientists in India are deeply divided over the implications of the recent shock announcement about gene-edited “designer” babies made by a Chinese scientist. The responses range from disbelief about the research to potential implications for next-generation science. On Monday, He Jiankui, a scientist from China, presented his findings at a genome summit in Hong Kong claiming to have created the world’s first gene-edited twins. Jiankui edited a gene in the embryo and implanted it in the mother’s womb to make the babies resistant to HIV infection. The twin girls were delivered last month, he said.

“He created a next-generation baby, which almost falls in the purview of designer babies. It sets a wrong precedent. Creating a child with specific traits or deciding how the next generation will be could open the technology for potential misuse by those who have the tools, funds and necessary resources,” said senior scientist Debojyoti Chakroborty from CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), Delhi, “It was definitely not the necessity at the moment,” he added.

Several research laboratories across India are using gene-editing tool CRISPR to correct mutations in genetic disorders like sickle cell anaemia and haemophilia by isolating embryonic stem cells derived from patients, trying to establish preclinical studies and examining if these can be used for therapy. Some are doing basic research on CRISPR, while others are engaged in identifying genes in plant and animal genomes after knockout or knock-in of a gene to study their function and impact.

Ever since its discovery in 2012, consensus has prevailed among international scientists not to use CRISPR for editing embryos, until it is proven to be completely safe. However, research by the Chinese scientist, which is yet to be published in any journal, or ‘peer-reviewed’, has set the alarm bells ringing on its future consequences, especially when the research in the domain is on at an exponential rate.

Girish Sahni, former director-general, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), who is credited with developing India’s first indigenous clot-buster drug for cardiovascular diseases, said, “The technology is fairly developed to reap awards. But the focus should be on its monitoring and ensuring strict guidelines to regulate its use.”

That said, Sahni is excited about the potential. “Gene-editing is a powerful tool. India has already lost precious time and it is yet to make any breakthrough in this domain. We should immediately work out modalities by which the research in this area can be conducted, but it should be tied to societal needs, especially agriculture, where it has the maximum scope. We can improve the quality of livestock and agriculture products.”

Plant geneticist, Imran Siddiqui from the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), says the technology offers a big advantage. “If you mutate one gene, it does not cause any evident change in the plant or organism, because the function of that one gene is taken over by a related gene. But, CRISPR offers the advantage of targeting multiple members of the gene family for mutations in just one go, to show visible consequences,” he said.

The underlying concerns are more on the validity of the current research, risk assessment and safety, and ethics as it is believed that the edited embryo could become more vulnerable to other infections. “It is shrouded in mystery. It will take several years to understand how safe it is,” said Chakroborty.

Scientists also contend that there are more pressing disorders that could have been taken up for research.

“It is indeed the ‘therapy of the future’, be it cancer biology and neurodegenerative diseases. If we can isolate the defective genes, it opens up huge applications for disease-control. But, there is still a long way to go. We are taking the first few steps,” said Amitava Sengupta, senior scientist from CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (IICB), Kolkata.

[“source=gsmarena”]

Meet Fashion Designer Şansım Adalı Of Sudi Etuz At Her Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi Debut

Şansım Adalı of Sudi Etuz and models in the collection after her show.Courtesy of Mercdes-Benz.

A big challenge for emerging fashion designers is to show their collection abroad, and the Mercedes-Benz International Design Exchange Program allows for many to do that. Turkish fashion designer Şansım Adalı traveled to Georgia, where she presented her label Sudi Etuz internationally for the first time as part of the Mercedes-Benz International Designer Exchange Program

(IDEP) during Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi. The designer’s Spring/Summer 2019 was a love letter to Istanbul, with references to the city through its geography and opulent buildings. Bulbous sleeves were shaped like Palace doors, while the decolletage of a bandeau top traced the outlines of the famed Bosphorus Strait that links Asia to Europe. Delicate ruffles and swathes of tulle gave the collection and ethereal touch, ideal for that staid woman who lunches, and the fun, young debutante alike. Adalı spoke to a group of reporters after her show, where she discussed her first time traveling abroad, her ode to Istanbul, and the challenges of being an emerging designer.

How did you get the opportunity to present at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Tbilisi?

Last season I was presented by Mercedes-Benz in my hometown, Istanbul, and they gave me a chance to do an exchange program. There was a list of some cities in which Tbilisi took my attention because the emerging designers are so cool. Fashion week goes really well. I really wanted to be a part of it, and thanks to Mercedes, they just placed me here, and replaced me with a Georgian designer, and the experience improved me a lot because I’m out of my country for the first time, so it was a really great experience to be a part of it, and working with Georgian models and a Georgian team.

Turkey shares a border with Georgia. Is there a strong connection between countries?

Yeah we do. We don’t even need passports to fly. We’re just neighbors. We’re so close.

Were you exposed Georgian culture growing up?

In Istanbul I have some Georgian friends, and my teacher from fashion school was Georgian, so she was telling me stylist friends who are visiting Tbilisi Fashion Week, they are always telling me a lot about it, like how cool the places are, and how the street style so good, and how international press is giving much attention, and the city is inspiring. I didn’t expect this much. They preserved all the buildings, everything really good, and inspired me. Being in the city gave me so much inspiration.

[“source=forbes]

Stars Of Style To Lead Lively Forbes China Lifestyle Discussion

Image result for Stars Of Style To Lead Lively Forbes China Lifestyle Discussion

Stars of style and social media from China and afar will join a lively discussion of lifestyle trends to be hosted in Shanghai on Nov. 27 by Forbes China, the Chinese-language edition of Forbes.

Speakers will include billionaire Gao Dekang, chairman of down apparel leader Bosideng International, Macau entrepreneur Sabrina Ho, and Wendy Yu, CEO of fashion industry investment firm Yu Holdings.  Gao and Yu have appeared on Forbes China covers this year. Samantha Cameron, founder of UK fashion firm Cefinn and wife of former British Prime Minister David Cameron, will also attend.

Other participants include Meme Tian, author of “The Things Money Can’t Solve” and actress, as well as architect Yu Ting. Yi Wang, co-founder of Laix (formerly known as Liulishuo), the U.S.-listed education company headquartered in Shanghai, and investor Harry Hui, partner of ClearVue Partners, will also be on hand to discuss what’s new and what’s not at the Wanda Reign on the Bund.

[“source=forbes]

The Making of Georgian Fashion Moment: Tbilisi Fashion Week

From those tiny sunglasses seen on just about every celebrity to cover-rocking distressed denim outfits, Georgian designers have been setting major micro-trends lately. How big is Georgian fashion right now? Well, Tbilisi features two fashion weeks to accommodate its growing number of designers wanting to present to the international visiting crowds of press, buyers, and influencers. We start our series on emerging Georgian fashion industry with the 18th edition of Tbilisi Fashion Week.

Tako Chkheidze (center) with Georgian actresses Irinka Kavsadze (the granddaughter of the Bela Mirianshvili) and Gogola Kalandadze.Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Dedicated to the beloved 1960’s Georgian actress Bela Mirianashvili, the grand opening took place high above the city at the spectacular terraces of the Funicular restaurant. Guests were greeted by models in modest monochrome dresses evoking nostalgia for a bygone era of cinema and a slower pace of pre-digital life. Fashion week founder Tako Chkheidze spoke eloquently about art and fashion not as perpetually transient frenetic trends, but as cultural forces leaving a lasting influence. By choosing to dedicate the events to a style icon from a period of Soviet censorship and scarcity, organizers highlighted the creative spirit that has always prevailed in Georgia! Such an intro was perfect for the week’s agenda focused on eco fashion.

Éthéré Accessoire presentation at the GhvinisUbani art spaceCourtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

The spring-summer 2019 collections were presented at the Ghvinis Ubani, a former Wine Factory turned multifunctional arts space, with several noteworthy locations such as the Museum of Modern Art and Chaikana Bazar serving as additional stages. In place of the conventional catwalk the runway was converted in an attractive pasture of synthetic grass to highlight the theme: “We must take care of nature.” Designer Lasha Jokhadze opened the show with an unusual theatrical presentation of his sophisticated all-black evening wear collection. His models were arranged lying down and as the music started, they helped each other rise to their feet and walked around hand-in-hand.

Lasha Jokhadze S/S 2019Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Designer Tatia Korsava was a winner of the Tbilisi Fashion Week talent competition last season with a menswear debut inspired by medieval arts and neo-expressionist motifs in paintings by Merab Abramishvili. She made a strong highly-anticipated comeback with a post-apocalyptic collection reflecting modern ecological threats. Models wore protective trench coats, rubber suits, military jumpsuits and gas masks. Korsava playfully challenged gender norms, pairing ragged menswear with feminine glossy pleather waist-cinching bodices, bird-print silk blouses, and see-through mesh shirts.

Tatia Korsava S/S 2019Courtesy of Tbilisi Fashion Week

Another gender-bending twist on proportions and silhouette came from the Russian brand 1377. It re-conceptualized menswear staples with inclusion of mixed textures and elements typically reserved for women or children: flower appliques, flowing capes, and lurex tights. Even the lapti¸ the quintessential Russian peasant tree bark shoes, felt authentic in this well-thought-out presentation.

[“source=forbes]

The Curious Emptiness Of Renting Everyday Fashion

The 20th annual Initiatives in Arts and Culture (IAC) Conference was held Thursday and Friday at the Museum of The City of New York. Founded by Lisa Koenigsberg, IAC’s primary activities are conferences, publications, and exhibitions that take an interdisciplinary approach, considering issues related to fabrication, connoisseurship, cultural patrimony, cultural preservation, and the future of culture.

This year the conference featured a “think tank” gathering of leaders, associations, and trendsetter, exploring the fluidity and changes affecting the fashion industry, including how disruptors bring innovation and revolution to the design story.

2018 IAC ConferenceCourtesy IAC Conference

Speakers included fashion designers Jason Wu, Cynthia Rowley and Rebecca Minkoff, bestselling author and Columbia professor Caroline Weber, jewelry designer Prince Dimitri of Yugoslavia, and fashion marketing guru Ivan Bart.

Koenigsberg spoke about the conference, its goals, and the changing environment in fashion and retail.

How has the conference changed or evolved over the past 20 years?

The conference has retained its focus on the history of fashion and related expressions, exploring major houses and designers.  At the same time, IAC and the conference have increasingly been concerned with what is happening now: adornment jewels and accessories, and issues pertaining to the relationship of fashion to larger social issues, ranging from sustainability, to inclusion, to social media and marketing, as well as the power of the image.

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How can the conference be helpful in dealing with a rapidly changing fashion environment?

Every year we consider pressing issues of the moment, and our consideration is enhanced because of IAC’s relationships with industry leaders, academics, professional associations, designers, and today’s thought leaders. We commit to bringing pressing issues ranging from design trends to body types; various price points, each of which has its demands; and new approaches to balancing societal imperatives with fashion, and all that is involved in creating great design.

How can new designers establish themselves without using the traditional route of brick & mortar stores?  Will it even be possible?

Yes, we can see this in front of us every day. La Ligne, established by three women, is a direct to consumer brand.  Through e-commerce, trunk shows and other appearances, La Ligne makes use of relationship-based endorsements from high profile loyal followers called La Bande.  Much current discussion addresses the power of Instagram, and whether it has eclipsed print publications.  Additionally, pop-up shops allow for episodic but traditional encounters with the consumer, ranging from trendy to high-end.

This upcoming Monday, November 12th,  IAC will be hosting its inaugural diamond and gemstone conference at the William and Anita Newman Conference Center of Baruch College, at 151 East 25th Street. Day of Light seeks to explore a range of topics, from branding initiatives in the industry, to color trends affecting design, to the importance of storytelling in customer engagement and experience. By exploring the bread and butter bridal market alongside bespoke, as well as issues impacting the colored gemstone industry, Monday’s program is set to immerse participants in thoughtful and engaging discussions around hot topics, better practices, and new approaches for customer connection.

[“source=forbes]

Atelier NL and Envisions named designers of the year at Dezeen Awards

Atelier NL and Envisions named designers of the year at Dezeen Awards

Amy Frearson | 13 hours ago Leave a comment

Dutch design duo Atelier NL has been named Designer of the Year while fellow Dutch studio Envisions has won Emerging Designer of the Year at Dezeen Awards.

Atelier NL founders Nadine Sterk and Lonny van Ryswyck won the Designer of the Year prize, which is given for “all-round design excellence over a body of work by an designer or design studio that has been in business for more than 10 years”.

The Eindhoven-based pair have built up a body of work exploring the potential of locally sourced raw materials, including sand, soil and clay.

Atelier NL and Envisions named designers of the year at Dezeen Awards
The studio has recently been collecting samples of wild sand from around the world

Their Clay Service project has produced a range of ceramics that showcase clay varieties from different locations around the Netherlands.

Meanwhile their recent project ZandGlass – for which they won the Homeware Design of the Year prize – saw them draw from their research into wild sand around the world to create a range of regionally specific glassware.

Atelier NL and Envisions named designers of the year at Dezeen Awards
Atelier NL use this material to create their regionally specific ZandGlass glassware

The jury praised the designers for the “consistent sensitivity throughout their work” and they way they concentrate on “local materials and responsible production practices whilst also maintaining a very high level of aesthetics throughout all their projects.”

“They tackle ideas such as sense of place and geographic specificity successfully, making the conversation about sustainable practices a richer one,” said the judges.

“Using impressively rigorous and interesting design thinking, they create beautiful objects with good craftsmanship.”

The prize sees the pair presented with a Dezeen Awards trophy that they designed themselves. Made from London clay, they were produced by hand from craftspeople at brick manufacturer Wienerberger.

Atelier NL and Envisions named designers of the year at Dezeen Awards

[“source=ndtv”]

Nintendo SwitchAccessories Nyko Is Releasing A Bunch Of Switch Accessories Before The End Of The Year

In addition to Nyko’s Dualies – a pair of Joy-Con alternatives due out next month – the third-party gaming accessory manufacturer has revealed it will be releasing a number of other products for the Nintendo Switch before the end of the year. The entire range can be pre-ordered from Nyko’s website and Amazon.

First up we have the Charge Base Plus – a charging dock for the Poké Ball Plus priced at $14.99. It’s powered by a Type-C USB cable and allows the ball to be charged when it’s not being used. It also comes with a carry case, providing increased protection when you’re in transit. Take a look below:

For the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate enthusiasts, Nyko will be offering two handy adapters for the Switch. The first is the four port Retro Controller Hub. As you can probably tell, this is based on the design of the official GameCube adapter and allows GameCube controllers to be used while playing the Switch. Much like the actual product, it connects to the system via USB. It will also set you back $14.99. The other product priced at $9.99 is the Retro Controller Adapter. This is a single-port adapter for one GameCube controller. Check out both of these items below:

Finally, to go alongside the Dualies, we have the Wireless Core Controller, which will be available in Clear, Red, Blue, Purple and Green for $29.99. It’s a relatively straightforward gamepad at an affordable price. Here’s a look at all of the different colours:

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