New shoes make a difference

Image result for New shoes make a differenceChildren sat attentive in rows of chairs with parents behind them as a college student washed their feet and exchanged kind words before putting a new sneaker on each foot.

More than 60 University of Jamestown students greeted area families that registered for the Samaritan’s Feet distribution day event Sunday at Harold Newman Arena. The UJ students collected 275 pairs of new shoes over the first semester and from direct donations and at a UJ basketball game.

“In retrospect it’s been a lot of work but it doesn’t seem like work, it really doesn’t,” said Mika Thorlakson, a UJ professor of kinesiology and program adviser.

The UJ students were moved by the idea of collecting and distributing shoes for kids, some of whom have never had a new pair, he said. Active and growing kids go through a lot of shoes which puts a burden on parents, he said.

The kids and parents were led to a feet washing station and the youth were fitted with new shoes. The kids were then invited to play games with UJ students on the arena floor.

Charles Eastman of Jamestown said he and his wife were grateful to have a new pair of shoes for their 9-year-old daughter. She goes through a lot of clothing, especially jackets and shoes, and any help is appreciated, he said.

“Anytime we can get some type of help it makes things a lot easier on us,” Eastman said.

Jeremy and Justina Jones said their 8-year-old twin boys are active and go through shoes fast.

“It’s great that they provide this help for children,” Justina said. “I just think it’s a great program.”

Denise Blomberg, regional operations director of the Samaritan’s Feet in Sioux Falls, S.D., said Jamestown has a culture of service and the servant leadership example is exemplified at the university. It’s a community that is aligned well with the organizational goal of giving out a million shoes this year, she said.

“This is a natural progression for us to start the Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors chapter here,” Blomberg said. “This is the first of its kind and it can be replicated anywhere.”

Samaritan’s Feet was founded in 2003 by Manny Ohonme, who came to the University of North Dakota-Lake Region on a basketball scholarship and went on to earn a master’s degree. As a youth in Nigeria, the gift of his first pair of shoes from a missionary at age 9 changed his life.

The UJ Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors is a first-of-its-kind model that may soon be used at other colleges and communities that form their own chapters, Blomberg said. The UJ students collected more than 200 pairs of shoes in 2018 but had not yet formed the Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors chapter.

Sunday’s event was rescheduled from a weather-cancelled event on Jan. 26. When the UJ totals are known they will be added to the other events in 15 cities and 12 states when more than 9,000 pairs of shoes were given to children as part of the Martin Luther King National Day of Service Initiative, she said.

More than 6,500 pairs of shoes have been distributed at events in seven North Dakota cities since 2014, she said. More than 6.9 million shoes have been distributed in 41 states in that time.

Tommy Voss, a UJ senior in exercise science, is president of the Samaritan’s Feet UJ Ambassadors. He said it is the largest campus organization. The students embrace a program that does good and involves servitude, he said.

“I find that it’s very humbling to be part of something like this,” Voss said.

People come forward when they are in need and it isn’t taken lightly by the students, he said. This is a big responsibility but a fantastic opportunity to be a part of something bigger than ourselves, he said.

“These little kids are the future so it means a lot to me,” said Jack Talley, a sophomore pre-law student at UJ.

It’s important to help all kids in the community, he said. The bigger impact of doing something meaningful for a child is that the child in turn may remember this and do the same some day, he said.

Sydney Prussia, a sophomore elementary education student at UJ, said she volunteered as a way to do other things that relate to helping kids.

“This is just another reason to help more kids,” Prussia said.

[“source=jamestownsun”]

Sahil Fashion opens new online fashion store

Courtesy: Pakistan DressSahil Fashion & Alterations has unveiled a new online fashion store aimed at Pakistani people living in Australia who want to shop for the best Pakistani clothing. The company already has a showroom in Dandenong near Melbourne and aims to expand business by opening new stores. The company is open to sell products at different outlets in and around Melbourne.

Pakistani Dresses, a firm owned by Sahil Fashion & Alterations, aims to become the first choice for those wanting to shop for Pakistani clothing in Australia. Pakistani Dresses specialises in Pakistani wedding dresses, Pakistani bridal dresses and Afghani dresses in styles, colours and fabrics to suit the tastes of a discerning clientele. Shoppers will find glamorous garments made by some of the most popular and highly sought designers.

The company understands though Pakistani clothing and Afghani dresses are now easily available online, people with a rich taste of styling always crave to wear clothing designed by famous designers like Maria B, Rang Rasiya, Zara Shahjahan and Zainab Chottani to Sobia Nazir, Sana Safinaz, Asim Jofa, Kashees, and Serene Premium.

By offering designer clothing from some of the best known Pakistani labels in the business, the company aims to become the first choice online store for Pakistani clothes in Australia.

Hazaragi dress is another of the in demand clothing type that the store offers. Hazaragi dresses have a charm of their own and are available in rich fabrics, radiant shades and with stylish embroidery, some of which are highlighted with metallic work for shimmer and shine. (SV)

 

[“source=fibre2fashion”]

Now, you can lace new Nike Adapt BB shoes with your smartphone

Now your shoes will automatically loosen or tighten when you step into them. Photo: Nike

Now your shoes will automatically loosen or tighten when you step into them. Photo: Nike

New York: In the 1980s, the Back to the Future film franchise suggested we would all eventually wear self-lacing sneakers. Then a few years ago, Nike made the movie magic a reality, introducing its first shoe to the public with so-called “power lacing.”

And on Tuesday, the global sportswear giant took it a step farther — now your shoes will automatically loosen or tighten when you step into them, and then adapt based on your activity.

Wait for it — the Nike Adapt BB shoes, which go on sale on February 17 for $350 in the United States, are controlled by the touch of a button or a smartphone app.

“We picked basketball as the first sport for Nike Adapt intentionally because of the demands that athletes put on their shoes,” Eric Avar, Nike VP creative director of innovation, said in a statement.

Using a custom motor and gear train, “Adapt” technology enables the shoe to be automatically adjusted to the foot.

The app allows the player to load in different fit preferences — for example, game play versus a timeout.

Boston Celtics forward Jayson Tatum is the first pitchman for the new shoe.

“That the app allows the ability to put the shoe on and touch the button, change the colors, see the percentage on the battery…it’s just cool,” Tatum said in a statement.

Nike says it plans to bring the system to shoes for other sports.

[“source=livemint”]

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer – No, It’s Not Sabyasachi

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer - No, It's Not Sabyasachi

 

After Sabyasachi and The House Of Angadi, Deepika Padukone picked an outfit from the shelves of Anamika Khanna for one of her wedding functions. The designer shared an image of Deepika with her family on her Instagram page and used ‘#weddingfestivities’ in the caption (now edited out) but she did not give away the details of event. In the picture, Deepika Padukone, dressed in an organza outfit, smiled as she hugged her family (in a very Hum Saath-Saath Hain style). Deepika’s sister Anisha, dressed in a chikankari anarkali, looked pretty. Deepika Padukone married actor Ranveer Singh in Italy earlier this month in the presence of their families and close friends. The couple is gearing up for their first Mumbai reception scheduled for November 28.

Anamika Khanna is the third designer Deepika Padukone opted for her wedding festivities, first being her favoured designer Sabyasachi. Deepika also wore a pure zari kanjeevaram saree in gold for the reception, which was a gift by her mother Ujjala Padukone from The House of Angadi. Deepika’s orange and gold saree for the Konkani wedding was also from The House of Angadi.

[“source=ndtv”]

Could social media emerge as a new critical infrastructure sector?

Social media has become an important conduit for official and emergency government communications with the public. With such communications having the power to critically affect national security, social networks have become a hacker’s paradise and need to be taken more seriously.

US President Donald Trump’s official Twitter account is one example of how social media is now a popular channel for engaging with the public in realtime. At the more extreme end of the scale, recent events in Hawaii and Japan saw false missile alerts sent due to human error, causing populations to spiral into turmoil. These incidents highlight how social media accounts are becoming part of the critical infrastructure that governs our day-to-day lives.

It’s clear that communications, or mis-communications, of this kind have the potential to wreak havoc. But the question is: should the use of these social media accounts — like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and more — for official and emergency purposes, be regulated by legislation?

“Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.”

In Australia, telecommunications carriers are subject to the Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms (TSSR), while other critical infrastructure falls under the recently introduced Security of Critical Infrastructure Act (2018). This act is primarily focused on major infrastructure assets like power and water, that supply essential services to more than 100,000 people.

In both the TSSR and the act, scope is given for the relevant minister to direct a provider or intermediary “to do, or not do, a specified thing that is reasonably necessary to protect networks and facilities from national security risks.”

Under the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act, the relevant minister can also nominate additional industry centres for inclusion, provided the minister is satisfied there is a risk that the assets or services could have a prejudicial effect on national security.

Top of the priority list currently are airports and data centres. It’s possible the minister will declare social media communications as subject to the act, but, at this stage, it’s unlikely.

Top-grade cybersecurity practices essential

So, what should governments be doing when it comes to securing social media accounts used for timely or sensitive communications? Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.

Government personnel operating social media for official or emergency purposes should undertake a review of how their accounts are managed. Hardening communication platforms should include stepping up password management practices. This will help eliminate the chance of delays to the delivery of critical information or the exploitation of accounts for nefarious purposes, such as issuing false or misleading information.

“To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged.”

Hackers know the value and vulnerability of social media today, and are already hijacking official accounts. In 2017, a rogue Twitter employee shut down Donald Trump’s Twitter account for 11 minutes in an act of protest.

Disgruntled employees aren’t the only risk – hackers could use any one of several social engineering techniques, such as phishing, to gain access to passwords for social media. If they did so, they’d be able to issue false statements on a public social media account, potentially causing fear and panic.

Government personnel within specific departments or offices commonly share access to social media accounts. This means that potentially dozens of people throughout an agency have access, admin or editing rights on these platforms. Not least, passwords for these accounts are usually shared between team members, rarely changed, and often re-used across a number of accounts.

Any account with a shared or re-used password can be an easy target for a hacker or corrupt insider. There is also rarely a record of which team member published each post — increasing the possibility of a false alert being deliberate and untraceable.

Just two minutes after the missile alert was issued on Twitter in Hawaii, the governor was told it was a false alarm. While other government officials rushed to assure the public there was nothing to worry about, the governor did not tweet for more than 17 minutes. The cause of his silence? He forgot his username and password.

To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged. That way, simple acts of forgetting, sharing or re-using passwords won’t cause delays, such as what happened in Hawaii.

Privileged account security tips

As best practice to properly secure and protect social media accounts, government departments should employ privileged account security, including:

  • Arrange transparent access: To make it harder for hackers to find and exploit credentials, authorised users must be able to seamlessly authenticate access to an account without having to remember passwords. This allows for immediate access in emergency situations, such as the incident in Hawaii.
  • Remove shared credentials: Use a digital vault to store passwords and remove the accountability challenges of shared logins. Users will then need to login individually for access to shared social media platforms.
  • Automate password rotations: Continuously changing privileged credentials safeguards against attackers using retired passwords. Regularly automating password changes can also update access privileges, reducing the possibility of an outsider getting their hands on valid credentials.
  • Review account activity: For visibility of individual users’ activity across social media accounts, a record of events can be created. This way, posts can be linked to authorised users, and rogue employees can be more easily identified.

Governments the world over are reviewing their critical infrastructure safeguards and national security precautions. As we continue to see in situations such as those in the US, Hawaii, and Japan, the public has developed a huge level of trust in communications distributed by government organisations.

Social media has become a credible and dependable medium for official communications, and it’s clear these platforms are neither inherently secure nor infallible. It’s critical to re-think how any medium used for official and emergency communications is treated and secured.

[“source=cnbc”]

Victoria’s Secret Replaces CEO Amid The ThirdLove New York Times Ad

Heidi Zak’s open letter in The New York Times to Victoria’s Secret CMO, Ed Razek.Instagram: @thirdlove

Victoria’s Secret has replaced CEO, Jan Singer, with John Mehas, days after the ThirdLove open letter in the Times in response to Victoria’s Secret CMO, Ed Razek’s, degrading remarks in his recent Vogue interview. Although the ThirdLove letter may have not been the sole reason for change in leadership, it has shed light on the company culture that needs to evolve to better communicate to the modern consumer. With Victoria’s Secret’s sales declining rapidly, the last thing the brand needed was an open letter in the Times criticizing their outdated views on women.

Chief Marketing Officer Ed Razek and Victoria’s Secret models Candice Swanepoel and Adriana Lima during a press conference. (Photo by John Phillips/Invision/AP)John Phillips/Invision/AP

Heidi Zak, CEO of ThirdLove, felt it was her mission to explain why the brand’s male-fantasy marketing tactics, un-inclusive sizing and discriminatory culture has prompted antithesis brands, such as ThirdLove, to grow in the marketplace.

The letter was addressed to Victoria’s Secret on Ed Razek’s appalling commentary and approach towards marketing to women. “You market to men and sell a male fantasy to women. But at ThirdLove, we think beyond, as you said, a “42-minute entertainment special.” Your show may be a “fantasy” but we live in reality. Our reality is that women wear bras in real life as they go to work, breastfeed their children, play sports, care for ailing parents, and serve their country,” said Zak.

Is the disconnect that Victoria’s Secret has between their “fantasy world” and the reality of their consumer to blame for their decline? Zak’s explains how ThirdLove fills in the disconnect between fantasy and reality, “I founded ThirdLove five years ago because it was time to create a better option. ThirdLove is the antithesis of Victoria’s Secret. We believe the future is building a brand for every woman, regardless of her shape, size, age, ethnicity, gender identity, or sexual orientation. This shouldn’t be seen as groundbreaking, it should be the norm.”

[“source=forbes]