YouTuber’s DIY de-crease trick to make old shoes new goes viral – Watch

Things you require to get rid of creases on your shoes: something to stuff your shoes with such as old socks, newspaper or tissue paper, a small towel, an iron and some hot water.

YouTuber's DIY de-crease trick to make old shoes new goes viral - Watch

Many netizens tried the de-creasing trick and shared before and after images of their shoes.  |  Photo Credit: Twitter

Shoes look best when they are new. However, it breaks our heart when they wear out. A YouTuber’s do-it-yourself hack to remove the creases on your old shoes is now going viral.

The video is shared by Shantel Dé Bonsu and here are the things you require: something to stuff your shoes with such as old socks, newspaper or tissue paper, a small towel, an iron and some hot water.

You are now set to make your shoe crease-free again. All you have to do is just follow these simple four steps:

1. Stuff your shoes with old socks or newspaper or tissue paper to the point where you cannot see any more creases on your old pair of shoes. Once, you are done, press on the top of your shoes just to make sure that there’s no space inside.

2. Take a small towel and put it in hot water and then squeeze the water out to make the towel damp.

3. Place the towel on the top of the creases on your shoes.

4. Iron the towel. Make sure that you keep lifting the iron, else you’ll end up burning your shoes.

Keep in mind that the time to get rid of the crease depends on how bad it is. Watch the video here:

Many netizens tried the de-creasing trick and shared before and after images of their shoes

[“source=timesnownews”]

How Fashion Can Make You Feel Confident

Image result for How Fashion Can Make You Feel ConfidentHThere’s nothing better than that feeling of knowing you look good. You might not be turning everyone’s heads, but you know some people are giving you an admiring glance.

You’ve experienced it before when you walked into the office in a new outfit that’s different to your usual dress sense. It might be the first time some people in the building even realized you were there!

What is the secret?

Believe it or not, this feeling has a name. It’s called enclothed cognition. The concept is defined as the influence what you wear has on your psychological processes. It affects several aspects of a person’s overall psychology. These aspects include confidence, performance, and empowerment.

That means that ‘swag’ is an actual thing! The spring in your step when you’re feeling good about what you’re wearing is not imagined at all. What people have been saying for years is correct: when you look good, you feel good.

How do you get the full advantage of your enclothed cognition?

Our forebears said that clothes make the man, but they were only partially correct. Fashion is not as narrow as clothing. It includes accessories like handbags as well as fragrances. Face it, when you smell good, you feel good.

Jewelry is another essential component of fashion and often treated as a status symbol. You can achieve enclothed cognition in your regular clothing while wearing a trendy Rolex Explorer or a blingy diamond bracelet.

So, go ahead and buy yourself some stylish clothes that make you feel good. But don’t forget to accessorize, accessorize, accessorize!

Shopping for optimal enclothed cognition

Here are some tips to help you achieve the highest levels of enclothed cognition the next time you go shopping:

1. Shop alone

You might enjoy going shopping with your friends, but did you know that it cramps your style? Our friends and family tend to be very influential in the decisions we make, and shopping is no exception.

Are you going to treat yourself to those designer shoes when your sister is with you nagging you about spending too much money?

2. Have a sense of who you are

Each person has their style. Your style is a set of fashion choices that make you feel good about yourself.

It might not always conform with all the latest fashion trends. Have a sense of what suits you, what makes you look good, and what makes you feel confident. Put your stamp on every outfit you wear.

3. Play around with fashion

Fashion is all about experimentation and personalizing your style. Combining different elements creates new outfits that are eye-catching. Part of expressing yourself through fashion is showing who you are and what a unique individual you are.

Don’t be afraid to experiment; it’s the best part of it all. Sometimes going against the grain is the best approach, if that’s your style, of course.

4. Don’t save it all for a special occasion

Shop for work, play, and formal clothes equally. There’s no point in only feeling good when you go to work but not when you go for a run. Spread your shopping across all aspects of your life. The more enclothed cognition you experience, the better your self-image will be.

5. Shop smart

You don’t need to be dressed from top to toe in fashionwear that makes you feel good about yourself. A pair of shoes alone can give you that confidence boost you need.

Instead of spending a fortune on one ensemble, shop for clothes and accessories that you can add to your regular wardrobe. Then you get to feel enclothed cognition more frequently.

[“source=thriveglobal”]

New shoes make a difference

Image result for New shoes make a differenceChildren sat attentive in rows of chairs with parents behind them as a college student washed their feet and exchanged kind words before putting a new sneaker on each foot.

More than 60 University of Jamestown students greeted area families that registered for the Samaritan’s Feet distribution day event Sunday at Harold Newman Arena. The UJ students collected 275 pairs of new shoes over the first semester and from direct donations and at a UJ basketball game.

“In retrospect it’s been a lot of work but it doesn’t seem like work, it really doesn’t,” said Mika Thorlakson, a UJ professor of kinesiology and program adviser.

The UJ students were moved by the idea of collecting and distributing shoes for kids, some of whom have never had a new pair, he said. Active and growing kids go through a lot of shoes which puts a burden on parents, he said.

The kids and parents were led to a feet washing station and the youth were fitted with new shoes. The kids were then invited to play games with UJ students on the arena floor.

Charles Eastman of Jamestown said he and his wife were grateful to have a new pair of shoes for their 9-year-old daughter. She goes through a lot of clothing, especially jackets and shoes, and any help is appreciated, he said.

“Anytime we can get some type of help it makes things a lot easier on us,” Eastman said.

Jeremy and Justina Jones said their 8-year-old twin boys are active and go through shoes fast.

“It’s great that they provide this help for children,” Justina said. “I just think it’s a great program.”

Denise Blomberg, regional operations director of the Samaritan’s Feet in Sioux Falls, S.D., said Jamestown has a culture of service and the servant leadership example is exemplified at the university. It’s a community that is aligned well with the organizational goal of giving out a million shoes this year, she said.

“This is a natural progression for us to start the Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors chapter here,” Blomberg said. “This is the first of its kind and it can be replicated anywhere.”

Samaritan’s Feet was founded in 2003 by Manny Ohonme, who came to the University of North Dakota-Lake Region on a basketball scholarship and went on to earn a master’s degree. As a youth in Nigeria, the gift of his first pair of shoes from a missionary at age 9 changed his life.

The UJ Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors is a first-of-its-kind model that may soon be used at other colleges and communities that form their own chapters, Blomberg said. The UJ students collected more than 200 pairs of shoes in 2018 but had not yet formed the Samaritan’s Feet Ambassadors chapter.

Sunday’s event was rescheduled from a weather-cancelled event on Jan. 26. When the UJ totals are known they will be added to the other events in 15 cities and 12 states when more than 9,000 pairs of shoes were given to children as part of the Martin Luther King National Day of Service Initiative, she said.

More than 6,500 pairs of shoes have been distributed at events in seven North Dakota cities since 2014, she said. More than 6.9 million shoes have been distributed in 41 states in that time.

Tommy Voss, a UJ senior in exercise science, is president of the Samaritan’s Feet UJ Ambassadors. He said it is the largest campus organization. The students embrace a program that does good and involves servitude, he said.

“I find that it’s very humbling to be part of something like this,” Voss said.

People come forward when they are in need and it isn’t taken lightly by the students, he said. This is a big responsibility but a fantastic opportunity to be a part of something bigger than ourselves, he said.

“These little kids are the future so it means a lot to me,” said Jack Talley, a sophomore pre-law student at UJ.

It’s important to help all kids in the community, he said. The bigger impact of doing something meaningful for a child is that the child in turn may remember this and do the same some day, he said.

Sydney Prussia, a sophomore elementary education student at UJ, said she volunteered as a way to do other things that relate to helping kids.

“This is just another reason to help more kids,” Prussia said.

[“source=jamestownsun”]

Verily wants to make smart shoes that track weight and falls

Photo by Andy Buchanan / WPA Pool/ Getty Images

Google’s sister company Verily wants to make a smart shoe that can track weight and monitor falls, according to CNBC. The company has allegedly been looking for partners to develop this shoe and bring it to market, but it’s very early in the process.

Fall detection seems to have become an increasingly popular feature for wellness gadgets, given that the newest Apple Watch has a similar feature. This makes sense due to the growing number of Baby Boomers and the very real risk of injury that falls pose. In fact, falls are the number one cause of injuries and deaths from injury for elderly Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and preventing falls truly could save lives.

The shoe fits in with other projects from Verily (formerly Google Life Sciences), which include contact lenses for farsightedness and a special spoon for people with movement disorders. That said, Verily is hardly the first company to look into smart shoes for this purpose. E-VONE makes smart shoes in 26 styles, and all of them contain sensors that will notify someone when you fall. But both E-VONE and Verily and everyone else’s smart shoes will need to contend with the same problems: few people want to wear the same shoes every day, and many people don’t wear shoes indoors. At least a smart shoe is a better fall-prevention idea than the $800 airbag belt.

[“source=theverge”]