Luxury Apparels Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.3% Research Report by Top Players, Gross Margin, Profit Margin, Revenue, Forecast 2023

Luxury Apparels

“Latest Market Overview for Luxury Apparels Market Research Report 2018-2023 with CAGR 12.3%

Global Luxury Apparels Market Report 2018 provides actionable intelligence on factors that have been driving demand; key trends that are impacting the Luxury Apparels marketchallenges that affect the market dynamics along with the market size, a SWOT analysis of the key vendors, and various segments.

Competitor Analysis: by product types, market share, applications, sales, and revenue.

  • Hermès International S.A -Versace-Kering SA-Prada S.P.A-Dolce and Gabbana-LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton S.E-Burberry Group Inc.-Giorgio Armani S.P.A-Ralph Lauren Corporation-Ermenegildo Zegna-Hugo Boss A.G-Kiton

Get Sample Copy of this Report https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/request-sample/13104780

Description of Luxury Apparels Market: Increasing communication between consumers and key players through social media platform and online retail stores is driving the sales of latest trendy luxury apparels. Rise in online transactions are supporting the market growth of luxury apparels from last few years. Consumers specific offers and attractive promotions & advertising through magazine and social media is influencing the sales of luxury apparels as nearly half of luxury apparel buying decisions are majorly inclined by what consumers see or hear from offline and online platforms.

The global luxury apparels market is expected to register a CAGR of 12.3% during the forecast period, 2018 to 2023.

Acceptance of Latest Fashion Trends by millennial to Drive the Luxury Apparels Market Growth

Luxury apparels are mostly considered as status symbols for individuals which is driving discretionary spending with high purchasing power of consumers. Increasing popularity of luxury apparels among millennial are driving the market growth as they are more likely to be driven by latest fashion trend than other consumers groups. Improvement in digital marketing and rise in use of digital media in developing economies for product marketing are playing key role to drive the luxury apparels market growth from last few years. For instance, popular fashion brands like Topshop, Burberry and Alexander McQueen showed their use of live streaming with the help of digital runways at the SS 2017 fashion month.

Online Channel Expected to Witness Rapid Growth

The luxury apparels market is led by e-commerce i.e. online retail stores segment as consumers are preferring the online platforms over store based retail stores. Online platforms provide more options to choose and it is convenient for consumers. Many key players in luxury apparels are focusing on marketing and selling products on both their own website and that of selected retail store or pure luxury e-retailer partners in particular countries. Marketing strategies such as involvement of celebrity for brand endorsement is helping key players to attract more consumers from different financial backgrounds. As offline retail stores have limited growth potential over online retail stores, it is likely to influence sales of luxury apparels in online retail stores in upcoming years.

North America to Dominate the Luxury Apparels Market Share

North America is likely to hold significant market share in luxury apparels industry followed by Europe region over the forecast period due to increased demand of luxury goods including luxury apparels in the region. The growing attraction of luxury lifestyle, high purchasing power, and the influence of celebrity endorsement is driving the market growth in North America. Asia-Pacific region is estimated to witness significant growth rate in upcoming years owing to improving distribution network across the region. However, value added taxes imposed on luxury apparels and footwear by governments and high dominance of key players is restraining the market growth in developing economies.

Key Developments in the Luxury Apparels Market

July 2018: Reliance Brands has acquired 12.5% of stake in luxury apparel firm Future101 Design for USD 1.385 million. Future101 is engaged in manufacturing, distribution and sale of luxury apparels in India.
Jun 2018: Luxury women’s apparel retailer Moda Operandi recently launched Moda Operandi Man, marking the first time the e-retailer has sold men’s apparel. Moda Operandi Man debuted with more than 50 luxury brands, including Prada, Maison Margiela, Givenchy, Ralph Lauren, Balmain and Burberry, among others.

Luxury Apparels Market Competitive Landscape

Luxury Apparels Market

Reasons to Purchase Luxury Apparels Market ReportAnalyzing outlook of the market with the recent trends and Porter’s five forces analysisMarket dynamics, which essentially consider the factors, which are impelling the present market scenario, along with growth opportunities of the market in the years to comeMarket segmentation analysis including qualitative and quantitative research incorporating the impact of economic and non-economic aspectsRegional and country level analysis integrating the demand and supply forces that are influencing the growth of the marketCompetitive landscape involving the market share of major players, along with the key strategies adopted for development in the past five yearsComprehensive company profiles covering the product offerings, key financial information, recent developments, SWOT analysis, and strategies employed by the major market players3-month analyst supports, along with the Market Estimates sheet in excel

Order a copy of Luxury Apparels Market Report 2018 @ https://www.360researchreports.com/purchase/13104780

The Global demand for Luxury Apparels Market is forecast to report strong development driven by consumption in major evolving markets. More growth opportunities to come up between 2018 and 2025 compared to a few years ago, signifying the rapid pace of change.

Following market aspects are enfolded in Global Luxury Apparels Market Report:

  1. A wide summarization of the Global Luxury Apparels Market.
  2. The present and forecasted regional market size data based on applications, types, and regions.
  3. Market trends, drivers and challenges for the Global Luxury Apparels Market.
  4. Analysis of company profiles of Top major players functioning in the market.

Luxury Apparels Market report passes on a fundamental overview of the Market including its definition, applications, and advancement. Furthermore, the Industry report investigates the ecumenical Major Luxury Apparels Market players in detail. Luxury Apparels Market report gives key bits of Cautiousness and subsisting status of the Players and is a basic Source obviously and heading for Companies and people energized by the Industry.

Inquire more or share questions if any for this Report @ https://www.360researchreports.com/enquiry/pre-order-enquiry/13104780

Which are the important factors that are mentioned in the Luxury Apparels Market report 2023?

  • Key Market Dynamics: The Global Luxury Apparels Market research report provides complete forecasts on the latest market trends, development methods, and research methodologies. Some of the factors that are directly in affecting the market including the Strategic Production and Methods, development platforms, and the product model itself, and even a minute change within the product profile would result in huge amount of changes within the mentioned factors. All of these factors are explained in detail in the research study.
  • Major Growth Prospects:The report also focuses on some of the Key growth prediction, including new product launches, Mergers and Acquisitions, Research and Development, joint ventures, collaborations, agreements, partnerships, and growth of the key Manufacturers working effectively in the market, both in terms of regional and global scale depending on geography.
  • Key Market Highlights: The report gives us an in-depth Market analysis on some of the Luxury Apparels Market key factors, including revenue, cost, capacity, capacity utilization rate, production, production rate, consumption, supply, demand, Market share, CAGR, and gross margin. Additionally, the report presents a comprehensive study of the market growth factors and their latest trends, along with related Market sections and subsections.

Browse Detailed TOC, Tables, Figures, Charts, and Companies Mentioned in this Market Research Report @ https://360researchreports.com/Luxury Apparels-13104780

The growth of this market worldwide is subjected to various factors; including consumer world-class Luxury Apparels Market of many Luxury Apparels Market products, inorganic company growth models, price volatility of raw materials, product innovation along with economic prospects in both producer and consumer countries.

Conclusively, this report will provide you a clear view of each fact of the market without a need to refer to any other research report or a data source. Our report will provide you with all the facts about the past, present, and future of the concerned Market.

Sustainable students: How easy is it to be more environmentally-friendly?

Helen and Will

Plastics challenge

The students were challenged to reduce their plastic use by 75%, which they found difficult.

“It’s hard when you’re on a student budget, getting anything not wrapped in plastic is so much more expensive,” Amy explained.

Plastics guru Lucy Siegle gave them a helping hand, swapping their countless shower bottles for sustainable versions of shampoo, toothpaste and soap bars.

She also gave them reusable items like coffee cups and cutlery and told them to change their shopping habits.

Image caption Amy Fitzgerald and Jay Maheswaran were tasked with reducing their use of plastics

But Amy said they found supermarkets a particular problem as “everything was wrapped in plastic”.

“And going to the butcher’s was more expensive than getting pre-packaged stuff,” she added.

At the start of the week, Ms Siegle weighed the plastic in the students’ home, which totalled 2.8lb (1.3kg) – a figure she described as “rather a lot”.

With her advice, the students reduced it to 1.5lb.

Image caption Ms Siegle was not pleased with the house’s reliance on clingfilm, and confiscated their roll

“I’m still really pleased with them,” she said. “Especially as when I saw all the bottles they [initially] had in their bathroom, I nearly gave up.”

Ms Siegle said she thought the group had adopted the mindset shift really quickly, experiencing outrage over everything being plastic.

She urged them to be more militant by unwrapping products at the supermarket checkout and leaving the plastic behind to make the point.

“We need to take a stand,” she said.

Fashion challenge

Marcus Rudd, one of the housemates, had hoped that his shopping habits – buying 10 to 15 T-shirts a year, combined with some designer pieces – were environmentally friendly.

Then he learned that it took 3,000 litres of water on average to make only one T-shirt.

The fashion industry – which makes 100 billion garments each year – is a major contributor to greenhouse gases, water pollution, air pollution and the overuse of water.

Image caption Marcus was won over by charity and vintage shops, picking out this striking jacket

It is exacerbated, MPs say, by so-called “fast fashion” – inexpensive clothing produced rapidly by mass-market retailers.

Sustainable stylist Alice Wilby taught the students to reuse, repair and recycle, encouraging them to swap fast fashion for second-hand.

She challenged Marcus and his housemate Goby Chan, who regularly buys clothes she does not wear, to make a new outfit from old clothes to model at London Fashion Week.

“We buy so much stuff and half of it sits unworn in the back of the wardrobe,” Ms Wilby said.

“Before we buy anything else it’s great to see what you’ve already got, and fall back in love with your things.”

Image caption Marcus and Goby modelled recycled clothes for a Mother of Pearl show at London Fashion Week

Goby enjoyed the challenge. “I was shocked by what you can do by reusing a garment and making it into something new which is actually really fashionable. I actually love it.”

  • The students modelling recycled clothes
  • Quiz: Are your clothes damaging the environment?
  • The students with a food waste problem

And Ms Wilby said they did well.

“Considering Marcus had never set foot in a second-hand shop before – and thought they were smelly places with clothes you would never want to buy – by the end of the week he was finding pieces he really loved. That was a really great victory.

“These two shop a lot, and over the past month [since the challenge] he has only bought one item.”

Energy challenge

The students took dramatic action to reduce their energy usage – and it worked.

They used much less heating – switching it off at night; wearing jumpers, coats and blankets; and generally keeping the house a little bit cooler.

It made a huge difference to their gas usage – cutting it by a whopping 48%.

They also lowered their electricity usage by 15%. This added up to a 44% carbon saving – around a tonne of carbon in all.

“It was a massive effort – it was freezing in our house,” said Marcus Golby.

Image caption The students were able to drastically cut their home’s energy bills

“[Before] we weren’t communicating when things were going on and going off, so you ended up with the heating on the majority of the time,” explained Amy.

“This month we’re having more of a balance of keeping warm and keeping the heating off when we’re out.”

Dr Rosie Robison, an energy expert from Anglia Ruskin University, said it raised wider questions on whether the focus should be on individuals using less energy or the “wider responsibilities for landlords or homeowners, housebuilders and government for thinking about how our homes can require less fossil fuel in the first place”.

Food challenge

A third of all food made for human consumption is wasted every year – costing the average UK family £700 each year, estimates suggest.

The students were challenged to cut their food waste by 50% and move to the planetary health diet – a plant-based diet with small amounts of meat and fish.

Image caption Helen and Will cooked vegetable bolognese for the house, as part of adopting the planetary health diet for a week

Dr Elliot Woolley, a senior lecturer in sustainable manufacturing at Loughborough University, encouraged them to store their food more carefully to stop it becoming spoiled, plan their meals and prepare the right amount of food for the people eating.

He said that they found the challenge hard, but had reduced their food waste from 8.1lb to 6.8lb, which he described as “a fairly small reduction”.

Image caption The contents of the students’ food waste bin, before the challenge

Dr Woolley added: “One of the things it shows is even when you’re aware of the problem and you’re trying to reduce waste, it’s so ingrained into how we waste and use food that actually we continue with these large amounts.”

Housemate Will Smith said their waste totals were boosted by food bought before the challenge which had started to go off, but admitted: “I don’t think we did too well.”

But he said it had changed his mindset and he would continue trying not to waste food in future.

The Sustainable Students series was produced and directed by Owen Kean and Tom Yeates, with research by Curtis Gallant and Simon O’Leary.

[“source-“bbc”]

ZION WILLIAMSON BLOWN OUT NIKE SHOE IS MISSING … The $250,000 Mystery!!!

No one seems to know the location of Zion Williamson‘s infamous blown-out Nike sneaker — not Zion, not Duke, not even Nike … and it’s a huge problem considering it’s worth around $250,000!!!

Of course, Zion exploded his left PG 2.5 PE sneaker during the Feb. 20 game against North Carolina — injuring his knee in the process. Thankfully, he’s better now.

But, what happened next? Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski has said Nike reps came out to Durham and inspected the shoe in hopes of identifying the problem. But, it’s unclear who has the shoe now.

So, when we spotted Zion and his Duke teammates in Washington, D.C. the other day, we asked the 18-year-old straight up … who’s got the shoe?

Zion smiled and told us, “Uh, ask coach about ’em.”

So, we did! We hit up the Duke athletic dept., and a rep told us they have no idea where the shoes ended up.

Next call was to Nike — maybe they have the shoe, right?

A Nike rep told us, “I don’t have any information [on the location of the shoe].”

WHY HAS THIS BECOME SUCH A MYSTERY?!!

Our next call was to Ken Goldin from Goldin Auctions — one of the leading sellers of sports memorabilia in the world. He just sold some of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar‘s prized mementos for almost $3 MILLION!

Ken told us the shoes are INSANELY collectible — and could fetch more than $250,000 on the open market!!

In fact, Ken believes the blown out shoe plus the matching intact sneaker are “the most famous pair of sneakers in the world, period. End of story.”

Which brings us back to the original question … WHERE ARE THE SHOES?!

[“source=tmz”]

Alia Bhatt’s designer anarkali is just perfect for a mehandi celebration

Alia-Bhatt

Alia Bhatt has been very busy promoting Kalank lately, and today seems to have been no different for the actor. This afternoon, the star was spotted spreading word about her upcoming film once again on the sets of a reality show. Her pick for the outing was a pretty peach anarkali by Anita Dongre. Bhatt accessorised her look with a pair of silver earrings by Minerali and gold heels. Accompanying her at Kalank‘s most recent event were co-stars Varun Dhawan and Sonakshi Sinha. While the former complemented Bhatt’s pastel look with a soft pink kurta, the latter played with prints in Anamika Khanna separates. If you’ve been on the lookout for a peach wedding-ready look, however, Bhatt’s anarkali is the one you need to check out.

Alia Bhatt’s designer anarkali is for every woman who loves soothing hues

If you’ve been keeping up with Alia Bhatt’s recent sartorial choices, you would know that keeping her on-screen character’s look in mind, the star has been dressing largely in Indian ethnic wear for Kalank‘s promotional rounds. While the first look of Kalank had Bhatt dressing in a white Manish Malhotraanarkali, the launch of its song ‘First Class’ saw her meeting fans in a striking black Anita Dongre kurta. Her latest anarkali featured delicate embroidery and a lightweight tulle dupatta that made it perfect for a day event like a mehandi party, or even a poolside engagement celebration. Bhatt went the elegant route with her beauty look and opted for lightly kohled eyes, glossy lips, dewy makeup and freshly blowdried hair. A pastel ensemble like Alia Bhatt’s is a refreshing addition to your festive wardrobe if you’re bored of bold jewel tones. Get something similar for yourself today!

Image: Viral Bhayani

[“source=vogue”]

How Australian theatre is failing its sound designers and composers

A white middle-aged man in a theatre, with a guitar and headphones, frowning

“In the last couple of years, I’ve seen a lot of my colleagues drop out of the industry; a lot of them burn out and suffer serious mental health crises,” Edmondson told the ABC.

“David White’s letter resonated with me. We’re not far off that situation happening in Australia and I’ve seen people come uncomfortably close to that kind of point in their life because of the pressure in the job, and lack of understanding and support.”

Two jobs for the price of one

“Sound and composition … has the ability to truly creep its way into the back of the minds of the audience and help shape their engagement with the play, without being particularly overt. I think that’s a lot of the reason why it’s often overlooked,” Edmondson says.

Sound designers are responsible for all the sound elements in a production, from sound effects and mic-ing up performers to setting up speaker systems.

Edmondson, whose recent credits include Sydney Theatre Company’s award-winning six-hour epic The Harp In The South (sound designer, working with composer The Sweats) and Blackie Blackie Brown(assistant sound designer, to designer/composer Steve Toulmin), says sound designers often resort to unexpected sounds to achieve the desired effect.

In Blackie Blackie Brown, for example, Edmondson had to ask himself: “What is the sound of a giant pair of testicles exploding? … You’ve got to get creative.”

One solution? The “mating cry of foxes” — which when slowed-down sounds “low and haunting”.

A grey-haired middle-aged man with headphones around his neck gazes moodily into the cameraPHOTO: Stefan Gregory is a composer and sound designer who has been working in Australian theatre for 15 years. (ABC Arts: Teresa Tan)

Composers, meanwhile, write and arrange music for a production — but in today’s theatre, the roles of composer and sound designer are often combined.

Stefan Gregory, who won Best Sound Design at this year’s Sydney Theatre Awards for his work on The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui (STC), is a composer and sound designer who has been working in Australian theatre for 15 years.

Gregory says the trend towards combining the two roles emerged within the last 10 years, as composers increasingly began to work electronically.

To hear this story and all the latest stories from stages across the country and beyond, subscribe to The Stage Show.

“The composition/sound design is expected to be fed actively into the room right through the rehearsal process,” Edmondson says.

After the day’s rehearsal, the sound designer/composer writes and mixes the music before programming it into the software. Then (hopefully) the director approves — or they’re forced to go back to the drawing board.

“Once you hit the theatre [for tech week] … you tend to come in for a 9am start and you’ll tend to work through till the theatre closes, which is generally 11pm. But larger productions you might not be out the door until midnight,” says Edmondson.

“If you’re a composer, you go home and sometimes rewrite a whole piece of music and you might be up to 3 or 4am and then back into the theatre early again.”

Gregory concurs, saying that in the final weeks of rehearsals he often works between 90 to 100-hour weeks.

And it’s not just the hours that are taxing.

“You’ve got to put your soul into this music — with the knowledge that someone’s going to listen to it for about three seconds and go ‘Nup, that’s not right’,” he says.

He estimates the ratio of music abandoned as opposed to used in the production as 10:1.

“The sound designers and composers I know all work extraordinarily hard and kill themselves, pretty much.”

Living ‘hand-to-mouth’

J David Franzke is a Melbourne-based Green Room Award-winning sound designer and composer who has worked in the industry for 25 years. Last year, he worked on Melbourne Theatre Company’s production of The Architect; currently he is working on Malthouse’s forthcoming production of Cloudstreet.

“If you’re working as a sound designer in live theatre you’re doing it as a passion. It’s not a sensible career choice,” Franzke says.

A middle-aged white man sits at a desk working on his computer, a dog in his lapPHOTO: Franzke describes his financial circumstances as “hand-to-mouth”. (ABC RN: Hannah Reich)

“I feel like I’ve spent the best part of 25 years with my nose down, tail up, just boring along working. I’ve popped out the other side and gone: ‘Oh! Where are all the things you’re meant to have when you’re almost 50?’ Like a house or a car, I don’t have any of that.”

Franzke works for 6-week blocks at a time on shows.

He describes his financial circumstances as “hand-to-mouth”.

Edmondson says he’s able to make a living wage but that he puts his “hourly rate for theatre work at between $15 and $18 per hour”. In his Facebook post, he said: “The janitors make more money out of my shows than I do (no shade to janitors, of course).”

Gregory says the hourly rate for being both composer and sound designer is “not good”, and says he chooses to work for companies that pay on the higher end of the industry’s spectrum.

“I will be going back to finding work as computer programmer this year — despite being one of the most in-demand in my field and having plenty of shows offered to me in Australia and overseas — because I want more free time to work on projects that are meaningful to me.”

The changing scope of sound design

A hand with wedding ring and watch adjusting knobs on a sound deskPHOTO: Sound design has changed significantly in the last 10 years. (ABC Arts: Teresa Tan)

“Sound designers/composers are paid a flat fee and that hasn’t really changed much at all in the last 10 years,” Edmonson says.

“It’s been fairly static — as have most of the fees of other creative departments — but unlike other departments, sound design has changed a lot in its scope in that time.”

With the rise of prestige TV, theatre audiences have come to expect more complex and immersive sound design, and technology has emerged that can realise that.

These developments have meant that delivery time for work has been cut down while tech costs have gone up. Edmondson says sound professionals need between $10-20,000 worth of equipment to start out in the industry.

Inequity in the industry

In order to remedy “the significant gender inequity” in the industry, Theatre Networks Australia has compiled a list of female, non-binary, and trans designers.

But one woman who has been working regularly in Australian theatre as a sound designer and composer is Kim “Busty Beatz” Bowers, with recent credits including cabaret show Hot Brown Honey and The Longest Minute (a co-production by Queensland Theatre and JUTE Theatre Company).

A black woman with a mic singing in front of a laptop on stage.PHOTO: Sound designer and composer Kim “Busty Beatz” Bowers says the theatre industry is not conducive to being a mother. (Supplied: Sean Young)

“I’m a mother and the theatre is not very conducive to that — especially [the role] of a sound artist. It’s a lot of late nights, and I wouldn’t say that I’m treated that great,” Bowers says.

“The last project I did seven drafts … a lot of that is hours that aren’t paid for,” she adds.

And it’s not just late nights that Bowers has to contend with.

“[I deal with] attitudes, ideas that because you’re a black woman, a woman of colour, that you’re only going to have a certain skill base, that you only work in a certain way … insidious stuff that is full-on.”

Better pay, recognition and education

While other designers in theatre are represented by the Australian Production Design Guild, Edmondson says sound designers are lacking specific union representation to advocate for change.

Yet, the time might be ripe for change.

“With all the cultural shift that we’re seeing in theatre at the moment surrounding safe spaces, mental health, appropriate behaviour and inclusion … I think that’s really opened the door for more honest, frank conversations,” says Edmonson.

“I’m seeing people really suffering from being overwhelmed and burnt out by this workload and … there’s such a small pool already in the industry to begin with, we just can’t afford to lose these people.”

The answer for Edmondson is better pay, improved mental health support, and bringing composers and sound designers on board earlier in the production process.

All of the practitioners interviewed for this piece feel that raising awareness is a crucial part of effecting change.

“It is about actually recognising the workload and recognising the number of hours [involved],” says Bowers.

Gregory says: “I think what’s really happening for the role is that it’s just become a lot more work than it used to be 10 years ago, and I think theatre companies haven’t really caught up … I find that I have to explain my role to pretty much every theatre company I work for.”

 

 

[“source=abc.net.au”]

Bebe Rexha can’t find a designer to dress her for the red carpet: ‘My size 8 ass is still going to the Grammys’

Bebe Rexha can’t find a designer to dress her for the Grammy Awards next month — because she is “too big.”

The singer, who is nominated in the Best New Artist and Best Country Duo/Group Performance categories, took to social media on Monday to explain her predicament three weeks before music’s big night, revealing she’s struggling to find an outfit.

“A lot of times artists will go and talk to designers, and they’ll make them custom dresses to walk the red carpet…” the Meant to Be star says in a video posted to Instagram. “I had my team hit out a lot of designers, and a lot of them do not want to dress me because I’m too big.

Bebe Rexha attends the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show at Pier 94 on November 8, 2018 in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images

“If a size 6/8 is too big then I don’t know what to tell you. Then I don’t want to wear your fking dresses… To all the people that said that I’m thick… fk you, I don’t want to wear your fking dresses.”

Bebe captioned the video: “Im sorry, I had to get this off my chest. If you don’t like my fashion style or my music that’s one thing. But don’t say you can’t dress someone that isn’t a runway size. We are beautiful any size! Small or large! Anddddd My size 8 a is still going to the Grammys.”

She isn’t the first real-size celebrity to speak out about the red carpet snobbery surrounding designers refusing to dress certain body types — comedian Leslie Jones took aim at the fashionistas when she couldn’t find anyone to dress her for the Ghostbusters premiere in 2016 — she took to Twitter to voice her disdain, writing: “It’s so funny how there are no designers wanting to help me with a premiere dress for movie. Hmmm that will change and I remember everything.”

She refused to name the designers she reached out to, but Christian Siriano stepped forward and offered to dress her, stating: “I love Leslie and can’t wait to make her something fabulous to wear. I dress and support women of all ages and sizes.”

Embedded video

Bebe Rexha

@BebeRexha

Im sorry, I had to get this off my chest. If you don’t like my fashion style or my music that’s one thing. But don’t say you can’t dress someone that isn’t a runway size. We are beautiful any size! Small or large! Anddddd My size 8 ass is still going to the Grammys. #LOVEYOURBODY

46.8K

11:48 PM – Jan 21, 2019
14.4K people are talking about this
[“source=nationalpost”]
0

Comments

Join the conversation