Amazon is using Prime Day this year to try to win in fashion

On the morning of June 25, mega-fashion influencer Arielle Charnas, who’s collected more than 1.2 million followers on Instagram and has her own clothing line Something Navy at Nordstrom, announced when Amazon’s Prime Day would be kicking off this year.

It was a not-so-subtle signal about what Amazon hopes to accomplish with its annual deals extravaganza this year. It still wants to be a bigger name in fashion.

When you think of Prime Day, you might be thinking about deals on Instant Pots and Amazon Echo devices — not half-off dresses and designer heels.

But the market for apparel and accessories globally is worth more than $1 trillion, so Amazon clearly sees there’s a lot at stake here. It’s using Prime Day to tout fashion deals. And it’s also had a slew of recent initiatives and tie-ups with fashion influencers — beyond Charnas — to show it’s trying to establish the site as a place to shop for more than just the basics. It hopes to take market share as other apparel retailers are struggling. And it hasn’t been afraid to experiment.

Typically, when it comes to selling clothes, Amazon is really good at “the boring stuff,” Wells Fargo retail analyst Ike Boruchow said.

Wells Fargo has estimated that Amazon generated roughly $35 billion in sales in 2018 related to apparel and footwear, out of $232.9 billion in sales overall. For context, athletic apparel retailer Lululemon brought in $3.3 billion in sales last year, while Gap Inc.’s net sales were $16.6 billion, and Costco has said it generated $7 billion in sales in 2018 from clothes and footwear. Amazon dwarfs them all, even combined.

But a lot of those transactions for Amazon stem from “commoditized” clothing items like white T-shirts, jeans and underwear, according to Boruchow. Amazon’s in-house brand, AmazonEssentials, is popular for that sort of thing — selling a four-pack of women’s camisoles for $24.50, or a 10-pack of cotton crew socks for kids for $9.45.

Bezos’ vision for fashion

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos frequently told colleagues in the early 2000s: “In order to be a two-hundred-billion-dollar company, we’ve got to learn how to sell clothes and food,” according to the book profiling Amazon’s ascent, written by Brad Stone, called “The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon.” At that time, Bezos set his benchmark based on the size of Walmart’s sales, Stone said.

Amazon surpassed $200 billion in annual sales for the first time in 2018. That figure includes revenues from its other businesses like Amazon Web Services, not just retail. Meanwhile, Walmart’s total revenue was $514.4 billion for its latest fiscal year.

Amazon is trying to sell more fashionable clothes today as mall-based apparel retailers like Victoria’s Secret, Chico’s, Dressbarn-owner Ascena Retail Groupand Forever 21 are closing stores and struggling to draw-in shoppers. And department store chains like J.C. Penney and Macy’s, which have historically been reliant on their apparel businesses to drive sales growth, are shrinking. It’s been estimated retail store closure announcements could reach 12,000 this year, setting a record, with many of those stemming from apparel-based businesses like Charming Charlie and Charlotte Russe.

This Prime Day, which kicked off Monday at 3 a.m. ET and runs for 48 hours, will put Amazon’s latest efforts to be a bigger fashion destination to the test.

Lessons from Prime Day

Prime Day 2019 will include hot deals on staple items, like sweatshirts and socks, but also is promoting Amazon’s own fashionable items to highlight the range of clothing it offers.

Ahead of Prime Day this year, Amazon was pushing deals for as much as 50% off leggings, accessories and more, Jacquelyn Cooley at analytical intelligence company 1010data said. Fashion items very well could be on the top sellers list this year, considering how the deals are panning out, she said.

h/o: amazon fashion homepage on prime day
On Prime Day, Amazon is touting 30% off Calvin Klein and deals on some of its own exclusive apparel merchandise.

On Monday morning, button-down shirts from Amazon’s Goodthreads line were 30% off, its own Lark & Ro dresses were 50% off, and certain Calvin Klein and Adidas merchandise was 30% off. Charnas took to social media again to tout her #PrimeDayPicks, including items from Amazon Essentials, Splendid and Rebecca Taylor.

Overall, this year’s Prime Day could bring in as much as $5.8 billion in sales globally, up from an estimated $3.9 billion in sales in 2018, when the event ran for just 36 hours, according to Coresight Research.

Beyond Prime Day

But a fashion business isn’t built on a two-day sales event. Amazon has seemingly been amassing an army of fashion influencers on social platforms like Instagram, bringing with them tens of millions of followers altogether, to write posts with taglines like “I #FoundItOnAmazon.”

Women including Paola Alberdi, Sierra Furtado, Emi Suzuki, Leonie Hanne and Patricia Bright each have more than 1 million followers on Instagram. Now, they all share something else in common. They’re working with Amazon to promote the platform as a fashion destination — alongside their posts about Reformation, Revolve, Channel, Rebecca Minkoff, and other trendy and luxury labels.

One of Amazon’s new influencer-focused ventures called “The Drop” went live in May.

With The Drop, Amazon is partnering with fashion influencers like Bright, a U.K.-based vlogger known for posting chic looks and night-out outfits to her Instagram, and Furtado, an LA-based YouTuber known for her more laid-back style. These partners are designing limited-edition apparel and accessories collections that Amazon will then create in-house.

There’s a scarcity element involved because shoppers are only given 30 hours to shop each influencer’s collection before the next one is dropped. A text alert notifies shoppers when a drop is happening. Amazon also says on its website it only makes limited quantities of each drop, so products are expected to sell out.

The Drop sounds a lot like fast-fashion retailer Zara’s strategy, which has found success by never making the same thing twice, only shipping limited quantities of items to stores, and rotating inventory frequently to keep shoppers coming back again and again to flip through racks of clothes. Amazon appears to be taking its own stab at this approach.

In order to be a two-hundred-billion-dollar company, we’ve got to learn how to sell clothes and food.
Jeff Bezos
AMAZON CEO

Amazon also has its own subscription box program akin to Stitch Fix called Prime Wardrobe, where users can pick out a handful of clothing items, try them on at home and then only pay for what they want to keep, shipping back what they don’t want.

And just last month it launched an artificial intelligence tool called “StyleSnap.” Within Amazon’s app, users can either take a photo or upload an existing image of an outfit, and StyleSnap will use machine learning to “match the look” with clothes for sale on Amazon.

Making shopping fun

Still, analysts and fashion experts agree that navigating Amazon’s website for clothes often is more arduous than it is enjoyable. The website’s design isn’t desirable for discovering new things or new brands. Most people shopping on Amazon go there knowing exactly what they’re looking for. With fashion, Amazon must figure out how to make the experience more fun.

There’s also reluctance for brands to partner with Amazon because they lose autonomy over pricing and marketing, founders have told CNBC.

On the whole, it hasn’t been easy for Amazon to entice popular fashion brands to sell there. The majority of product listings on Amazon’s fashion page are from third parties. This is likely one of the reasons why Amazon has been incubating so many of its own apparel and accessories lines in-house. It has more than 60 today, according to tracking by TJI Research, like Core 10 for women’s leggings and sports bras, and Goodthreads for men’s khaki pants and button-down tops.

More clothing sales shifting online

Separate data from eMarketer shows Amazon is on track to grab nearly 30% of the market for apparel and accessories sold online in the U.S. this year, up from 22.7%, or about $18.38 billion in sales, in 2016.

But remember: U.S. e-commerce sales still represent less than 15% of total retail sales, according to eMarketer. The majority of purchases are still happening in bricks-and-mortar stores.

RBC Capital Markets’ retail team is predicting 40% of apparel sales in the U.S. will take place on the internet by 2023, up from closer to 30% today. Currently, RBC says e-commerce accounts for roughly 20% to 25% of clothing and accessories sales for most retailers. For specialty retailers it’s closer to 29%, for department stores it’s about 24%, and for off-price retailers it’s just 2%, according to the firm.

And in a survey of 1,000 consumers in the U.S. ages 18 to 34 released in June, RBC found more than 50% of respondents say they start their searches for clothing online on platforms carrying numerous brands, rather than directly from a single brand’s website. That could end up boding well for Amazon.

“We believe Amazon could have a material presence in fashion, over time,” RBC said in a recent note to clients. “That said, we believe that Amazon would need to respond to changing style trends at a faster pace, especially with its own private label inventory. … Also, Amazon could improve its browsing experience for fashion customers — try searching for ‘women black dress’ and you will get over 350 options.”

[“source=cnbc”]

India vs Pakistan: Kashmiri wedding guests ensure there is TV at ceremony so they don’t miss the match

TV at a Kashmiri wedding so that people can watch India vs Pakistan World Cup match Photo: Twitter/ Shuja Ul Haq

TV at a Kashmiri wedding so that people can watch India vs Pakistan World Cup match

With each and every person of India and Pakistan being glued to their TV screens and watching the ICC World Cup 2019 match between the two countries, the cricket mania has reached the next level.

Everyone from the two neighboring countries is by hook or by crook trying to watch the match. To tell you exactly at what level the cricket craze has reached, we will share a tweet with you.

India Today’s reporter and Twitter user, Shuja Ul Haq shared a very interesting tweet with us. His tweet was captioned, “Guests at a wedding ceremony in Srinagar ensure that a TV enters the tent even before the groom. #IndiaVsPakistan #CricketWorldCup.”

[“source=indiatoday”]

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Solving shoes, the carbon footprint that really is a footprint

Consumers worried about their carbon footprints might want to take a look at, well, their footprints. The footwear industry is already aware of the climate impacts linked to materials and production, and working on solutions.

Now new luxury brand AERA has hit the streets with a shoe collection designers say is carbon-negative. The AERA line is a concept developed by prominent fashion executive Tina Bhojwani, an industry veteran of Donna Karan and Dolce & Gabbana, along with footwear designer Jean-Michel Cazabat and entrepreneur Alvertos Revach. They teamed up to deliver what they’re calling “vegan shoes” while offsetting the carbon and water inputs of footwear.

“We are working to set a new normal, one in which style, design and quality are analogous with sustainability,” said CEO Bhojwani. “I’m thrilled to announce that we have reached our number one objective – to become carbon negative.”

The company says it’s doing that through investment in reforestation projects that offset the carbon footprint by 110 percent, and water restoration certificates purchased through the Bonneville Environmental Foundation to achieve the same level of offsets on consumption. “And we’re not stopping there,” Bhojwani said. “Our next objective is to find ways to offset other key impacts.”

The shoes are made in the Veneto region of Italy in partnership with two families that have operated shoe factories for years, with just 20 and six employees respectively; the AERA team says that’s a conscious decision to support artisanal craftsmanship and corporate stewardship. AERA is also committed to living wages across its supply chain and is sourcing 95 percent of its materials from Italy too. The shoes are sold to consumers online.

A life-cycle assessment and impact verification for all AERA products was completed by SCS Global Services (SCS) to evaluate  the environmental  impacts of the materials, manufacturing process, transport and ultimate end-of-life for the shoes. Keith Killpack, the technical director for SCS, says the work “sets an important precedent for this industry given our current global climate challenge.”

The value of offsets and credits in the climate change fight can be controversial, as illustrated by a recent Pro Publica report on carbon credits and deforestation, but the AERA launch is a well-heeled step in the right direction for an industry that is looking for solutions to its outsize footprint.

A 2018 report from Qantis International looked at the impacts of synthetic, leather and textile-based shoes produced globally – more than half are synthetic – and found that footwear accounts for between 16 and 32 percent of the fashion industry’s total pollution though in different ways. Leather requires more raw materials and processing, often with toxic chemicals; textile-based shoes use a lot of water, and synthetics a lot of plastic.

Far too often all of them end up in a landfill, which is a problem reuse and recycling advocates like ShoeAid in the UK are trying to change.

Some shoe companies are turning to new materials like eucalyptus tree pulp or recaptured ocean plastic. Adidas hopes to make all of its running shoes from recycled plastic, beginning with marine waste. The company is a co-sponsor with nonprofit Parley of the Run for the Oceans, which kicks off on World Oceans Day on June 8.

[“source=sustainability-times.”]

Luxury Apparels Market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 12.3% Research Report by Top Players, Gross Margin, Profit Margin, Revenue, Forecast 2023

Luxury Apparels

“Latest Market Overview for Luxury Apparels Market Research Report 2018-2023 with CAGR 12.3%

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Competitor Analysis: by product types, market share, applications, sales, and revenue.

  • Hermès International S.A -Versace-Kering SA-Prada S.P.A-Dolce and Gabbana-LVMH Moet Hennessy Louis Vuitton S.E-Burberry Group Inc.-Giorgio Armani S.P.A-Ralph Lauren Corporation-Ermenegildo Zegna-Hugo Boss A.G-Kiton

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Description of Luxury Apparels Market: Increasing communication between consumers and key players through social media platform and online retail stores is driving the sales of latest trendy luxury apparels. Rise in online transactions are supporting the market growth of luxury apparels from last few years. Consumers specific offers and attractive promotions & advertising through magazine and social media is influencing the sales of luxury apparels as nearly half of luxury apparel buying decisions are majorly inclined by what consumers see or hear from offline and online platforms.

The global luxury apparels market is expected to register a CAGR of 12.3% during the forecast period, 2018 to 2023.

Acceptance of Latest Fashion Trends by millennial to Drive the Luxury Apparels Market Growth

Luxury apparels are mostly considered as status symbols for individuals which is driving discretionary spending with high purchasing power of consumers. Increasing popularity of luxury apparels among millennial are driving the market growth as they are more likely to be driven by latest fashion trend than other consumers groups. Improvement in digital marketing and rise in use of digital media in developing economies for product marketing are playing key role to drive the luxury apparels market growth from last few years. For instance, popular fashion brands like Topshop, Burberry and Alexander McQueen showed their use of live streaming with the help of digital runways at the SS 2017 fashion month.

Online Channel Expected to Witness Rapid Growth

The luxury apparels market is led by e-commerce i.e. online retail stores segment as consumers are preferring the online platforms over store based retail stores. Online platforms provide more options to choose and it is convenient for consumers. Many key players in luxury apparels are focusing on marketing and selling products on both their own website and that of selected retail store or pure luxury e-retailer partners in particular countries. Marketing strategies such as involvement of celebrity for brand endorsement is helping key players to attract more consumers from different financial backgrounds. As offline retail stores have limited growth potential over online retail stores, it is likely to influence sales of luxury apparels in online retail stores in upcoming years.

North America to Dominate the Luxury Apparels Market Share

North America is likely to hold significant market share in luxury apparels industry followed by Europe region over the forecast period due to increased demand of luxury goods including luxury apparels in the region. The growing attraction of luxury lifestyle, high purchasing power, and the influence of celebrity endorsement is driving the market growth in North America. Asia-Pacific region is estimated to witness significant growth rate in upcoming years owing to improving distribution network across the region. However, value added taxes imposed on luxury apparels and footwear by governments and high dominance of key players is restraining the market growth in developing economies.

Key Developments in the Luxury Apparels Market

July 2018: Reliance Brands has acquired 12.5% of stake in luxury apparel firm Future101 Design for USD 1.385 million. Future101 is engaged in manufacturing, distribution and sale of luxury apparels in India.
Jun 2018: Luxury women’s apparel retailer Moda Operandi recently launched Moda Operandi Man, marking the first time the e-retailer has sold men’s apparel. Moda Operandi Man debuted with more than 50 luxury brands, including Prada, Maison Margiela, Givenchy, Ralph Lauren, Balmain and Burberry, among others.

Luxury Apparels Market Competitive Landscape

Luxury Apparels Market

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  • Major Growth Prospects:The report also focuses on some of the Key growth prediction, including new product launches, Mergers and Acquisitions, Research and Development, joint ventures, collaborations, agreements, partnerships, and growth of the key Manufacturers working effectively in the market, both in terms of regional and global scale depending on geography.
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Sustainable students: How easy is it to be more environmentally-friendly?

Helen and Will

Plastics challenge

The students were challenged to reduce their plastic use by 75%, which they found difficult.

“It’s hard when you’re on a student budget, getting anything not wrapped in plastic is so much more expensive,” Amy explained.

Plastics guru Lucy Siegle gave them a helping hand, swapping their countless shower bottles for sustainable versions of shampoo, toothpaste and soap bars.

She also gave them reusable items like coffee cups and cutlery and told them to change their shopping habits.

Image caption Amy Fitzgerald and Jay Maheswaran were tasked with reducing their use of plastics

But Amy said they found supermarkets a particular problem as “everything was wrapped in plastic”.

“And going to the butcher’s was more expensive than getting pre-packaged stuff,” she added.

At the start of the week, Ms Siegle weighed the plastic in the students’ home, which totalled 2.8lb (1.3kg) – a figure she described as “rather a lot”.

With her advice, the students reduced it to 1.5lb.

Image caption Ms Siegle was not pleased with the house’s reliance on clingfilm, and confiscated their roll

“I’m still really pleased with them,” she said. “Especially as when I saw all the bottles they [initially] had in their bathroom, I nearly gave up.”

Ms Siegle said she thought the group had adopted the mindset shift really quickly, experiencing outrage over everything being plastic.

She urged them to be more militant by unwrapping products at the supermarket checkout and leaving the plastic behind to make the point.

“We need to take a stand,” she said.

Fashion challenge

Marcus Rudd, one of the housemates, had hoped that his shopping habits – buying 10 to 15 T-shirts a year, combined with some designer pieces – were environmentally friendly.

Then he learned that it took 3,000 litres of water on average to make only one T-shirt.

The fashion industry – which makes 100 billion garments each year – is a major contributor to greenhouse gases, water pollution, air pollution and the overuse of water.

Image caption Marcus was won over by charity and vintage shops, picking out this striking jacket

It is exacerbated, MPs say, by so-called “fast fashion” – inexpensive clothing produced rapidly by mass-market retailers.

Sustainable stylist Alice Wilby taught the students to reuse, repair and recycle, encouraging them to swap fast fashion for second-hand.

She challenged Marcus and his housemate Goby Chan, who regularly buys clothes she does not wear, to make a new outfit from old clothes to model at London Fashion Week.

“We buy so much stuff and half of it sits unworn in the back of the wardrobe,” Ms Wilby said.

“Before we buy anything else it’s great to see what you’ve already got, and fall back in love with your things.”

Image caption Marcus and Goby modelled recycled clothes for a Mother of Pearl show at London Fashion Week

Goby enjoyed the challenge. “I was shocked by what you can do by reusing a garment and making it into something new which is actually really fashionable. I actually love it.”

  • The students modelling recycled clothes
  • Quiz: Are your clothes damaging the environment?
  • The students with a food waste problem

And Ms Wilby said they did well.

“Considering Marcus had never set foot in a second-hand shop before – and thought they were smelly places with clothes you would never want to buy – by the end of the week he was finding pieces he really loved. That was a really great victory.

“These two shop a lot, and over the past month [since the challenge] he has only bought one item.”

Energy challenge

The students took dramatic action to reduce their energy usage – and it worked.

They used much less heating – switching it off at night; wearing jumpers, coats and blankets; and generally keeping the house a little bit cooler.

It made a huge difference to their gas usage – cutting it by a whopping 48%.

They also lowered their electricity usage by 15%. This added up to a 44% carbon saving – around a tonne of carbon in all.

“It was a massive effort – it was freezing in our house,” said Marcus Golby.

Image caption The students were able to drastically cut their home’s energy bills

“[Before] we weren’t communicating when things were going on and going off, so you ended up with the heating on the majority of the time,” explained Amy.

“This month we’re having more of a balance of keeping warm and keeping the heating off when we’re out.”

Dr Rosie Robison, an energy expert from Anglia Ruskin University, said it raised wider questions on whether the focus should be on individuals using less energy or the “wider responsibilities for landlords or homeowners, housebuilders and government for thinking about how our homes can require less fossil fuel in the first place”.

Food challenge

A third of all food made for human consumption is wasted every year – costing the average UK family £700 each year, estimates suggest.

The students were challenged to cut their food waste by 50% and move to the planetary health diet – a plant-based diet with small amounts of meat and fish.

Image caption Helen and Will cooked vegetable bolognese for the house, as part of adopting the planetary health diet for a week

Dr Elliot Woolley, a senior lecturer in sustainable manufacturing at Loughborough University, encouraged them to store their food more carefully to stop it becoming spoiled, plan their meals and prepare the right amount of food for the people eating.

He said that they found the challenge hard, but had reduced their food waste from 8.1lb to 6.8lb, which he described as “a fairly small reduction”.

Image caption The contents of the students’ food waste bin, before the challenge

Dr Woolley added: “One of the things it shows is even when you’re aware of the problem and you’re trying to reduce waste, it’s so ingrained into how we waste and use food that actually we continue with these large amounts.”

Housemate Will Smith said their waste totals were boosted by food bought before the challenge which had started to go off, but admitted: “I don’t think we did too well.”

But he said it had changed his mindset and he would continue trying not to waste food in future.

The Sustainable Students series was produced and directed by Owen Kean and Tom Yeates, with research by Curtis Gallant and Simon O’Leary.

[“source-“bbc”]

ZION WILLIAMSON BLOWN OUT NIKE SHOE IS MISSING … The $250,000 Mystery!!!

No one seems to know the location of Zion Williamson‘s infamous blown-out Nike sneaker — not Zion, not Duke, not even Nike … and it’s a huge problem considering it’s worth around $250,000!!!

Of course, Zion exploded his left PG 2.5 PE sneaker during the Feb. 20 game against North Carolina — injuring his knee in the process. Thankfully, he’s better now.

But, what happened next? Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski has said Nike reps came out to Durham and inspected the shoe in hopes of identifying the problem. But, it’s unclear who has the shoe now.

So, when we spotted Zion and his Duke teammates in Washington, D.C. the other day, we asked the 18-year-old straight up … who’s got the shoe?

Zion smiled and told us, “Uh, ask coach about ’em.”

So, we did! We hit up the Duke athletic dept., and a rep told us they have no idea where the shoes ended up.

Next call was to Nike — maybe they have the shoe, right?

A Nike rep told us, “I don’t have any information [on the location of the shoe].”

WHY HAS THIS BECOME SUCH A MYSTERY?!!

Our next call was to Ken Goldin from Goldin Auctions — one of the leading sellers of sports memorabilia in the world. He just sold some of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar‘s prized mementos for almost $3 MILLION!

Ken told us the shoes are INSANELY collectible — and could fetch more than $250,000 on the open market!!

In fact, Ken believes the blown out shoe plus the matching intact sneaker are “the most famous pair of sneakers in the world, period. End of story.”

Which brings us back to the original question … WHERE ARE THE SHOES?!

[“source=tmz”]