Bride Shot At In Delhi, Returns From Hospital For Wedding Ceremony

Bride Shot At In Delhi, Returns From Hospital For Wedding Ceremony\

NEW DELHI: 

HIGHLIGHTS

  1. The bullet brushed past the bride’s legs and she received treatment
  2. Bride Pooja says she has no idea who shot at her
  3. Post treatment the bride completed the wedding rituals

A bride was about to climb the dais for her wedding ceremony when she was shot at in Delhi’s Shakarpur area on Thursday. She was immediately taken to the hospital and after her treatment, the couple got married in a quiet ceremony.

The bride, Pooja, says she has no idea who shot at her.

“A bullet brushed past her legs, so we went to the hospital. Police was later called,” the groom, Bharat, told news agency ANI.

The police are talking to the guests to try and identify the attacker.

In a similar incident in November last year, a groom was shot by two gunmen as he rode a chariot to his wedding in Delhi. The groom, bandaged up, returned to his bride-to-be just three hours after the surgery and performed his wedding rituals.

[“source=ndtv”]

From blue hair to garment bags: this week’s fashion trends

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

Lady Gaga
 Blunette Lady Gaga. Photograph: Getty Images

Going up

Blunettes From Lady Gaga to Kylie Jenner, blue hair is everywhere.

Resentment Harness your negativity for a better life, says Sophie Hannah, author of How To Hold A Grudge.

Quinotto That’s quinoa risotto, of course.

Cultural altars Visionary fashion designer Grace Wales Bonner’s debut exhibition features an “assemblage of shrines” by notable artists, just opened at the Serpentine Gallery.

Grace Wales Bonner.
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 Shrine on: Grace Wales Bonner. Photograph: Alamy

Garment bags The new bumbags, according to Vogue. See Gucci, Alexander Wang and, er, your local dry cleaner.

Pizza wheel eyeliner Forget fiddly pens; rollers promise to fulfil all cat-eyed ambitions.

Going down

Olivia Pope There’s a new fixer in town. See Trinity Sommer in Dogs Of Berlin. A black patent mac and matching suitcase are the new white trouser suit.

Rhinoplasty Non-invasive “tweakments” are becoming more popular as cosmetic surgery fans opt for “lunch-break” procedures.

Gap yah string bracelets Bangles are back, according to Chrissy Teigen’s stylist, who recommends a layered approach.

H20 Waterless beauty is set to take over the skincare market this year, as manufacturers step away from the tap.

Pastels Wear neon green to boost your mood, à la Kendall Jenner. Sorry, coral.

[“source=theguardian”]

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer – No, It’s Not Sabyasachi

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer - No, It's Not Sabyasachi

 

After Sabyasachi and The House Of Angadi, Deepika Padukone picked an outfit from the shelves of Anamika Khanna for one of her wedding functions. The designer shared an image of Deepika with her family on her Instagram page and used ‘#weddingfestivities’ in the caption (now edited out) but she did not give away the details of event. In the picture, Deepika Padukone, dressed in an organza outfit, smiled as she hugged her family (in a very Hum Saath-Saath Hain style). Deepika’s sister Anisha, dressed in a chikankari anarkali, looked pretty. Deepika Padukone married actor Ranveer Singh in Italy earlier this month in the presence of their families and close friends. The couple is gearing up for their first Mumbai reception scheduled for November 28.

Anamika Khanna is the third designer Deepika Padukone opted for her wedding festivities, first being her favoured designer Sabyasachi. Deepika also wore a pure zari kanjeevaram saree in gold for the reception, which was a gift by her mother Ujjala Padukone from The House of Angadi. Deepika’s orange and gold saree for the Konkani wedding was also from The House of Angadi.

[“source=ndtv”]

From YouTube Star To Obama Interviewer: Liza Koshy, 22, Is Creating A Digital Media Empire

She specializes in punnery, physical gags and parodies. One of her widely watched videos spoofs the makeup tutorials that have proliferated across YouTube. And she has several popular characters, like her male, mustachioed alter ego, Jet Packinski III. “He’s a very handsome man. I believe I’m better looking as a dude than a girl,” Koshy says.

In the last few years, the 22-year-old has become one of YouTube’s biggest stars, earned a spot on Forbes’ latest 30 Under 30 list—and made the leap to traditional media. “The worst advice I’ve ever received was ‘Don’t post on YouTube, it’s dying,’” says Koshy, who earned an estimated seven figures in 2017, thanks largely to her online output.

Read the complete 2019 Forbes 30 Under 30 package.

Like many other digital-native stars, the Houston-born Koshy got her start on (now-defunct) Vine. She began shooting six-second videos on her cellphone as a teen in 2013, just months after the app’s January launch. Her first clip featured her climbing on top of a car with friends. “It was just me, with my phone, in my car, dancing along, talking or making a really bad joke,” she recalls. “Which is why Vine died. Sorry about that.”

Her comedy—and her camera skills—developed, and soon she was using cutaway shots to create skits and sight gags, including tying her hair into flopping bunches and pretending to be a butterfly. They appealed to her young audience, which grew to 7 million followers on Vine alone. Soon she wanted to go beyond Vine’s short clips. “I eventually realized that I could talk for much longer than that.”

So she parlayed her popularity into a YouTube channel in July 2015, where she began posting weekly. She introduced herself as “Liza the little brown girl”—her mother is white, her father is Indian—and expanded her comedy and range of characters. In addition to Jet Packinski, there is Helga, a bespectacled, frazzled foreigner, and Carlos Q, an macho Hispanic man. Other popular series include “Driving with Liza” and “Grocery Shopping with Liza,” where she films herself on the go, interlaying errands with songs and silly faces. In a sign of her increasing stardom, she interviewed President Obama for a get-out-the-vote initiative in 2016. “You can’t legally show it on camera, but I actually voted on my absentee ballot [during the video],” she says.

Koshy’s mobile-first audience largely comprises members of Generation Z, people born between 1996 and 2010. According to Nielsen, 97% of Generation Z own a smartphone, and the cohort boasts a reported $44 billion in spending power. Hence Koshy’s appeal to advertisers, who have sponsored her content and hired her for ads, including a series for Beats by Dre headphones. The spots reportedly have four times the click-through rate—the percentage of people visiting the product online after seeing the ad—than other promotions starring celebrities like NFL quarterback Tom Brady.

Her business has expanded with her audience. In 2016, she branched out into a second YouTube channel of more one-off videos that don’t feature regular activities or characters. Popular uploads include reaction videos of her watching her own old, cringeworthy vines (19 million views) or of her reacting to teens watching her videos (17 million views); the subsidiary channel has an additional 7.3 million subscribers.

With an expanding YouTube presence, Koshy has caught the eye of traditional TV executives. In 2017, she became a host of MTV’s resurrected TRL, scored a role in Hulu’s drama Freakish and nabbed a part in Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween. This year, she was hired as the face of Nickelodeon’s Double Dare reboot.

“All of these different opportunities came from YouTube,” she explains. So Koshy is staying close to the source: In 2018 she created, produced and starred in her own YouTube Originals series, Liza on Demand, in which she works in the gig economy.

Next up: a Liza Koshy line of bags, out this fall. “You can’t play a high school student forever, so at some point I’m going to have to tear down that wall and tear off that wig and be me,” says Koshy.

[“source=forbes]

How Poppy Lissiman Went From It Sunglasses to Accessories Powerhouse

“I had no idea it would become as big as it is.” The Perth-born accessories supremo behind the Le Skinny sunglasses (perched atop the noses of every Kardashian) still has a few more surprises up her spangly sleeve.

Poppy Lissiman – of the namesake accessories label she founded in 2008 – is not one to walk a well-worn path. The Perth-raised, Sydney-based designer’s trend-bucking accessories, in outrageous shapes and loud colours, slingshot her to cult status at the tender age of 19. Putting her kaleidoscope of embellished bags, clutches, key chains, jewellery and iPhone covers aside, it was her kooky sunglasses, most notably the Le Skinny style, which set social media alight after debuting in May 2017 – (literally) reshaping the eyewear market overnight. She’s since amassed more than 160,000 Instagram followers.

“I had no idea it would become as big as it is”, says Lissiman in earnest. “We certainly had a stream of [clutch] orders coming from overseas prior to this in 2013 and 2014, which was fairly steady until the spike of Le Skinnys last year.”

The angular sunglasses perched atop the noses of every Kardashian, Hadid and high-flying influencer known to Instagram exude a futuristic “Matrix” attitude and come in mandarin, lilac and clear hues. Alongside fellow Australian label Le Specs (whose team she fondly describes as being “such lovely people”), Lissiman had the fortuitous timing of tapping into the ’90s-inflected shock-factor fashion zeitgeist.

Accessory design runs in her blood. Lissiman’s mum Suzi was an accessory buyer and taught her to sew at 10 years old. But while privy to the rag trade growing up, Lissiman had other ideas as a teenager. “The interest in fashion was always there. I remember having these expensive subscriptions to international magazines such as Collezione and saving up all summer for Louis Vuitton hair bobbles – but back then, all I really wanted was to be a doctor.” But when she didn’t get the marks to study medicine, a six-month graphic design course followed, trailed by a two-week fashion course at Curtin University in Perth. But it took a retail role managing a Zomp Shoes store for something to click. “It was the first time I met people like me, other fashion nerds. Put it this way, when Alexander McQueen died we all cried.”

Zomp Shoes also proved seminal in Lissiman’s love and understanding of retail and the customer experience. It was these lessons she later applied to founding Poppy Lissiman Addition (a boutique in Perth’s Claremont) where she stocked her own line of ball gowns beside international labels including Mara Hoffman, L’America and Opening Ceremony. When she couldn’t find the right accessories to complement her zany, whimsical aesthetic, she decided to design her own.

“In the beginning I designed a lot for myself. It was very much a ‘I want this, so I’ll make this’ mentality,” she says. Ironically, it was this very instinct that almost derailed some serious sales.

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“I must admit my first sunglasses collection went terribly, even my friends didn’t buy them,” she says. “I almost didn’t do another one.” Lucky for us, she did. “I had the sample for Le Skinny on my kitchen counter and, having tried them on, they didn’t suit me at all. And so I decided against putting them into production. It wasn’t until a stylist friend, Thom Townsend, came over, saw them lying there, tried them on and told me I just had to make them.” With the help of social media, the Le Skinny heralded a new attitude in accessories and the rest is street-style history.

Flash forward to today and it’s not surprising the home of pop culture, the USA, is her biggest market. But her line of pop-inspired vegan-leather bags perform best on home turf (led by the best-selling South Beach Shell Shoulder Bag, which involves gold shell embellishments moulded from a scallop shell Lissiman found out the front of her parent’s house on South Beach in Perth’s Fremantle).

Lissiman hints she is keen to keep surprising her customers. “I think once you do one thing, you tend to want to swing the other way,” she says.

In full-throttle design mode as she works towards the looming production deadline of glitter wallets and nylon camera bags, which are slated to arrive before Christmas, the designer admits inspiration is as unconventional as her designs. “I get my best ideas when I’m having a massage, not that I have them all the time. Just the other day I was stuck in traffic and the tail lights of the car in front had an interesting shape. I literally just took a photo of their bumper as inspiration for a shape so, yeah, inspiration can come from absolutely anywhere.”

The designer also realised it was difficult to find eyewear made from premium materials at the right price point (her sunglasses retail between $125 and $145). “We wanted a price point that’s open to everyone. We felt we could still be a fashion-y brand without feeling the need to exclude people from the trend just to make an extra buck,” she says.

When asked how she handled the recent upshot in demand, Lissiman credits her “tight ship” team, which includes her parents Suzi and Skip Lissiman and marketing manager, Candy Wood. Lissiman also notes while everyone has their individual roles, the label is run very much like a start-up with many hats being swapped one day to the next. In addition to designing, Lissiman also oversees the label’s social-media accounts, graphic design and some of the customer service, too. And it was only earlier this year the PR was outsourced for the first time.

Thanks to Lissiman’s intimate involvement and her distinctly electric aesthetic, what was once a start-up sunglasses label has brazenly cut through the noise to be embraced by the mainstream. Keeping pace with its international appeal, Lissiman’s sights are set on expanding the label’s global footprint by strengthening relationships with wholesalers including Net-a-Porter and Galeries Lafayette, Kith and Lissiman-approved boutiques dotted across Cannes, Nice and Paris.

Between toying with the idea to return to designing wearable ball gowns, costume jewellery in the works and a range of vegan wallets launching early next year, the future looks fittingly technicolour for Poppy Lissiman. Wherever the path may lead one thing you can expect from her is the unexpected. “Every time I design, I think, ‘Have I seen this yet?’”

[“source=ndtv”]