Take A Virtual Tour: Former Honolulu Home Of Fashion Designer Geoffrey Beene For Sale At $14M

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The home’s three expansive stories hug the lower slopes of Diamond Head crater as they meet the water’s edge.

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Tucked away on the front slopes of the Diamond Head landmark in Honolulu is a Malibu-style house once owned by one of America’s most iconic fashion designers, Geoffrey Beene. The luxurious home at 3311 Beach Road is on the market with a $14 million asking price.

You might have to pinch yourself to be sure the stunning surroundings aren’t a dream as you view the beachfront home’s three stories hugging the lower slopes of Diamond Head crater as they meet the water’s edge. Stepping foot inside the custom kiln-formed textured glass entry door will likely confirm your feelings that this impressive home is indeed a retreat from the outside world.

Built in 1988, the residence features four bedrooms and four and a half bathrooms in 4,878 square feet of living space. Beene bought the property in 1992, and it was gifted to the Honolulu Academy of Arts in 2003. The home was sold in 2005 to its current owner, who undertook a major renovation in 2014, the result of which is a serene, Zen-like haven.

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The handmade textured glass entry door was designed by a local artisan.

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Famed American fashion designer Geoffrey Beene owned the residence from 1992 until 2003.

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The house is built of glass, concrete and steel. Walls of glass maximize the breathtaking sunrise and unparalleled Pacific Ocean views that one can experience in almost every room. The south-facing beachfront home’s unique position captures views of the Diamond Head Lighthouse on the side of a cliff.

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The home’s position provides views of the Diamond Head Lighthouse on the side of a cliff.

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Julianna Garris and Patricia Choi of the Choi Group with Hawaii Life are co-listing agents for the property.

“The moment you walk in the house you see an expansive view of the ocean, and it’s just gorgeous,” said Garris.

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Spacious living/dining room combo

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Eat-in island, custom cabinetry and Thermador appliances lend a sleek backdrop in the kitchen.

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The luxurious master bathroom includes floating vanities and walls covered in glass tiles.

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The residence features smart home technology, a sound system, oceanside spa, central air-conditioning and a photovoltaic system to transform Hawaii’s abundant days of sunshine into energy.

“There are 16 outside cameras, and you can remotely control the house from anywhere in the world,” Garris said.

An elevator and stairs provide access to all three levels of the home where one can admire imported limestone that was used extensively indoors and out. The bathroom walls are finished in an iridescent glass tile that’s a blend of sea salt and beige hues. Subdued shades of sea salt green paint on the bedroom walls provide a restful ambience.

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The master suite is a peaceful retreat.

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Ground-floor guest bedroom

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Oceanside Jacuzzi

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The oversized garage can be accessed from Beach Road, its entrance tucked seamlessly into the home’s privacy wall.

“The wall creates a buffer between you and any public viewing,” said Garris. “When someone drives past, you can’t see into the house.”

A Jacuzzi and small, well-manicured yard are on the oceanside ground level.

The home is just steps from the white sandy beach and a few dozen paddle strokes away from some of Oahu’s most popular surf breaks. Honolulu’s business district and public and private schools are nearby.

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Upper landing of the three-story home

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The popular hilly five-mile loop around the base of Diamond Head takes you through some of Oahu’s most exclusive neighborhoods. Or you could hike to the peak of the Diamond Head Summit Trail from the entrance to Diamond Head State Park and Recreation Area, just five minutes away.

Fine dining, boutique and luxury retail shopping, nightlife and every possible convenience are available in Waikiki, less than two miles from the home’s front door and an easy stroll along the water’s edge of Kapiolani Park.

“Diamond Head is a coveted area,” said Garris. “Not many people could afford to buy in this area. And then to be on a beach with a beautiful sandy coastline, that’s pretty darn rare. It’s an opportunity for someone who wants the best of the best on this island.”

[“source=forbes”]

How This Former Fashion Exec Changed Her Career With A Baby In Tow

Miles and Milan founder, Shennel FullerMiles and Milan

For this former retail executive, becoming an entrepreneur was the realization of a life-long dream. But it wasn’t until the birth of her first son that Shennel Fuller decided to create her own children’s clothing line, Miles and Milan.

And according to TendLab CEO and Co-founder, Amy Henderson, there is no better time to make this decision:

…any parent who leaves their child to go to work—whether it’s a choice or financial necessity—must grapple with the distance it creates. There are times when we want to be with them, and we can’t be. And this forces us to question what we are doing, and why we are doing it. Answering this question forges us, like steel in molten fire, into stronger, more motivated versions of our former selves.

Like other successful entrepreneurs who leave the corporate world beyond, Fuller followed the fire in her belly and refused to take no for an answer. Her tenacity and fortitude were inherited; as she is the daughter of hard-working immigrant parents who instilled in her, an unparalleled work ethic.

With the support of her husband, parents and sister, this founder charted her own course to becoming an entrepreneur and hopes to inspire other women to do the same.

Fuller: My entrepreneurial journey started three years ago after my first son, Jackson was born. My background is corporate, and I’ve held a few executive positions. I was teetering and trying to figure out if I wanted to go back. I was always a very dedicated and hard worker. But now my hard work was focused on keeping this baby alive. I was trying to figure out how I could feel the most fulfilled. I wanted to be doing what I was most passionate about. I knew it was retail and fashion, so I wanted to continue being immersed in that world, while also having the flexibility of being with my son and not missing any milestones.

For a while, I did some consulting. I was helping a major corporation by revamping their whole retail strategy. I loved the freedom of consulting; the flexibility, being my boss, managing my schedule and being able to live in both worlds (motherhood and fashion). I would bring my son to my business meetings. My work was still getting done, so I kind of shifted the narrative. I felt like if I’m going to be giving you great ideas, and developing your strategy, I can also be rocking my son at the same time if he needs me.  Which made me think, not only could I be consulting more but I can take it a step further. My dream was always to have my clothing line, and that’s pretty much the reason why I got into buying and working for those corporate companies, to begin with.

[“source=forbes]

Former Facebook Manager Says The Company Has A ‘Black People Problem’

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Today, Mark S. Luckie, a former manager at Facebook, posted a memo about how Facebook treats its Black employees. In the memo, Luckie indicates that “Black people are finding that their attempts to create ‘safe spaces’ on Facebook…are being derailed by the platform itself.” Luckie explained claims of mistreatment in more detail throughout the memo mentioning that Black people’s content has been removed without notice. Luckie also mentioned that underrepresented groups have been excluded on both Instagram and Facebook, with less visibility and access given to them. He went on to also explain that increasing diversity does not solve the inclusion issue; diversity without inclusion is ineffective. Luckie also explained how microaggressions have created hostile work environments to many different Facebook employees he’s spoken to. When employees complain and report these issues to Human Resources (HR), they are made to feel as if the incidents are “a figment of [their] imagination.” Some Black employees may be hesitant to express their feelings about the mistreatment for fear of losing their job or retaliation. Despite the efforts Facebook has made to be more inclusive (employee resource groups, their diversity team), the company is unsuccessful at truly fostering a culture of inclusion for its Black employees.

How can the tech industry foster not only a more diverse environment but also a more inclusive environment that is more welcoming to Black people and other underrepresented groups?

    1. The first step in fostering a diverse and inclusive environment is conducting an audit of the current diversity climate within the organization. Enlist the opinions of employees, as well as customers, on how to improve different aspects of the organization. Luckie suggested implementing focus groups with people of color, which is an excellent suggestion. Focus groups can play a fundamental role in helping organizations assess how to make their products and services better. If multiple users are complaining about a specific issue (i.e. Black Facebook and Instagram user posts being removed and accounts being suspended), this should be addressed and dealt with.
    2. Luckie mentioned one solution is cultural competency training. An addition to this suggestion is that the training should be done on a frequent and ongoing basis. Research indicates that diversity training is successful when it is delivered over a significant period of time. Training can also impact the frequency of microaggressions, making the workplace a more inviting environment. Leaders should be required to participate in training, as well as each staff member in the organization.
    1. Diversity goes beyond just the numbers. The attraction of diverse talent is just one piece of the puzzle. The often more challenging aspect of diversity is figuring out how to foster a culture of inclusion for all. Are you allowing diverse talent to have a seat at the table? Assess team-building activities in the organization. Is everyone invited to the after-work events and parties? What is being done in the organization to foster interpersonal connections? Evaluate what is currently being done and figure out what could be done better.
    2. HR departments are often the first line of defense when employees feel that they’ve been mistreated. The HR department should have a clear plan for addressing these issues. Complaints made should be investigated and examined frequently. If there is a consistent or recurring claim being made, it should be dealt with. Luckie suggested creating “internal systems for employees to anonymously report microaggressions.” This can be an effective strategy. Employees may want to complain or report an incident but fear it will impact their job and status at the organization. Companies may benefit from integrating an anonymous system in which employees can report issues that occur, without fears of repercussions.

[“source=forbes]