Alia Bhatt’s designer anarkali is just perfect for a mehandi celebration

Alia-Bhatt

Alia Bhatt has been very busy promoting Kalank lately, and today seems to have been no different for the actor. This afternoon, the star was spotted spreading word about her upcoming film once again on the sets of a reality show. Her pick for the outing was a pretty peach anarkali by Anita Dongre. Bhatt accessorised her look with a pair of silver earrings by Minerali and gold heels. Accompanying her at Kalank‘s most recent event were co-stars Varun Dhawan and Sonakshi Sinha. While the former complemented Bhatt’s pastel look with a soft pink kurta, the latter played with prints in Anamika Khanna separates. If you’ve been on the lookout for a peach wedding-ready look, however, Bhatt’s anarkali is the one you need to check out.

Alia Bhatt’s designer anarkali is for every woman who loves soothing hues

If you’ve been keeping up with Alia Bhatt’s recent sartorial choices, you would know that keeping her on-screen character’s look in mind, the star has been dressing largely in Indian ethnic wear for Kalank‘s promotional rounds. While the first look of Kalank had Bhatt dressing in a white Manish Malhotraanarkali, the launch of its song ‘First Class’ saw her meeting fans in a striking black Anita Dongre kurta. Her latest anarkali featured delicate embroidery and a lightweight tulle dupatta that made it perfect for a day event like a mehandi party, or even a poolside engagement celebration. Bhatt went the elegant route with her beauty look and opted for lightly kohled eyes, glossy lips, dewy makeup and freshly blowdried hair. A pastel ensemble like Alia Bhatt’s is a refreshing addition to your festive wardrobe if you’re bored of bold jewel tones. Get something similar for yourself today!

Image: Viral Bhayani

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NYFW: A Celebration of Oscar-Nominated Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter

The one-night-only installation showcased the cultural relevancy of Carter’s work today in themed vignettes such as “Women In Protest” and “The Hero.”

Ruth E. Carter looked around the fifth-floor space at New York’s Spring Studios, where roughly 30 costumes from her 30-year career were arranged in a half-dozen vignettes, and she couldn’t help but appreciate the full-circle moment. “I beat these streets for years, looking for costumes, creating costumes for Spike Lee, riding the subways of New York as a stylist, as a costume designer,” Carter said. “I did everything in this city, so coming back here with my clothes and my exhibition is a really proud moment for me and is all about coming home to the city that I love.”

Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for IMG

Carter is currently enjoying high-wattage attention largely due to her Oscar-nominated designs for 2018’s Black Panther – a “Heroes and Sheroes” exhibition featuring her work has been touring the U.S. since that film premiered last February (pieces are included in the 27th annual “Art of Motion Picture Costume Design” exhibition at  L.A.’s Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising through April 12). Wednesday night’s event, which doubled as a kick-off party for fall 2019 New York Fashion Week, highlighted the marriage of film and fashion woven through the thread of Carter’s designs.

“Every time you go to a fashion photo shoot, you’ll find inspiration images on the wall, and many times they come from film,” noted Ivan Bart, president of IMG Fashion. “When I first met with Ruth [in November], I told her, ‘You have to understand, you’re inspiring a whole new generation of fashion designers.’ I wanted to create an event that showcased that combination of inspiration and aspiration, and how that extends to interpretation.”

Anna Webber/Getty Images for IMG
CEO and founder of Harlem’s Fashion Row Brandice N. Daniel, honoree Ruth E. Carter and president of IMG Models and IMG Fashion Properties Ivan Bart.

Bart partnered with Harlem’s Fashion Row, the organization that works to increase visibility for multicultural designers, and enlisted British stylist Ibrahim Kamara to create looks head-to-toe inspired by the range of Carter’s designs, dating to her first film, the 1988 blaxploitation parody I’m Gonna Git You Sucka. The result was a group of six vignettes populated by live models and mannequins: Carter’s yellow suit from that film, complete with goldfish shoes, was placed alongside a model wearing Kamara’s modern interpretation of the look in a vignette titled “Fly Guys.”

Mike Coppola/Getty Images for NYFW: The Shows

Other themes ranged from “Women in Protest,” which included Carter’s designs for 1992’s Malcolm X, 1989’s Do The Right Thing and 2015’s Chi-Raq, to “The Bad Boys,” which featured pieces like the Giorgio Armani laser-cut leather coat worn by Samuel L. Jackson as part of Carter’s work in 2000’s Shaft.

A vignette titled “The Hero”  extended beyond a look worn by Chadwick Boseman in Black Pantherto include Carter’s designs for Denzel Washington in Malcolm X and David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King in 2014’s Selma. Kamara took those ideas and created a modern-day LGBTQ freedom fighter in a silk white suit with a printed overcoat.

Mike Coppola/Getty Images for NYFW: The Shows

“Ibrahim is so humble, and he’s a genius,” Carter said. “There were no egos here; we appreciated each other. I know I pushed him and inspired him, and he inspired me with his quiet confidence.”

Of course, that begs the question: Who or what inspires Ruth Carter? You only have to look at her work to know the answer. “Some people think I got into costume design because I love Dior and Chanel and Tom Ford, but it really was these stories of African-American culture, this story of our journey,” she said. “When I started, I didn’t see very much of us, and I really in my heart wanted to tell my stories. Tonight is the result of 30 years of hard, hard work.”

 

 

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