The Black Design Collective Pays Tribute to Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter

The Black Design Collective Pays Tribute to Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter

With more than 20 years in the fashion industry, Angela Dean, Kevan Hall, and TJ Walkercontinue to see a lack of support for black designers, which in turn hinders careers and erases the history of those who have made contributions. Dean has designed custom looks for celebrities such as Regina King, Oprah Winfrey, and Madonna; Hall is the former creative director of Halston (the house that designed looks for Jacqueline Kennedy and Lauren Hutton); and Walkercofounded the iconic streetwear brand Cross Colours. So this year, they decided to take a step to fix the situation and launched the Black Design Collective. Their mission is to lift up and amplify the work of black fashion designers and black costume designers, by providing a platform for established designers to develop their brands globally and creating a mentorship program for aspiring designers.

Living up to its core initiative, the Black Fashion Collective on Saturday is honoring one of the greats in costume design, Ruth E. Carter, in the group’s first ceremony, in partnership with AT&T. The Academy Award–winning costume designer has been the wardrobe mastermind behind some of the most iconic black films to date: Do the Right ThingMalcolm XSelma, and, most recently, Black Panther, for which Carter took home an Oscar.

The event, which will take place at the Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising, will also be the launch of the Black Design Collective’s scholarship fund, which was created to help young designers in their pursuit of higher education in the fields of fashion and costume design. One merit scholarship will be given to a costume-design student based on their GPA, portfolio, and the changes they would like to see in the world of fashion.

Teen Vogue spoke with the founders of the Black Design Collective about their mission and the importance of fostering a supportive community for aspiring black designers.

TV: Why start the Black Design Collective?
Kevan Hall: When we think about the great designers that so many people don’t know about, like Patrick Kelly and Willi Smith, these people who pushed the door open and broke the glass ceiling—how many people actually know about these designers today? We wanted to have a voice, first, to speak about our accomplishments and our successes, and then, as a second initiative, how can we empower the next generation of designers? So that’s how the Black Design Collective was founded.

Angela Dean: And bringing relevance in history, from a global platform and really wanting to reach out beyond America so that people can really understand how much creative black fashion design exists in the world.

__TV: In what ways do you plan to raise awareness around issues that black fashion designers face?__

TJ Walker: With the workshops and mentorship programs that we want to initiate within the organization. We want to educate the students and bring them on to mentor them, but not just mentor them while they’re with the organization, to also track their success and actually guide them through the industry and help them navigate some of the things you would typically face in the industry on your own.

TV: What does Ruth E. Carter’s Oscar win mean for the black design community?

KH: It’s an incredible accomplishment, when we think of Ruth’s body of work—over 40 films and television projects to her credit and 30-plus years in the industry. You know it meant a lot to her and it meant a lot to our community to be able to see a black woman who stayed focused in a career and worked her way to that stage.

AD: She gave inspiration to those that come through to know that all is possible. She’s worked tremendously hard up to this point with very little recognition. We actually came up with the idea to honor her a year or so prior to the win, and have been supporting her long before she won the Oscar.

TV: How have you seen the industry change for black professionals?KH: Things are starting to get better for us because we are now making people aware of the issues. As we begin to speak about it more, as we begin to amplify the talent of black designers and our contributions over the decades, we all will begin to see more of a change. We’re just starting to see a trickle now, and that’s why the Black Design Collective exists, to amplify our talent, to lift and promote our craft and our skills, and to empower our young people.

TJW: Social media has also given us a platform, making it an even playing field for us to actually identify who we are, what we are, and what we’re doing in current times, and, actually, from the past as well.

This interview has been edited and condensed.

[“source=teenvogue”]

Rihanna set to become LVMH’s first black female designer – reports

Rihanna.

Rihanna at the the Met Museum’s Costume Institute benefit on 7 May 2018. Photograph: Carl Timpone/BFA/REX/Shutterstock

Rihanna is reportedly about to make history as the first black female to head up a fashion brand at the world’s largest luxury conglomerate, LVMH.

It would be the first new fashion house the group, which owns Christian Dior, Louis Vuitton and Givenchy, has launched since Christian Lacroix in 1987.

The new brand is expected to take the singer’s last name, Fenty, which she uses for her make-up and lingerie businesses. Speculation was fuelled this week when she stepped out in an oversized pair of sunglasses with the brand’s logo visible on the side.

Rihanna has filed a lawsuit against her father, Ronald Fenty, in a dispute over the use of the Fenty name by their respective companies. The lawsuit stated he “egregiously and fraudulently misrepresented to third parties and the public that their company … is affiliated with Rihanna”. Rihanna is asking for a legal injunction on the use of the Fenty name, as well as unspecified damages.

The deal would be a shrewd business move for LVMH, which has been courting the singer for some time. While she worked on a capsule collection of sunglasses in 2015 for LVMH’s Dior, she collaborated with Puma in 2016, generating $1bn in sales for the sportswear brand.

In 2017, LVMH lured her back to collaborate on her make-up line, Fenty Beauty. The range, which was praised for encompassing a wide range of skin tones, reportedly made $100m in sales within 40 days and was named as one of Time Magazine’s 25 best inventions that year.

Her lingerie line, Savage x Fenty, which launched in May 2017, has enjoyed huge success and acclaim for its inclusivity. Pitched as the antidote to existing underwear brands such as Victoria’s Secret, which has been accused of being culturally out of touch and objectifying women, the TechStyle Fashion Group-backed brand includes sizes ranging from from XS to 3XL and features plus-size models in its campaigns.

“I accept all of the bodies,” Rihanna told US Vogue last year. “I’m not built like a Victoria’s Secret girl, and I still feel very beautiful and confident in my lingerie.” TechStyle’s CEO told the trade publication WWD at the time that he chose Rihanna because she was “the right partner to bring instant credibility and exposure” to the brand.

Rihanna.
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 Rihanna at the Louis Vuitton show during the Paris men’s fashion week on 21 Jun 2018. Photograph: Laurent VU/SIPA/REX/Shutterstock

While the details of her new fashion brand remain under wraps, its concept is a reflection of the state of play in the fashion industry. Established and heritage brands are increasingly teaming up with high-profile celebrities such as Rihanna – who has 67 million Instagram followers – to work on collaborations and endorse products thanks to the influence they hold over the lucrative “Generation Z” consumer market.

The Kardashian family are another prolific example of this and have been tapped by several fashion houses, including Calvin Klein, all eager to attract their combined 508.7 million social media followers.

Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty.
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 Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty make-up line was praised for incorporating a wide range of skin tones. Photograph: Caroline McCredie/Getty Images for Fenty Beauty by Rihanna

It would also signal a further evolution in what it takes to head up a fashion house in the 21st century. Like Virgil Abloh, who was appointed as the artistic director of LVMH’s flagship brand Louis Vuitton last year, Rihanna has no formal fashion training. Abloh’s first Vuitton collection is selling 30% faster than the much-hyped collaboration with Supreme from 2017.

Abloh’s mentor Kanye West is another example of a successful musician-to-designer transition. Aside from his claims that his clothing brand Yeezy “will become the biggest apparel company in human history”, it was reported last year that his brand had received a $1.5bn valuation.

Virgil Abloh.
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 Like Virgil Abloh, who was appointed as the artistic director of LVMH’s flagship brand Louis Vuitton last year, Rihanna has no formal fashion training. Photograph: Swan Gallet/WWD/REX/Shutterstock

The launch of Rihanna’s brand could go some way to answering calls for more diversity among fashion’s leaders. Last year, she became the first black woman to be on the September cover, traditionally the largest and most important edition of the magazine, of British Vogue.

“A fearless music-industry icon and businesswoman, when it comes to that potent mix of fashion and celebrity, nobody does it quite like her,” said the editor-in-chief, Edward Enninful, of Rihanna.

[“source=theguardian”]

Former Facebook Manager Says The Company Has A ‘Black People Problem’

Bloomberg Royalty Free© 2018 Bloomberg Finance LP

Today, Mark S. Luckie, a former manager at Facebook, posted a memo about how Facebook treats its Black employees. In the memo, Luckie indicates that “Black people are finding that their attempts to create ‘safe spaces’ on Facebook…are being derailed by the platform itself.” Luckie explained claims of mistreatment in more detail throughout the memo mentioning that Black people’s content has been removed without notice. Luckie also mentioned that underrepresented groups have been excluded on both Instagram and Facebook, with less visibility and access given to them. He went on to also explain that increasing diversity does not solve the inclusion issue; diversity without inclusion is ineffective. Luckie also explained how microaggressions have created hostile work environments to many different Facebook employees he’s spoken to. When employees complain and report these issues to Human Resources (HR), they are made to feel as if the incidents are “a figment of [their] imagination.” Some Black employees may be hesitant to express their feelings about the mistreatment for fear of losing their job or retaliation. Despite the efforts Facebook has made to be more inclusive (employee resource groups, their diversity team), the company is unsuccessful at truly fostering a culture of inclusion for its Black employees.

How can the tech industry foster not only a more diverse environment but also a more inclusive environment that is more welcoming to Black people and other underrepresented groups?

    1. The first step in fostering a diverse and inclusive environment is conducting an audit of the current diversity climate within the organization. Enlist the opinions of employees, as well as customers, on how to improve different aspects of the organization. Luckie suggested implementing focus groups with people of color, which is an excellent suggestion. Focus groups can play a fundamental role in helping organizations assess how to make their products and services better. If multiple users are complaining about a specific issue (i.e. Black Facebook and Instagram user posts being removed and accounts being suspended), this should be addressed and dealt with.
    2. Luckie mentioned one solution is cultural competency training. An addition to this suggestion is that the training should be done on a frequent and ongoing basis. Research indicates that diversity training is successful when it is delivered over a significant period of time. Training can also impact the frequency of microaggressions, making the workplace a more inviting environment. Leaders should be required to participate in training, as well as each staff member in the organization.
    1. Diversity goes beyond just the numbers. The attraction of diverse talent is just one piece of the puzzle. The often more challenging aspect of diversity is figuring out how to foster a culture of inclusion for all. Are you allowing diverse talent to have a seat at the table? Assess team-building activities in the organization. Is everyone invited to the after-work events and parties? What is being done in the organization to foster interpersonal connections? Evaluate what is currently being done and figure out what could be done better.
    2. HR departments are often the first line of defense when employees feel that they’ve been mistreated. The HR department should have a clear plan for addressing these issues. Complaints made should be investigated and examined frequently. If there is a consistent or recurring claim being made, it should be dealt with. Luckie suggested creating “internal systems for employees to anonymously report microaggressions.” This can be an effective strategy. Employees may want to complain or report an incident but fear it will impact their job and status at the organization. Companies may benefit from integrating an anonymous system in which employees can report issues that occur, without fears of repercussions.

[“source=forbes]

2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More

 

2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More

  • The 2018 Ertiga can be had with blacked out alloy wheels or stylised wheel covers
  • Maruti is offering chrome finished exterior accents and PU seat covers for a more upmarket feel
  • Those who want a predefined package can choose either the ‘Ambitious’ or ‘Indulge’ package

Although the new Maruti Suzuki Ertiga gets a decent amount of features right from the base variants, it misses out on some feel-good features like artificial leather seat covers for the sake of competitive pricing. But fret not, here’s a list of official accessories that Maruti is offering with the second-gen Ertiga. These include styling packages which cover both the exterior and interior of the MPV along with a variety of car cleaning products that can be bought separately.

2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More

  • If you want your new Ertiga to look sporty, you can choose from front and rear lip spoilers, a roof mounted spoiler (Rs 4499) and side skirts (Rs 3199 to Rs 3799).
  • Other exterior updates include blacked out alloy wheels with pitchfork-shaped spokes for Rs 22,000 and wheel covers for Rs 1,600. These, paired with the above-mentioned exterior kit, can make the Ertiga look sporty. Although a blacked out grille would have complemented this body kit well, only the base variant of the Ertiga gets it. Prices of all the body kits are pegged at Rs 25,990.
  • If the above accessories don’t suit your taste, you can opt from a list of chrome finished accessories like garnishes for the headlamp, fog lamp, tail lamp, rear bumper and the number plate. These bits and pieces are priced in the range of Rs 750 to Rs 3,799, which is quite acceptable for the added bling they offer.

2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More 2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More

Interiors

  • None of the variants of the 2018 Ertiga are available with leather upholstery. However, you can have the seat covers finished in PU leather, Premium PU leather or PU and fabric upholstery. These range from Rs 8,870 to Rs 10,490, which is a good deal when you consider the fact that it covers all three rows.

2018 Maruti Ertiga Official Accessories Includes Black Alloy Wheels, Touchscreen Infotainment System & More

[“source=ndtv”]

Great cheap accessories for all the stuff you bought on Black Friday

Quick note: If you live in SE Michigan, come check me out tonight at the Livonia Public Library at 7 p.m. Learn my favorite money-saving secrets and enjoy a good chance at winning some raffle prizes!

I’ll admit it — I’m glad Black Friday and Cyber Monday are in the rear view. Because although there were some colossal deals this year, it’s exhausting to sort, track and share them all!

That said, you cannot imagine the Herculean efforts of countless CNET writers and editors, who’ve been doing all that sorting, tracking and sharing for weeks. To say this was a team effort is an understatement. I was a tiny cog in the much greater Black Friday machine, and my fellow deal finders deserve a ton of credit. (And a beer — next round’s on me!)

Before we dive into today’s deals, which are all about improving the products you might have scored during the past few days, let me pause to talk about charity. Today is Giving Tuesday, and even if your wallet is empty, you can support worthy causes without spending a dime. Please consider helping those less fortunate. It’s much quicker and easier than you think.

On to business. Did you score an awesome new toy during the sale madness of the past couple weeks? Let’s talk about some accessories you might want to add — and some surprisingly cheap ones at that.

You bought a new phone

speck-stay-clear-iphone-xr
Don’t overpay for a phone case; anything over $10-15 is probably too much.

Sarah Tew/CNET

It doesn’t matter if you spent $200 or $1,200 — the first order of business is a case. Because, let’s face it, gravity happens. Here’s what you shouldn’t do: Buy an expensive case from Apple, AT&T, Verizon or some other retailer. You may have bought your phone there, but cases are best sourced elsewhere.

My advice: Hit up Amazon and Ebay. Just search for cases for your phone model and you’ll find a dizzying array of choices. Hard cases, soft cases, clear ones, colored ones and so on. Even better, you’ll find lots of them priced around $10-15 — much better than the $30-50 you’re likely to pay in store.

Read more: iPhone XR cases: 4 cheap alternatives to Apple’s $40 one

Of course, putting your phone in a case doesn’t guarantee 100-percent protection against pavement encounters. The best protection is not dropping your phone in the first place, which is why I continue to champion Phone Straps (formerly Ninja Loops).

See it at Phone Loops

A mere $5 buys you a stylish strap that attaches to just about any phone case. Once you get accustomed to sliding your fingers underneath it, you’ll find it much easier to grip your phone — and you’ll be much less likely to drop it.

This remains one of my all-time favorite products. It makes a great gift, too, which is why you should buy at least three (which bags you free shipping).

You bought a Nintendo Switch

Switch deals were everywhere this year — and often quite fleeting. Now that you have the console, though, you might want to consider a couple accessories — starting with a mobile charger.

The Switch relies on a USB-C input, though you don’t necessarily need a power bank that has a USB-C output. Those tend to cost a bit more, though they have the advantage of recharging your console more quickly than a standard 5V USB-A port.

omars-power-bank
This Switch-friendly mobile chargers is a very good deal at $23.

Omars

Here’s a good option: The Omars 10,000-mAh Power Bank for $22.99 (minus a 5-percent coupon you can click to add). It features USB-A and USB-C outputs, the latter featuring 18-watt Power Delivery (PD) for fast Switch charging.

[“source=ndtv”]