Kate Bosworth is flawless in floral frock as she celebrates designer Jason Wu’s spring collection

She’s a famous fashionista.

And on Thursday, Kate Bosworth led the stylish stars that showed up for a luncheon celebrating designer Jason Wu.

The Beverly Hills event was hosted by Saks 5th Avenue and also included Alyssa Milano, Camilla Belle and Linda Cardellini.

Muse: She's a famous fashionista. And on Thursday, Kate Bosworth led the stylish stars that showed up for a luncheon in Beverly Hills celebrating designer Jason Wu

Muse: She’s a famous fashionista. And on Thursday, Kate Bosworth led the stylish stars that showed up for a luncheon in Beverly Hills celebrating designer Jason Wu

Bosworth, 36, looked lovely in a white frock with blue and orange floral motifs.

She went bare-legged in black pumps and wore her golden locks loose with a center parting.

The actress was made up with black mascara, a touch of rosy blush and red lip color.

Stylish: Bosworth, 36, looked lovely in a white frock with blue and orange floral motifs. She went bare-legged in black pumps and wore her golden locks loose with a center parting

Stylish: Bosworth, 36, looked lovely in a white frock with blue and orange floral motifs. She went bare-legged in black pumps and wore her golden locks loose with a center parting

The event celebrated Jason Wu's spring collection - the designer is pictured with Bosworth
The event was hosted by Saks Fifth Avenue - company president Marc Metrick posed with Bosworth

VIPs: The event celebrated Wu’s spring collection – he’s pictured left with Bosworth – and was hosted by Saks Fifth Avenue – company president Marc Metrick posed with Bosworth right

Gaggle of beauties: On hand, too, for the luncheon were actresses - from l-r - Alyssa Milano, Camilla Belle and Linda Cardellini who also wore dresses from Wu's collection

Gaggle of beauties: On hand, too, for the luncheon were actresses – from l-r – Alyssa Milano, Camilla Belle and Linda Cardellini who also wore dresses from Wu’s collection

Like Bosworth, the other celebrities in attendance also wore dresses from Wu’s spring collection.

Alyssa Milano, 46, opted for a floaty monochrome number with semi-sheer sleeves and belted at the waist.

Camilla Belle, 32, chose a sleeveless colorful frock with vertical black detailing and black waistband.

Meanwhile, Linda Cardellini, 43, was pretty in a sleeveless yellow slip with a patterned overlay.

Eye-catching: Belle, 32, chose a sleeveless colorful frock with vertical black detailing and black waistband and wore it with silvery heels 

Eye-catching: Belle, 32, chose a sleeveless colorful frock with vertical black detailing and black waistband and wore it with silvery heels

Man of the moment: Belle also posed for pictures with the designer

Man of the moment: Belle also posed for pictures with the designer

Pretty: Linda Cardellini, 43, was pretty in a sleeveless yellow slip with a patterned overlay and added shiny silver sandal heels

Pretty: Linda Cardellini, 43, was pretty in a sleeveless yellow slip with a patterned overlay and added shiny silver sandal heels

Bosworth is gearing up for another TV series hot after starring in National Geographic’s 2017 mini series The Long Road Home.

She’s set to play the main leading role in a sci-fi series for Netflix called The I-Land.

According to IMDb, the seven-parter is about ten people’s struggle to survive on a mysterious island after waking up there with no memory of how they got there and who they are.

She’s also wrapped the big screen drama The Devil Has A Name directed by Edward James Olmos and co-starring Martin Sheen and Haley Joel Osment, due for release this year.

Catching up: Bosworth posed with Stacy Martin during the luncheon held at the exclusive Hotel Bel-Air

Catching up: Bosworth posed with Stacy Martin during the luncheon held at the exclusive Hotel Bel-Air

Poised: The actress was made up with black mascara, a touch of rosy blush and red lip color

Poised: The actress was made up with black mascara, a touch of rosy blush and red lip color

Good company: Wu was sat between Belle and Bosworth

Good company: Wu was sat between Belle and Bosworth

Pals: The designer made sure to spend some time with Cardellini too

Pals: The designer made sure to spend some time with Cardellini too

In the spotlight: Mary Martin, second from left, joined the others for a group photo

In the spotlight: Mary Martin, second from left, joined the others for a group photo

[“source=dailymail.co.uk”]

Oprah Winfrey’s Sabyasachi Connection, As Revealed By The Designer

Oprah Winfrey's Sabyasachi Connection, As Revealed By The Designer

On Monday, ace fashion designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee revealed that actress-talk show host Oprah Winfrey recently wore a custom-made black sari designed by him on the cover of Elle India’s December 2018 edition. Oprah has featured on the magazine’s 22nd anniversary cover. She complemented the sari with 29.5 carats Zambian emerald and diamond earrings from Sabyasachi’s heritage jewellery collection. A picture of the cover was shared by Sabyasachi on his Instagram timeline, who also revealed details about his meeting with Oprah Winfrey on her first trip to India. She had visited India in 2012 and while attending a dinner hosted by the royal family in Jaipur, Oprah Winfrey had also worn a sari designed by Sabyasachi.

“Nothing prepares you for meeting Oprah in real life. On her maiden trip to India, Oprah attended a dinner hosted by the royal family in Jaipur and I had the good fortune to dress her in a saree for it. We spent some time discussing India and spirituality, as well as Indian art and handicrafts,” Sabyasachi wrote.

On her way to the Jaipur Literary Festival, Oprah Winfrey had visited Sabyasachi’s new store in Mumbai too. “The opening of my store in Kala Ghoda came up in conversation and Oprah promised to swing by in the morning if she got time off from her busy schedule. I thought she was being polite. Oprah isn’t just one of the world’s most influential personalities. She’s larger than life, but also as real as it gets!” Sabyasachi added.

[“source=ndtv”]

Could social media emerge as a new critical infrastructure sector?

Social media has become an important conduit for official and emergency government communications with the public. With such communications having the power to critically affect national security, social networks have become a hacker’s paradise and need to be taken more seriously.

US President Donald Trump’s official Twitter account is one example of how social media is now a popular channel for engaging with the public in realtime. At the more extreme end of the scale, recent events in Hawaii and Japan saw false missile alerts sent due to human error, causing populations to spiral into turmoil. These incidents highlight how social media accounts are becoming part of the critical infrastructure that governs our day-to-day lives.

It’s clear that communications, or mis-communications, of this kind have the potential to wreak havoc. But the question is: should the use of these social media accounts — like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and more — for official and emergency purposes, be regulated by legislation?

“Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.”

In Australia, telecommunications carriers are subject to the Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms (TSSR), while other critical infrastructure falls under the recently introduced Security of Critical Infrastructure Act (2018). This act is primarily focused on major infrastructure assets like power and water, that supply essential services to more than 100,000 people.

In both the TSSR and the act, scope is given for the relevant minister to direct a provider or intermediary “to do, or not do, a specified thing that is reasonably necessary to protect networks and facilities from national security risks.”

Under the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act, the relevant minister can also nominate additional industry centres for inclusion, provided the minister is satisfied there is a risk that the assets or services could have a prejudicial effect on national security.

Top of the priority list currently are airports and data centres. It’s possible the minister will declare social media communications as subject to the act, but, at this stage, it’s unlikely.

Top-grade cybersecurity practices essential

So, what should governments be doing when it comes to securing social media accounts used for timely or sensitive communications? Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.

Government personnel operating social media for official or emergency purposes should undertake a review of how their accounts are managed. Hardening communication platforms should include stepping up password management practices. This will help eliminate the chance of delays to the delivery of critical information or the exploitation of accounts for nefarious purposes, such as issuing false or misleading information.

“To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged.”

Hackers know the value and vulnerability of social media today, and are already hijacking official accounts. In 2017, a rogue Twitter employee shut down Donald Trump’s Twitter account for 11 minutes in an act of protest.

Disgruntled employees aren’t the only risk – hackers could use any one of several social engineering techniques, such as phishing, to gain access to passwords for social media. If they did so, they’d be able to issue false statements on a public social media account, potentially causing fear and panic.

Government personnel within specific departments or offices commonly share access to social media accounts. This means that potentially dozens of people throughout an agency have access, admin or editing rights on these platforms. Not least, passwords for these accounts are usually shared between team members, rarely changed, and often re-used across a number of accounts.

Any account with a shared or re-used password can be an easy target for a hacker or corrupt insider. There is also rarely a record of which team member published each post — increasing the possibility of a false alert being deliberate and untraceable.

Just two minutes after the missile alert was issued on Twitter in Hawaii, the governor was told it was a false alarm. While other government officials rushed to assure the public there was nothing to worry about, the governor did not tweet for more than 17 minutes. The cause of his silence? He forgot his username and password.

To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged. That way, simple acts of forgetting, sharing or re-using passwords won’t cause delays, such as what happened in Hawaii.

Privileged account security tips

As best practice to properly secure and protect social media accounts, government departments should employ privileged account security, including:

  • Arrange transparent access: To make it harder for hackers to find and exploit credentials, authorised users must be able to seamlessly authenticate access to an account without having to remember passwords. This allows for immediate access in emergency situations, such as the incident in Hawaii.
  • Remove shared credentials: Use a digital vault to store passwords and remove the accountability challenges of shared logins. Users will then need to login individually for access to shared social media platforms.
  • Automate password rotations: Continuously changing privileged credentials safeguards against attackers using retired passwords. Regularly automating password changes can also update access privileges, reducing the possibility of an outsider getting their hands on valid credentials.
  • Review account activity: For visibility of individual users’ activity across social media accounts, a record of events can be created. This way, posts can be linked to authorised users, and rogue employees can be more easily identified.

Governments the world over are reviewing their critical infrastructure safeguards and national security precautions. As we continue to see in situations such as those in the US, Hawaii, and Japan, the public has developed a huge level of trust in communications distributed by government organisations.

Social media has become a credible and dependable medium for official communications, and it’s clear these platforms are neither inherently secure nor infallible. It’s critical to re-think how any medium used for official and emergency communications is treated and secured.

[“source=cnbc”]