India Men Show: A glamorous show to accelerate men’s lifestyle and the latest fashion trends in India

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The guest list also included industrialists, businessmen, bureaucrats, influencers, restaurateurs, politicians, diplomats, expats, and socialites.

The inaugural edition of “India Men Show” took place on April 18, 2019, at the Metropolitan Hotel, New Delhi. It was a luxury evening dedicated to celebrating men’s lifestyle choices. The evening encompassed a panel discussion on changing trends in men’s lifestyle industry, ‘Man of Substance’ awards to honor select iconic men from different walks of life and a curated fashion presentation by menswear labels.

“India Men Show” evolves from the fact that men are becoming increasingly style savvy and are making informed lifestyle choices more than ever before. Be it fashion, grooming, fitness, travel, machines, technology or personal space, they are investing smartly in factors that determine their way of life. However, the event finds its purpose in encouraging modern men to become significantly aware of their lifestyle decisions and their impact on society.

The guest list also included industrialists, businessmen, bureaucrats, influencers, restaurateurs, politicians, diplomats, expats, and socialites.

Panel Discussion: Former Indian cricketer Anjum Chopra was in conversation with Bobby John Varkey, (Editor-in-Charge, The Man Magazine), Sunil Sethi (President, FDCI), Malvinder Singh Ricky (Former COO, Taj Hotels), Rajiv Makhni (Tech Guru), Sangram Singh (wrestler). They decoded changing trends in men’s lifestyle.

‘Man of Substance’ awards
This felicitation is a celebration of select men’s bold decisions and their lifestyle choices. These shakers and movers have set remarkable examples in society. And they are a role model for the millennials of India.

Some of the well-known names were honored with “Man of Substance” award include Amit Burman (VP, Dabur India), Raghava Rao (Vice President, Finance & amp; India CFO at Amazon India), Zorawar Kalra (Founder, Massive Restaurants), Navin Ansal (Founder, Casa Pop), Raghav Verma (Co-founder, Chaayos), Sunil Sethi (President, FDCI), Sabbas Joseph (Founder, Wizcraft), Tarun Thakral (Founder, Heritage Transport Museum), Sangram Singh (Wrestler), Samir Suhag (Polo Player), Sachin Atulkar (IPS Officer, Online sensation), Rajiv Makhni (Tech Guru), Jamal Shaikh (Editor, HT Brunch) and Martin Howard (Social Activist).

India Men Show 2019 was supported by leading names – BMW as Lifestyle Partner, Wikka and Ayurveda as Gifting partners, United Breweries and Fishing Cat as Beverage Partner, The Metropolitan Hotel & AMP; Spa as Hospitality Partner, The Man and Exotica magazine as Media partners, Brand Stand Bespoke Communications as PR Partner, Crystal Hues as Digital Partner and Red 93.5 Fm as Radio Partner.

[“source=financialexpress”]

5 Easy Hacks to Customize and Perfect Your Shoes

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We celebrate and glorify running shoes at Runner’s World, but we also aren’t afraid to modify and customize them. After all, they’re a tool to help you accomplish your goals. Here are our favorite tweaks to make footwear meet our needs.


No-Slip Grip

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TREVOR RAAB

You don’t need a fancy traction device to run on snow and ice. Hit the hardware store for #10 x 3/8-inch hex-head screws. Drilling into the thickest parts of the sole, add six on the forefoot and four on the heel. You can take them out quickly (with a power drill) to run in dry conditions, and replace the screws when they wear down.

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AMAZON

What You Need:
#10 X 3/8″ Stainless Slotted Hex Washer Head Screw $10


Lace to Fit

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TREVOR RAAB

A few years ago, we got shoes that were missing a top eyelet. The heel slipped, so we grabbed a pair of hole-punch pliers and added our own. These pliers are essential for runners who want to adjust the lacing of their shoes to fix fit issues.

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AMAZON

What You Need:
General Tools Hole Punch Tool $7


Install Drainage

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TREVOR RAAB

A problem with too many shoes is that when water gets in through the top, there’s no way for it to get out. Break out a ¼-inch drill bit and add six holes through the thinnest spots on the forefoot. When you run, you’ll pump the water out.

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AMAZON

What you need:
Bosch 18V Compact 1/2″ Drill/Driver Kit $129


Patch It Up

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TREVOR RAAB

A common tool for runners until recently was Shoe Goo. Parts were always coming loose on shoes. That doesn’t happen much anymore, but occasionally a rubber patch will work loose. Just add a dab of glue and stick it back on.

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AMAZON

What you need:
Shoe Goo Repair Adhesive $6


Let ’Em Breathe

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TREVOR RAAB

If you find a new shoe causes blisters on your pinky toe late in runs when your feet swell, or presses a little too much on a bunion. Take an X-Acto knife to the upper and cut a window, or make small slits over the areas of pressure for extra room.

[“source=runnersworld”]

Soundarya Rajinikanth And Vishagan Vanangamudi Arrive At The Wedding Venue. See Pics

Soundarya Rajinikanth And Vishagan Vanangamudi Arrive At The Wedding Venue. See PicsNEW DELHI: 

Actor Rajinikanth and his family have arrived at the Leela Palace Hotel in Chennai, where his younger daughter Soundarya will soon marry actor-businessman Vishagan Vanangamudi as per south Indian rituals. News agency ANI shared a photo of the father of the bride waving at the shutterbugs stationed outside the hotel and also a picture of the bride all ready to walk down the aisle. The photographers also got a glimpse of groom Vishagan Vanangamudi arriving at the venue with his family. Earlier, Soundarya’s make-up artist Prakruthi Ananth shared glimpses of the bride, revealing that Soundarya has opted for Abu Jani Sandeep Khosla couture for her big day.

Here are ANI tweets showing Rainikanth, Soundarya and Vishagan Vanangamudi at the wedding venue:

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These are screenshots from Prakruthi Ananth’s Instagram story, detailing the bride’s look:

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Actor Kamal Haasan is also expected to attend the wedding today. Last week, pictures of Rajinikanth and Kamal Haasan’s meeting went viral and it was reported that the 2.0 star has invited his colleague to his daughter’s wedding.

Before the wedding, Rajinikanth and his family hosted a pre-wedding reception for family and close friends on Friday, which was followed by a combined sangeet and mehendiceremony. Soundarya posted a few pictures from Saturday’s ceremony and wrote: “Blessed and grateful beyond words!!!! The three most important men in my life… my darling father… my angel son… and now you my Vishagan.”

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How Australian theatre is failing its sound designers and composers

A white middle-aged man in a theatre, with a guitar and headphones, frowning

“In the last couple of years, I’ve seen a lot of my colleagues drop out of the industry; a lot of them burn out and suffer serious mental health crises,” Edmondson told the ABC.

“David White’s letter resonated with me. We’re not far off that situation happening in Australia and I’ve seen people come uncomfortably close to that kind of point in their life because of the pressure in the job, and lack of understanding and support.”

Two jobs for the price of one

“Sound and composition … has the ability to truly creep its way into the back of the minds of the audience and help shape their engagement with the play, without being particularly overt. I think that’s a lot of the reason why it’s often overlooked,” Edmondson says.

Sound designers are responsible for all the sound elements in a production, from sound effects and mic-ing up performers to setting up speaker systems.

Edmondson, whose recent credits include Sydney Theatre Company’s award-winning six-hour epic The Harp In The South (sound designer, working with composer The Sweats) and Blackie Blackie Brown(assistant sound designer, to designer/composer Steve Toulmin), says sound designers often resort to unexpected sounds to achieve the desired effect.

In Blackie Blackie Brown, for example, Edmondson had to ask himself: “What is the sound of a giant pair of testicles exploding? … You’ve got to get creative.”

One solution? The “mating cry of foxes” — which when slowed-down sounds “low and haunting”.

A grey-haired middle-aged man with headphones around his neck gazes moodily into the cameraPHOTO: Stefan Gregory is a composer and sound designer who has been working in Australian theatre for 15 years. (ABC Arts: Teresa Tan)

Composers, meanwhile, write and arrange music for a production — but in today’s theatre, the roles of composer and sound designer are often combined.

Stefan Gregory, who won Best Sound Design at this year’s Sydney Theatre Awards for his work on The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui (STC), is a composer and sound designer who has been working in Australian theatre for 15 years.

Gregory says the trend towards combining the two roles emerged within the last 10 years, as composers increasingly began to work electronically.

To hear this story and all the latest stories from stages across the country and beyond, subscribe to The Stage Show.

“The composition/sound design is expected to be fed actively into the room right through the rehearsal process,” Edmondson says.

After the day’s rehearsal, the sound designer/composer writes and mixes the music before programming it into the software. Then (hopefully) the director approves — or they’re forced to go back to the drawing board.

“Once you hit the theatre [for tech week] … you tend to come in for a 9am start and you’ll tend to work through till the theatre closes, which is generally 11pm. But larger productions you might not be out the door until midnight,” says Edmondson.

“If you’re a composer, you go home and sometimes rewrite a whole piece of music and you might be up to 3 or 4am and then back into the theatre early again.”

Gregory concurs, saying that in the final weeks of rehearsals he often works between 90 to 100-hour weeks.

And it’s not just the hours that are taxing.

“You’ve got to put your soul into this music — with the knowledge that someone’s going to listen to it for about three seconds and go ‘Nup, that’s not right’,” he says.

He estimates the ratio of music abandoned as opposed to used in the production as 10:1.

“The sound designers and composers I know all work extraordinarily hard and kill themselves, pretty much.”

Living ‘hand-to-mouth’

J David Franzke is a Melbourne-based Green Room Award-winning sound designer and composer who has worked in the industry for 25 years. Last year, he worked on Melbourne Theatre Company’s production of The Architect; currently he is working on Malthouse’s forthcoming production of Cloudstreet.

“If you’re working as a sound designer in live theatre you’re doing it as a passion. It’s not a sensible career choice,” Franzke says.

A middle-aged white man sits at a desk working on his computer, a dog in his lapPHOTO: Franzke describes his financial circumstances as “hand-to-mouth”. (ABC RN: Hannah Reich)

“I feel like I’ve spent the best part of 25 years with my nose down, tail up, just boring along working. I’ve popped out the other side and gone: ‘Oh! Where are all the things you’re meant to have when you’re almost 50?’ Like a house or a car, I don’t have any of that.”

Franzke works for 6-week blocks at a time on shows.

He describes his financial circumstances as “hand-to-mouth”.

Edmondson says he’s able to make a living wage but that he puts his “hourly rate for theatre work at between $15 and $18 per hour”. In his Facebook post, he said: “The janitors make more money out of my shows than I do (no shade to janitors, of course).”

Gregory says the hourly rate for being both composer and sound designer is “not good”, and says he chooses to work for companies that pay on the higher end of the industry’s spectrum.

“I will be going back to finding work as computer programmer this year — despite being one of the most in-demand in my field and having plenty of shows offered to me in Australia and overseas — because I want more free time to work on projects that are meaningful to me.”

The changing scope of sound design

A hand with wedding ring and watch adjusting knobs on a sound deskPHOTO: Sound design has changed significantly in the last 10 years. (ABC Arts: Teresa Tan)

“Sound designers/composers are paid a flat fee and that hasn’t really changed much at all in the last 10 years,” Edmonson says.

“It’s been fairly static — as have most of the fees of other creative departments — but unlike other departments, sound design has changed a lot in its scope in that time.”

With the rise of prestige TV, theatre audiences have come to expect more complex and immersive sound design, and technology has emerged that can realise that.

These developments have meant that delivery time for work has been cut down while tech costs have gone up. Edmondson says sound professionals need between $10-20,000 worth of equipment to start out in the industry.

Inequity in the industry

In order to remedy “the significant gender inequity” in the industry, Theatre Networks Australia has compiled a list of female, non-binary, and trans designers.

But one woman who has been working regularly in Australian theatre as a sound designer and composer is Kim “Busty Beatz” Bowers, with recent credits including cabaret show Hot Brown Honey and The Longest Minute (a co-production by Queensland Theatre and JUTE Theatre Company).

A black woman with a mic singing in front of a laptop on stage.PHOTO: Sound designer and composer Kim “Busty Beatz” Bowers says the theatre industry is not conducive to being a mother. (Supplied: Sean Young)

“I’m a mother and the theatre is not very conducive to that — especially [the role] of a sound artist. It’s a lot of late nights, and I wouldn’t say that I’m treated that great,” Bowers says.

“The last project I did seven drafts … a lot of that is hours that aren’t paid for,” she adds.

And it’s not just late nights that Bowers has to contend with.

“[I deal with] attitudes, ideas that because you’re a black woman, a woman of colour, that you’re only going to have a certain skill base, that you only work in a certain way … insidious stuff that is full-on.”

Better pay, recognition and education

While other designers in theatre are represented by the Australian Production Design Guild, Edmondson says sound designers are lacking specific union representation to advocate for change.

Yet, the time might be ripe for change.

“With all the cultural shift that we’re seeing in theatre at the moment surrounding safe spaces, mental health, appropriate behaviour and inclusion … I think that’s really opened the door for more honest, frank conversations,” says Edmonson.

“I’m seeing people really suffering from being overwhelmed and burnt out by this workload and … there’s such a small pool already in the industry to begin with, we just can’t afford to lose these people.”

The answer for Edmondson is better pay, improved mental health support, and bringing composers and sound designers on board earlier in the production process.

All of the practitioners interviewed for this piece feel that raising awareness is a crucial part of effecting change.

“It is about actually recognising the workload and recognising the number of hours [involved],” says Bowers.

Gregory says: “I think what’s really happening for the role is that it’s just become a lot more work than it used to be 10 years ago, and I think theatre companies haven’t really caught up … I find that I have to explain my role to pretty much every theatre company I work for.”

 

 

[“source=abc.net.au”]

The founders of Aje talk opening MBFWA, connecting through fashion and the future of their label

Everything you need to know ahead of MBFWA.

Edwina Forest and Adrian Norris, the co-founders of Australian fashion label Aje, have undeniably cemented their brand as one to watch. Worn by the likes of Alessandra Ambrosio, Shay Mitchell and Isabel Lucas, Aje has become a go-to for universally flattering and feminine silhouettes that transcend seasonal fads and fleeting trends.

As such, it comes as no surprise that Aje has been selected to open Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia 2019 with the presentation of its resort 2020 collection. Following in the footsteps of fellow ‘Mercedes Benz Presents’ designers Camilla & Marc (2018), Dion Lee (2017) and Toni Maticevski (2016), the label will kick off the week-long festivities on May 12 at a yet-to-be-disclosed location.

Proud to be embarking on the label’s second decade by headlining Australian fashion week, Norris said that the honour is “a statement of recognition for our brand, but also for our loyal clients, many of whom have been with us for 11 years, and who continue to grow along this journey with us.”

“We always seek to offer them something truly unique,” he added. “And we look forward to making this a milestone moment with them in mind.”

Speaking with Vogue, Forest teased the highly-anticipated resort collection, explaining that the label will continue to “further acknowledge and celebrate the duality inside us all and to salute the diversity and contrast within this extraordinary land we call home.”

“With this opportunity we want to really connect with hearts and tell our story in the most powerful way yet,” said Norris, who went on to reveal that the collection was in part inspired by the rawness of the Australian coastline.

When quizzed on where the future of the label lies, the co-founders and creatives shared that they intend for 2019 to be somewhat of a turning point for Aje, with the brand looking to make a concerted effort to “reach out and touch the hearts of like-minded women, at home and around the world.”

Crediting their success to their considered and strategic approach, together with their ability to never look back, it’s easy to see how Aje has managed to reach the milestone that is opening MBFWA in just 11 short years.

 

[“source=vogue”]

 

Verily wants to make smart shoes that track weight and falls

Photo by Andy Buchanan / WPA Pool/ Getty Images

Google’s sister company Verily wants to make a smart shoe that can track weight and monitor falls, according to CNBC. The company has allegedly been looking for partners to develop this shoe and bring it to market, but it’s very early in the process.

Fall detection seems to have become an increasingly popular feature for wellness gadgets, given that the newest Apple Watch has a similar feature. This makes sense due to the growing number of Baby Boomers and the very real risk of injury that falls pose. In fact, falls are the number one cause of injuries and deaths from injury for elderly Americans, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and preventing falls truly could save lives.

The shoe fits in with other projects from Verily (formerly Google Life Sciences), which include contact lenses for farsightedness and a special spoon for people with movement disorders. That said, Verily is hardly the first company to look into smart shoes for this purpose. E-VONE makes smart shoes in 26 styles, and all of them contain sensors that will notify someone when you fall. But both E-VONE and Verily and everyone else’s smart shoes will need to contend with the same problems: few people want to wear the same shoes every day, and many people don’t wear shoes indoors. At least a smart shoe is a better fall-prevention idea than the $800 airbag belt.

[“source=theverge”]