Halston review – glitzy 70s designer all dressed up

Trendsetter … Halston with Liza Minnelli.

In the 70s, the American designer Halston was one of fashion’s biggest stars. But since his death from an Aids-related illness in 1990, his reputation has dimmed, despite attempts to revive his company (one of them involving Harvey Weinstein and Sarah Jessica Parker). Now comes this flattering, myth-inflating documentary by Frédéric Tcheng, who gives us the story of Roy Halston Frowick, a kid from Des Moines, Iowa, who reinvented himself in New York as a milliner to the super-rich and joined the big league by putting Jackie Kennedy in a pillbox hat at JFK’s inauguration. He became one-name famous by designing party dresses that one interviewee gigglingly describes as best worn without knickers.

This profile has a pretentious – and pointless – framing device in which fashion writer Tavi Gevinson plays a fictional archivist who turns detective to investigate his life. As well as understanding the fashion mood of the 70s, Halston savvily realised that dressing his beautiful celebrity pals Liza Minnelli, Anjelica Huston and Bianca Jagger was the best possible advertisement. He also increased diversity on the runway, promoting African American models, and his muse was Pat Ast, the frizzy-haired size-20 actor who had worked with Andy Warhol.

His secretary pinpoints the beginning of the end for Halston as the opening of the Studio 54 nightclub, where he picked up a $1,000-a-week cocaine habit. He spent money like crazy, once sending a private plane to fetch his dinner. Then there were the business decisions. In 1983, he signed a disastrous $1bn deal with the US high-street chain JC Penney – appalling his elite fanbase. By 1984, Halston lost the rights to his name and company.

The archive clips suggest Halston is a role Richard E Grant was born to play: the designer had a long-limbed loucheness, grandiose affectations and put-on accent, along with a fierce perfectionism.

[“source=theguardian”]

Adidas Ensuring That All Their Shoes Can Be 100% Recycled into New Ones Without Any Waste

Image result for ShoesAdidas has already been making great strides to rid the world of plastic waste – and now they are taking it one step further by introducing a 100% recyclable performance running shoe that is “made to be remade.”

Sports footwear typically include complex material mixes and component gluing which result in a shoe that can only be downcycled.

After almost a decade of research and development, however, Adidas has refined the process to create the Futurecraft.Loop: a shoe that uses only one type of material and no glue.

Each component is made from 100% reusable TPU – it’s spun to yarn, knitted, molded and clean-fused. Once the shoes come to the end of their first life and are returned to Adidas – they are washed, ground to pellets and melted into material for components for a new pair of shoes, with zero waste and nothing thrown away.

The project is aimed at tackling the problem of plastic waste, enabling a “closed loop” or circular manufacturing model, where the raw materials can be repurposed again and again. But not just repurposed into a water bottle or a tote – but into another pair of high-performance running shoes.

In 2015, Adidas introduced the first footwear concept with its upper materials made entirely of yarns and filaments from reclaimed and recycled marine plastic waste and illegal deep-sea gillnets. In 2019, Adidas will produce 11 million pairs of shoes containing recycled ocean plastic through intercepting plastic waste on beaches, remote islands, and in coastal communities.

Adidas is now committed to using only recycled polyester in every one of their products and applications where a solution exists by 2024.

“Taking plastic waste out of the system is the first step, but we can’t stop there,” said Eric Liedtke, an Executive Board Member at adidas. “What happens to your shoes after you’ve worn them out? You throw them away – except there is no away. There are only landfills and incinerators and ultimately an atmosphere choked with excess carbon, or oceans filled with plastic waste. The next step is to end the concept of ‘waste’ entirely. Our dream is that you can keep wearing the same shoes over and over again.

“Futurecraft.Loop is our first running shoe that is made to be remade. It is a statement of our intent to take responsibility for the entire life of our product; proof that we can build high-performance running shoes that you don’t have to throw away.”

The first generation of Futurecraft.Loop is rolling out as part of a global beta program with 200 influencers from across the world’s major cities. Adidas is asking them to run, return the shoes, and share feedback on their experience ahead of the second-generation drop.

The insights will then be used to shape the roadmap for the wider release targeted for the spring or summer of 2021.

Tanyaradzwa Sahanga, who is the manager of Adidas’s innovation department, commented: “There were times when it didn’t seem like we could get over some of the technical hurdles – now we’ve made the first leap, the playing field has changed.

“We cannot create a circular future on our own, we are going to need each other. We’re excited to see this first step come to life as part of the beta launch.”

[“source=goodnewsnetwork”]

This Latina Fashion Designer Shares All She Has Learned Since Selling Her First Dress

Alexia Maria Alexia Maria

Alexia María started designing clothes for herself long before she ever designed a look for anyone else. Over time, and thanks to word of mouth and a strong social media presence, María was able to build a brand that has led to actors like America Ferrera and singers like Gwen Stefani wearing her looks.

In growing the brand from a business that sold primarily to friends and family to one that can be shopped at two flagship locations – one in California and one in New York — as well as online, María had to learn to juggle the demands from both the creative and business side of any new business.

“It takes a lot of discipline and a great team to give your 100% to both sides,” shares María. “With the help of my amazing team, I am able to completely focus on design when I need to. With their support I am able to let go of the business side for a while and just dive into designing.”

As an immigrant and Latina in the fashion space, María understands that women are layered and that the clothes they choose to wear reflect their heart above all.

“If you are comfortable with what you are wearing, you will be confident and be the best version of yourself,” notes María.

Below María shares her advice to other designers and entrepreneurs, how her Latinidad has influenced the trajectory of her career, and how she navigated making the jump to being a fashion designer.

[“source=forbes]

Great cheap accessories for all the stuff you bought on Black Friday

Quick note: If you live in SE Michigan, come check me out tonight at the Livonia Public Library at 7 p.m. Learn my favorite money-saving secrets and enjoy a good chance at winning some raffle prizes!

I’ll admit it — I’m glad Black Friday and Cyber Monday are in the rear view. Because although there were some colossal deals this year, it’s exhausting to sort, track and share them all!

That said, you cannot imagine the Herculean efforts of countless CNET writers and editors, who’ve been doing all that sorting, tracking and sharing for weeks. To say this was a team effort is an understatement. I was a tiny cog in the much greater Black Friday machine, and my fellow deal finders deserve a ton of credit. (And a beer — next round’s on me!)

Before we dive into today’s deals, which are all about improving the products you might have scored during the past few days, let me pause to talk about charity. Today is Giving Tuesday, and even if your wallet is empty, you can support worthy causes without spending a dime. Please consider helping those less fortunate. It’s much quicker and easier than you think.

On to business. Did you score an awesome new toy during the sale madness of the past couple weeks? Let’s talk about some accessories you might want to add — and some surprisingly cheap ones at that.

You bought a new phone

speck-stay-clear-iphone-xr
Don’t overpay for a phone case; anything over $10-15 is probably too much.

Sarah Tew/CNET

It doesn’t matter if you spent $200 or $1,200 — the first order of business is a case. Because, let’s face it, gravity happens. Here’s what you shouldn’t do: Buy an expensive case from Apple, AT&T, Verizon or some other retailer. You may have bought your phone there, but cases are best sourced elsewhere.

My advice: Hit up Amazon and Ebay. Just search for cases for your phone model and you’ll find a dizzying array of choices. Hard cases, soft cases, clear ones, colored ones and so on. Even better, you’ll find lots of them priced around $10-15 — much better than the $30-50 you’re likely to pay in store.

Read more: iPhone XR cases: 4 cheap alternatives to Apple’s $40 one

Of course, putting your phone in a case doesn’t guarantee 100-percent protection against pavement encounters. The best protection is not dropping your phone in the first place, which is why I continue to champion Phone Straps (formerly Ninja Loops).

See it at Phone Loops

A mere $5 buys you a stylish strap that attaches to just about any phone case. Once you get accustomed to sliding your fingers underneath it, you’ll find it much easier to grip your phone — and you’ll be much less likely to drop it.

This remains one of my all-time favorite products. It makes a great gift, too, which is why you should buy at least three (which bags you free shipping).

You bought a Nintendo Switch

Switch deals were everywhere this year — and often quite fleeting. Now that you have the console, though, you might want to consider a couple accessories — starting with a mobile charger.

The Switch relies on a USB-C input, though you don’t necessarily need a power bank that has a USB-C output. Those tend to cost a bit more, though they have the advantage of recharging your console more quickly than a standard 5V USB-A port.

omars-power-bank
This Switch-friendly mobile chargers is a very good deal at $23.

Omars

Here’s a good option: The Omars 10,000-mAh Power Bank for $22.99 (minus a 5-percent coupon you can click to add). It features USB-A and USB-C outputs, the latter featuring 18-watt Power Delivery (PD) for fast Switch charging.

[“source=ndtv”]