How Designer Marcelo Burlon County of Milan Developed A Mature Collaboration With Muhammad Ali

Marcelo Burlon  photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Whether drawn by splendid designs or heartfelt recollections, or the curiosity of what will be the next big thing, streetwear has  proudly proven its sustainability in a volatile fashion marketplace. Make no bones about it, streetwear is meant to be enjoyed and experienced in the proper fashion. Rich textures and hues mesmerize the consumers with waves of exotic yet familiar styles. Streetwear is street fashion that saw its humble beginnings take root in California’s surf and skate culture. Since then, it has grown to encompass elements of hip-hop fashion, Japanese street fashion, and lately modern haute couture fashion. Streetwear more than often centers on more relaxed pieces such as jeans, baseball caps, hoodies and sneakers.

Nevertheless, let me be clear; streetwear was born in the USA. Throughout history, the USA has played a significantly creative role in fashion and quite often we don’t give ourselves a good pat on the back for our creative developments on fashions timeline of history. The movement is born out of the Los Angeles surf culture of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Even if we look as legendary surfboard designer Shawn Stussy, you’ll find that he began selling printed T-shirts featuring the same trademark signature he used on his custom surfboards. At first, he was selling the Stussy items from his own car. Soon thereafter he expanded sales to boutiques once popularity has increased and Stussy had become a household name. To be clear, the two most important components of streetwear is T-shirts and exclusivity. Early streetwear brands took inspiration from the DIY aesthetic of punk, new wave, heavy metal and later hip hop cultures. Subsequently. well-known sportswear and fashion brands attached themselves to the emerging early 1980s hip hop scene such as Kangol and Adidas. At this point, the game just got interesting. Nike’s signing of soon-to-be basketball superstar Michael Jordan from their  rival Adidas in 1984 changed the game altogether, as Nike now dominated the urban streetwear sneaker market in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Moving forward, we witnessed brand launches by the chief executives of major record companies with then heavyweights Russell Simmons of Def Jam launching his Phat Farm label, Sean Combs of Bad Boy with Sean John, and Jay-Z and Damon Dash of Roc-a-Fella Records launching Rocawear.  Years later, even rap superstar 50 Cent launched his G-Unit clothing label, with the sneaker rights given to Reebok.  This simply meant that the big fashion companies not only  saw a future in streetwear but rather  embraced the streetwear culture. So where does this leave streetwear now? Recently, we find an increase in established luxury brands entering into the market. Last year, Louis Vuitton proudly named Virgil Abloh (Off-White brand) as the brand menswear creative director. So then, what really popularized the streetwear trend? In a word, the decline of formal wear led to the rise of streetwear fashion. I recently reviewed a streetwear designer brand that peaked my interest.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Marcelo Burlon was born in Argentinia. His approach to fashion has caught the attention of new generations on his very own rainbow tour of the social-media era. Moving with his parents to Porto Potenza Picena in Italy at 14, he would become a notorious club kid in Rimini. That was until a career organizing events for major fashion houses and DJ-ing relocated him to Milan in 2012 and paved the way for the launch of his streetwear brand Marcelo Burlon County of Milan. Five years on, he has become a fan phenomenon in Italy and beyond, and the poster boy for a new wave of fashion entrepreneurs who are set on challenging the establishment.

[“source=forbes]

Could social media emerge as a new critical infrastructure sector?

Social media has become an important conduit for official and emergency government communications with the public. With such communications having the power to critically affect national security, social networks have become a hacker’s paradise and need to be taken more seriously.

US President Donald Trump’s official Twitter account is one example of how social media is now a popular channel for engaging with the public in realtime. At the more extreme end of the scale, recent events in Hawaii and Japan saw false missile alerts sent due to human error, causing populations to spiral into turmoil. These incidents highlight how social media accounts are becoming part of the critical infrastructure that governs our day-to-day lives.

It’s clear that communications, or mis-communications, of this kind have the potential to wreak havoc. But the question is: should the use of these social media accounts — like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and more — for official and emergency purposes, be regulated by legislation?

“Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.”

In Australia, telecommunications carriers are subject to the Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms (TSSR), while other critical infrastructure falls under the recently introduced Security of Critical Infrastructure Act (2018). This act is primarily focused on major infrastructure assets like power and water, that supply essential services to more than 100,000 people.

In both the TSSR and the act, scope is given for the relevant minister to direct a provider or intermediary “to do, or not do, a specified thing that is reasonably necessary to protect networks and facilities from national security risks.”

Under the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act, the relevant minister can also nominate additional industry centres for inclusion, provided the minister is satisfied there is a risk that the assets or services could have a prejudicial effect on national security.

Top of the priority list currently are airports and data centres. It’s possible the minister will declare social media communications as subject to the act, but, at this stage, it’s unlikely.

Top-grade cybersecurity practices essential

So, what should governments be doing when it comes to securing social media accounts used for timely or sensitive communications? Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.

Government personnel operating social media for official or emergency purposes should undertake a review of how their accounts are managed. Hardening communication platforms should include stepping up password management practices. This will help eliminate the chance of delays to the delivery of critical information or the exploitation of accounts for nefarious purposes, such as issuing false or misleading information.

“To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged.”

Hackers know the value and vulnerability of social media today, and are already hijacking official accounts. In 2017, a rogue Twitter employee shut down Donald Trump’s Twitter account for 11 minutes in an act of protest.

Disgruntled employees aren’t the only risk – hackers could use any one of several social engineering techniques, such as phishing, to gain access to passwords for social media. If they did so, they’d be able to issue false statements on a public social media account, potentially causing fear and panic.

Government personnel within specific departments or offices commonly share access to social media accounts. This means that potentially dozens of people throughout an agency have access, admin or editing rights on these platforms. Not least, passwords for these accounts are usually shared between team members, rarely changed, and often re-used across a number of accounts.

Any account with a shared or re-used password can be an easy target for a hacker or corrupt insider. There is also rarely a record of which team member published each post — increasing the possibility of a false alert being deliberate and untraceable.

Just two minutes after the missile alert was issued on Twitter in Hawaii, the governor was told it was a false alarm. While other government officials rushed to assure the public there was nothing to worry about, the governor did not tweet for more than 17 minutes. The cause of his silence? He forgot his username and password.

To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged. That way, simple acts of forgetting, sharing or re-using passwords won’t cause delays, such as what happened in Hawaii.

Privileged account security tips

As best practice to properly secure and protect social media accounts, government departments should employ privileged account security, including:

  • Arrange transparent access: To make it harder for hackers to find and exploit credentials, authorised users must be able to seamlessly authenticate access to an account without having to remember passwords. This allows for immediate access in emergency situations, such as the incident in Hawaii.
  • Remove shared credentials: Use a digital vault to store passwords and remove the accountability challenges of shared logins. Users will then need to login individually for access to shared social media platforms.
  • Automate password rotations: Continuously changing privileged credentials safeguards against attackers using retired passwords. Regularly automating password changes can also update access privileges, reducing the possibility of an outsider getting their hands on valid credentials.
  • Review account activity: For visibility of individual users’ activity across social media accounts, a record of events can be created. This way, posts can be linked to authorised users, and rogue employees can be more easily identified.

Governments the world over are reviewing their critical infrastructure safeguards and national security precautions. As we continue to see in situations such as those in the US, Hawaii, and Japan, the public has developed a huge level of trust in communications distributed by government organisations.

Social media has become a credible and dependable medium for official communications, and it’s clear these platforms are neither inherently secure nor infallible. It’s critical to re-think how any medium used for official and emergency communications is treated and secured.

[“source=cnbc”]

A New Accelerator Model Tackles Fashion Industry’s Supply Chains

Factory45 and Market45 founder Shannon Lohr wants to help smaller startups in the sustainable fashion space.Factory45

After launching her own apparel brand {r}evolution apparel,  Shannon Lohr was burnt out. She had raised more than $60,000 on Kickstarter in 2011 to bring the idea to life and then taken it to stores across the country. But she needed a break.

She did just that and came back with a new approach to changing the fashion industry — consulting new up-and-coming brands. Her latest platform, Market45 complements Factory45, an online accelerator program that takes sustainable apparel brands from idea to launch. Market45 offers to house their creations and connect them with online customers.

Lohr says that it was her firsthand experience of starting a company and how difficult it can be that led her to set up Factory45. Specifically, she says knows the uphill battle that it takes to break into the fashion industry where supply chains are complex and often inaccessible to smaller brands. Factory45 was the first part of the solution: a business school for sustainable fashion startups, helping connect entrepreneurs with sustainable suppliers around the world.

But this realization took time, nearly a decade. In 2011, Lohr and a friend decided to launch sustainable fashion brand {r}evolution. Following a Kickstarter campaign that became the highest-funded fashion project in Kickstarter history at the time, the pair tripled their goal and quadrupled their first production run. After a sustainable fashion tour of the Pacific Northwest, the two were exhausted though.

At the end of 2012, Lohr sold her portion of the company to her co-founder and moved into consulting, putting to use all the skills she’d picked up during her own stint as an apparel entrepreneur. Although she had stepped away from running her own brand, Lohr realized that all the time she had spent fighting to get her foot through the door could save other designers the effort.

[“source=forbes]

A Fashion Photographer Shows How To Shoot Nudes In The MeToo Era

NEW YORK, NY – Sadie Newman, Megan Williams, Alexina Graham, and Russell James prepare backstage for the 2018 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show on November 8, 2018. (Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)Getty

In 2014, fashion photographer Russell James released Angels, a 304-page book of black-and-white nude or intimate photos of top models he met through his work with Victoria’s Secret, including stars like Lily Aldridge, Gisele Bündchen, and Adriana Lima. (The book takes its name from the Victoria’s Secret Angels.) This was, James recently told me, largely an archival project. After a few years working as a photographer in other countries, James, originally from Australia, came to America as a generalist photographer in 1996, struck it big with iconic covers for magazines like Sports Illustrated, and has been shooting for Victoria’s Secret since 1997. So he was sitting on a massive photo trove. But it went over extremely well—especially with models, some of whom apparently told James they were disappointed that he didn’t include any photos of them. So on December 1st, James will release a 448-page collectors edition of Angels featuring new models.

But the cultural climate in 2018, as others have noted, is drastically different than that of 2014. Fashion and nude photography have, like so many other industries, come into the spotlight for a critical reevaluation. Longstanding conversations about whether these art forms empower or objectify their female subjects, contributing to a toxic and patriarchic world, have gained newfound traction. And since the start of the year, major stories have come to light of famous photographers and other art and fashion bigwigs taking abusive advantage of models. “There is certainly not no risk in doing something like this” in the current cultural moment, admits James. So I recently asked him how his awareness of the cultural climate affected the way he produced and positioned this project.

James, it is worth noting, has a solid reputation among his subjects and collaborators. Some of this may stem from the fact that he has never considered himself a “nude photographer,” doing naked or near-naked shoots for their own sake or for male eyes. He is equally fond of landscapes, for instance, and seems to see nude photography through a similar lens. (“I do love the light,” he says, “the form, the shape of the nude.”) Much more of it stems from his personal commitment to only shooting subjects with whom he can build rapport and trust. He has long avoided crude direction and overt sexualization, instead giving models a considerable amount of agency in their own portrayal.

That is clear in most of his work, but should be especially so in this new edition of Angels. Unlike his first archival image-based edition, since 2014 James has been working with each of the 35 new models in this version as full-fledged collaborators. Each of them took as much power as they wanted over the shoot itself, the photo selections, and the editing process. “I was able to really deliberately say, ‘okay, I want to do this,’” says James. “‘We can either work off my ideas or your ideas or a combination of ideas. We can look at the film and edit together.’” That seems to be part of why the book took four years to put together—a lot of scheduling effort with busy folks.

[“source=forbes]

How This Former Fashion Exec Changed Her Career With A Baby In Tow

Miles and Milan founder, Shennel FullerMiles and Milan

For this former retail executive, becoming an entrepreneur was the realization of a life-long dream. But it wasn’t until the birth of her first son that Shennel Fuller decided to create her own children’s clothing line, Miles and Milan.

And according to TendLab CEO and Co-founder, Amy Henderson, there is no better time to make this decision:

…any parent who leaves their child to go to work—whether it’s a choice or financial necessity—must grapple with the distance it creates. There are times when we want to be with them, and we can’t be. And this forces us to question what we are doing, and why we are doing it. Answering this question forges us, like steel in molten fire, into stronger, more motivated versions of our former selves.

Like other successful entrepreneurs who leave the corporate world beyond, Fuller followed the fire in her belly and refused to take no for an answer. Her tenacity and fortitude were inherited; as she is the daughter of hard-working immigrant parents who instilled in her, an unparalleled work ethic.

With the support of her husband, parents and sister, this founder charted her own course to becoming an entrepreneur and hopes to inspire other women to do the same.

Fuller: My entrepreneurial journey started three years ago after my first son, Jackson was born. My background is corporate, and I’ve held a few executive positions. I was teetering and trying to figure out if I wanted to go back. I was always a very dedicated and hard worker. But now my hard work was focused on keeping this baby alive. I was trying to figure out how I could feel the most fulfilled. I wanted to be doing what I was most passionate about. I knew it was retail and fashion, so I wanted to continue being immersed in that world, while also having the flexibility of being with my son and not missing any milestones.

For a while, I did some consulting. I was helping a major corporation by revamping their whole retail strategy. I loved the freedom of consulting; the flexibility, being my boss, managing my schedule and being able to live in both worlds (motherhood and fashion). I would bring my son to my business meetings. My work was still getting done, so I kind of shifted the narrative. I felt like if I’m going to be giving you great ideas, and developing your strategy, I can also be rocking my son at the same time if he needs me.  Which made me think, not only could I be consulting more but I can take it a step further. My dream was always to have my clothing line, and that’s pretty much the reason why I got into buying and working for those corporate companies, to begin with.

[“source=forbes]

How This Instagram Influencer Is Building A Lifestyle Brand Through Beauty And Fashion

Shiva Safai, a model, entrepreneur and Instagram influencer, is influencing the way young girls and women view themselves through beauty and fashion. She’s taken her years of operating a criminal-background company and applied it to building her lifestyle brand. With the launch of her new jewelry collection in collaboration with Noush jewelry, Safai is building her empire one business at a time.

Shiva Safai

Shiva Safai, entrepreneur, on a photo shoot in Los Angeles, California.Aleksander Braun and Cameron West

“When thinking of the collection,” Safai stated. “I wanted to create pieces that are meaningful to myself, my culture and my followers in every detail. I want to show kids that anything you dream of you can achieve. You have to work hard and believe in yourself. There’s going to be people who won’t believe in you and who would want to destroy your dreams and your self-confidence. As long as you believe in yourself you can achieve anything you want.”

What started off as just a job, turned into the beginning of Safai’s entrepreneurial journey. Before the term ‘social media influencer’ emerged, she focused on the operation of her own company that conducted criminal-background checks. She quickly picked up on dealing with everything from traffic violations to felony charges and violations. “It never felt like work,” she shares. “I was intrigued by all the court cases and all the information I would get on a daily basis. One year turned into 10-years of running the company.”

She opened her first company with one of her cousins. Unfortunately, there was a falling out between the two of them. Through this experience, Safai strengthened her self-confidence and made a promise to herself to remain steadfast. “I was devastated,” she shares. “I wanted to give up and go back to Norway. I would call my mom every night. She kept saying, ‘you have worked so hard. You’ve done it once before and you can do it again. If you quit now, you’re going to let them win.’ My mom was there to talk me through it and give me the courage to restart the company again and I did. The second time I did it that was the successful one.”

Shiva Safai

Shiva Safai, lifestyle influencer, behind the scenes for her Jewelry Line shoot.Aleksander Braun and Cameron West

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Safai had a commute from Orange County to Los Angeles where her office was located. She would bring her sleeping bag with her and sleep in the office, sometimes two-to-three days a week. With a short staff, Safai had to work longer hours to ensure that her company thrived. “If people said that one day I would get into fashion and beauty,” she states, “I would say ‘there’s no way.’ I never saw myself in that world, although, I always loved fashion. After dissolving the partnership [of the second company], this fell into my lap. It was a completely different world.”

“It taught me,” Safai continues, “that working hard and believing in something will get you to your dream; you just don’t give up. It’s never easy, ever. It always takes hard work. There were days where I wanted to give up, and I thought I was failing but I wasn’t. In actuality, I was growing. There were a lot of errors I made but I learned from it, and I did it bigger and better as the years went by. I’ve learned that sometimes things don’t go the way you want but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Your work ethic is important. That is one thing that has stuck with me since opening up my first company. It disciplined me to put in the hard work. Only you can be responsible for your own success; no one else can do the job for you.”

Gradually, Safai began modeling. It wasn’t until she and her fiancé, real-estate mogul Mohamed Hadid, joined the cast of E! Network’s Second Wives Club that she entertained the idea of starting her own fashion beauty media brand. “This is the next chapter of my life,” Safai smiles. “Being on the show made me realize this was the next career I was going to get into; where I would focus my energy.”

Shiva Safai
[“source=forbes]

From YouTube Star To Obama Interviewer: Liza Koshy, 22, Is Creating A Digital Media Empire

She specializes in punnery, physical gags and parodies. One of her widely watched videos spoofs the makeup tutorials that have proliferated across YouTube. And she has several popular characters, like her male, mustachioed alter ego, Jet Packinski III. “He’s a very handsome man. I believe I’m better looking as a dude than a girl,” Koshy says.

In the last few years, the 22-year-old has become one of YouTube’s biggest stars, earned a spot on Forbes’ latest 30 Under 30 list—and made the leap to traditional media. “The worst advice I’ve ever received was ‘Don’t post on YouTube, it’s dying,’” says Koshy, who earned an estimated seven figures in 2017, thanks largely to her online output.

Read the complete 2019 Forbes 30 Under 30 package.

Like many other digital-native stars, the Houston-born Koshy got her start on (now-defunct) Vine. She began shooting six-second videos on her cellphone as a teen in 2013, just months after the app’s January launch. Her first clip featured her climbing on top of a car with friends. “It was just me, with my phone, in my car, dancing along, talking or making a really bad joke,” she recalls. “Which is why Vine died. Sorry about that.”

Her comedy—and her camera skills—developed, and soon she was using cutaway shots to create skits and sight gags, including tying her hair into flopping bunches and pretending to be a butterfly. They appealed to her young audience, which grew to 7 million followers on Vine alone. Soon she wanted to go beyond Vine’s short clips. “I eventually realized that I could talk for much longer than that.”

So she parlayed her popularity into a YouTube channel in July 2015, where she began posting weekly. She introduced herself as “Liza the little brown girl”—her mother is white, her father is Indian—and expanded her comedy and range of characters. In addition to Jet Packinski, there is Helga, a bespectacled, frazzled foreigner, and Carlos Q, an macho Hispanic man. Other popular series include “Driving with Liza” and “Grocery Shopping with Liza,” where she films herself on the go, interlaying errands with songs and silly faces. In a sign of her increasing stardom, she interviewed President Obama for a get-out-the-vote initiative in 2016. “You can’t legally show it on camera, but I actually voted on my absentee ballot [during the video],” she says.

Koshy’s mobile-first audience largely comprises members of Generation Z, people born between 1996 and 2010. According to Nielsen, 97% of Generation Z own a smartphone, and the cohort boasts a reported $44 billion in spending power. Hence Koshy’s appeal to advertisers, who have sponsored her content and hired her for ads, including a series for Beats by Dre headphones. The spots reportedly have four times the click-through rate—the percentage of people visiting the product online after seeing the ad—than other promotions starring celebrities like NFL quarterback Tom Brady.

Her business has expanded with her audience. In 2016, she branched out into a second YouTube channel of more one-off videos that don’t feature regular activities or characters. Popular uploads include reaction videos of her watching her own old, cringeworthy vines (19 million views) or of her reacting to teens watching her videos (17 million views); the subsidiary channel has an additional 7.3 million subscribers.

With an expanding YouTube presence, Koshy has caught the eye of traditional TV executives. In 2017, she became a host of MTV’s resurrected TRL, scored a role in Hulu’s drama Freakish and nabbed a part in Tyler Perry’s Boo! A Madea Halloween. This year, she was hired as the face of Nickelodeon’s Double Dare reboot.

“All of these different opportunities came from YouTube,” she explains. So Koshy is staying close to the source: In 2018 she created, produced and starred in her own YouTube Originals series, Liza on Demand, in which she works in the gig economy.

Next up: a Liza Koshy line of bags, out this fall. “You can’t play a high school student forever, so at some point I’m going to have to tear down that wall and tear off that wig and be me,” says Koshy.

[“source=forbes]

Former Facebook Manager Says The Company Has A ‘Black People Problem’

Bloomberg Royalty Free© 2018 Bloomberg Finance LP

Today, Mark S. Luckie, a former manager at Facebook, posted a memo about how Facebook treats its Black employees. In the memo, Luckie indicates that “Black people are finding that their attempts to create ‘safe spaces’ on Facebook…are being derailed by the platform itself.” Luckie explained claims of mistreatment in more detail throughout the memo mentioning that Black people’s content has been removed without notice. Luckie also mentioned that underrepresented groups have been excluded on both Instagram and Facebook, with less visibility and access given to them. He went on to also explain that increasing diversity does not solve the inclusion issue; diversity without inclusion is ineffective. Luckie also explained how microaggressions have created hostile work environments to many different Facebook employees he’s spoken to. When employees complain and report these issues to Human Resources (HR), they are made to feel as if the incidents are “a figment of [their] imagination.” Some Black employees may be hesitant to express their feelings about the mistreatment for fear of losing their job or retaliation. Despite the efforts Facebook has made to be more inclusive (employee resource groups, their diversity team), the company is unsuccessful at truly fostering a culture of inclusion for its Black employees.

How can the tech industry foster not only a more diverse environment but also a more inclusive environment that is more welcoming to Black people and other underrepresented groups?

    1. The first step in fostering a diverse and inclusive environment is conducting an audit of the current diversity climate within the organization. Enlist the opinions of employees, as well as customers, on how to improve different aspects of the organization. Luckie suggested implementing focus groups with people of color, which is an excellent suggestion. Focus groups can play a fundamental role in helping organizations assess how to make their products and services better. If multiple users are complaining about a specific issue (i.e. Black Facebook and Instagram user posts being removed and accounts being suspended), this should be addressed and dealt with.
    2. Luckie mentioned one solution is cultural competency training. An addition to this suggestion is that the training should be done on a frequent and ongoing basis. Research indicates that diversity training is successful when it is delivered over a significant period of time. Training can also impact the frequency of microaggressions, making the workplace a more inviting environment. Leaders should be required to participate in training, as well as each staff member in the organization.
    1. Diversity goes beyond just the numbers. The attraction of diverse talent is just one piece of the puzzle. The often more challenging aspect of diversity is figuring out how to foster a culture of inclusion for all. Are you allowing diverse talent to have a seat at the table? Assess team-building activities in the organization. Is everyone invited to the after-work events and parties? What is being done in the organization to foster interpersonal connections? Evaluate what is currently being done and figure out what could be done better.
    2. HR departments are often the first line of defense when employees feel that they’ve been mistreated. The HR department should have a clear plan for addressing these issues. Complaints made should be investigated and examined frequently. If there is a consistent or recurring claim being made, it should be dealt with. Luckie suggested creating “internal systems for employees to anonymously report microaggressions.” This can be an effective strategy. Employees may want to complain or report an incident but fear it will impact their job and status at the organization. Companies may benefit from integrating an anonymous system in which employees can report issues that occur, without fears of repercussions.

[“source=forbes]

10 Things You Can Buy If You Skip Having A Wedding

Photo by Annie Gray on UnsplashPhoto by Annie Gray on Unsplash

It may not sit well with mom or dad, but you don’t need to have a wedding to get married. There are a lot of reasons why couples prefer to elope or opt for a court ceremony — and money is definitely a factor.

The average wedding costs more than $33,000. So if the big party with your friends and family isn’t a priority, you may want to spend those funds elsewhere.

By skipping the traditional wedding, you could even drastically improve the life you live with your partner. From knocking out debt to checking adventures off your bucket list, here is a sample of some of the things you could do instead of the expensive I do’s.

1) Travel the world

For most travelers, spending a year traveling the world costs between $20,000 and $30,000. That means you could start your life as a married couple by exploring new destinations for a few months. While weddings are memorable, so are adventures in foreign lands. If you have a case of wanderlust, this may be the better choice for you.

2) Pay down debt

The average household with credit card debt owes nearly $17,000 and pays more than $1,200 in interest each year. And the average college graduate has more than $37,000 in student loan debt. Using a lump sum of cash to knock out some of your debts will not only lower your total debt burden, but will also lower your monthly fixed costs. Once that particular loan is paid in full, that’s one less monthly payment you have to worry about.

[“source=forbes]

Nintendo SwitchAccessories Nyko Is Releasing A Bunch Of Switch Accessories Before The End Of The Year

In addition to Nyko’s Dualies – a pair of Joy-Con alternatives due out next month – the third-party gaming accessory manufacturer has revealed it will be releasing a number of other products for the Nintendo Switch before the end of the year. The entire range can be pre-ordered from Nyko’s website and Amazon.

First up we have the Charge Base Plus – a charging dock for the Poké Ball Plus priced at $14.99. It’s powered by a Type-C USB cable and allows the ball to be charged when it’s not being used. It also comes with a carry case, providing increased protection when you’re in transit. Take a look below:

For the Super Smash Bros. Ultimate enthusiasts, Nyko will be offering two handy adapters for the Switch. The first is the four port Retro Controller Hub. As you can probably tell, this is based on the design of the official GameCube adapter and allows GameCube controllers to be used while playing the Switch. Much like the actual product, it connects to the system via USB. It will also set you back $14.99. The other product priced at $9.99 is the Retro Controller Adapter. This is a single-port adapter for one GameCube controller. Check out both of these items below:

Finally, to go alongside the Dualies, we have the Wireless Core Controller, which will be available in Clear, Red, Blue, Purple and Green for $29.99. It’s a relatively straightforward gamepad at an affordable price. Here’s a look at all of the different colours:

[“source=ndtv”]