From blue hair to garment bags: this week’s fashion trends

What’s hot and what’s not in fashion this week

Lady Gaga
 Blunette Lady Gaga. Photograph: Getty Images

Going up

Blunettes From Lady Gaga to Kylie Jenner, blue hair is everywhere.

Resentment Harness your negativity for a better life, says Sophie Hannah, author of How To Hold A Grudge.

Quinotto That’s quinoa risotto, of course.

Cultural altars Visionary fashion designer Grace Wales Bonner’s debut exhibition features an “assemblage of shrines” by notable artists, just opened at the Serpentine Gallery.

Grace Wales Bonner.
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 Shrine on: Grace Wales Bonner. Photograph: Alamy

Garment bags The new bumbags, according to Vogue. See Gucci, Alexander Wang and, er, your local dry cleaner.

Pizza wheel eyeliner Forget fiddly pens; rollers promise to fulfil all cat-eyed ambitions.

Going down

Olivia Pope There’s a new fixer in town. See Trinity Sommer in Dogs Of Berlin. A black patent mac and matching suitcase are the new white trouser suit.

Rhinoplasty Non-invasive “tweakments” are becoming more popular as cosmetic surgery fans opt for “lunch-break” procedures.

Gap yah string bracelets Bangles are back, according to Chrissy Teigen’s stylist, who recommends a layered approach.

H20 Waterless beauty is set to take over the skincare market this year, as manufacturers step away from the tap.

Pastels Wear neon green to boost your mood, à la Kendall Jenner. Sorry, coral.

[“source=theguardian”]

Fashion Friday: BART Edition

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Talia, a multimedia staffer, ventures into BART to find some of the latest fashion trends for this weeks episode of Fashion Friday.

[“source=ndtv”]

Fad Or Fixture: How Relevant Are CGI Models To The Fashion And Beauty Industries?

Balmain campaign

Balmain campaignBalmain

Lil Miquela has 1.5 million followers on Instagram. She’s 19-years-old, based in Los Angeles, a model and a musician.

The thing is, she’s also not real.

This computer-generated supermodel is the digital brainchild of an LA-based agency called Brud, which has recently received around $6 million in its latest funding round, led by Silicon Valley investors including Sequoia Capital.

That comes off the back of the fact that Lil Miquela, otherwise known as their resident “influencer”, make-believe though she is, is receiving real work.

Out front hiring her and various others that have been created, is the fashion industry, with brands from Balmain, Dior, Prada and Louis Vuitton having all jumped on the virtual avatar train.

Most recently, Lil Miquela featured in UGG’s 40th anniversary campaign, blending in seamlessly alongside two real-life influencers as though she were a natural part of the cast. For the unsuspecting onlooker, it’s not immediately clear she’s not.

The question is, do CGI models hold true value for such businesses, or is this just a fad? On the latest episode of the Innovators podcast by TheCurrent, I debate the topic with tech expert, Liz Bacelar

[“source=forbes]

The Moscow Seven: Meet Russia’s Future Fashion Stars

In times of strife and struggle, Russia has always placed its biggest trust in human resources. “We’re rich in minerals and minds,” goes an old saying. While the population of the world’s largest (by territory) nation has steadily declined since independence in 1991, recent years have marked a potential reversal of fortunes with ‎0.05% growth recorded in 2017. The government aims to prevent the dreaded brain drain, but it’s the creative industries that often are the most flexible to adapt to new challenges.

One of Russia’s leading fashion designers Igor Gulyaev closed MBFW Russia with a blockbuster show inclusive of his Insta-famous cat!Courtesy of MBFW Russia

Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Russia just took place in Moscow in October 13-17. Its Fashion Futurum program is an example of successful strategic support for emergent talent within a specific economic sector. Last year, the organizing committee co-launched FashionNet as part of the National Technology Initiative to boost domestic apparel market coverage up to 70% by 2035. While all eyes were on the fashion capital’s brightest stars Yasya Minochkina, Pirosmani, Artem Shumov, Alena Akhmadullina and Igor Gulyaev, we decided to spend time with the participants of the Fashion Futurum Accelerator, a program that helps promising designers set up a business from scratch. These future stars spend the past couple months in an intense mentorship program in Moscow working alongside established brand managers, buyers, investors and consultants to perfect their vision and set up sustainable production and retail channels. In between the shows, I asked them what participation in the Accelerator meant for them as they prepared to develop and present their full debut collections next season as part of the platform.

[“source=forbes]

How Technology Could Revolutionize Online Shopping In The Near Future

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How often are you satisfied with the size and fit of your online purchases? In the past few years, return rates for clothing purchased online have reached close to 40%. In a poll reported on by BBC, 56% of respondents who purchased clothing online six months prior to May 2016 said they had returned at least one item. Apparel Magazine reports that 70% of all online clothing returns are caused by problems with fit.

In the U.S., online apparel sales accounted for more than 25% of overall apparel sales in 2017. But why do people shop online even though they have to return clothing that does not fit? How many more people would shop online if they could be certain about fit and size?

As retailers play with free delivery and free returns even if it hurts their business, the cost of returns continues to grow along with the rate of returns. Currently, each order sent back costs retailers from $3 to $12.

The number of returned goods also has a negative impact on the environment. The destruction of unsold and returned garments, especially in the luxury sector, has caused people to ask questions. The fashion industry is known as one of the largest polluters in the world.

Based on my research into the struggles of today’s retailers and what I’ve learned founding a company that develops 3D body modeling technology, I believe that solving fit problems could result in growth in the number of online shoppers, reduced returns and less waste. Thankfully, I’ve been observing innovations coming out of the technology sector that could help make significant progress in solving this industrywide issue.

[“source=forbes]

Urban Fashion Spurs Levi’s Upcoming IPO

Kris Kross during 1993 Kid’s Choice Awards in Los Angeles, California, United States. (Photo by Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic, Inc)Getty

Levi’s is considering returning to the stock market more than 30 years after it went private. The company is reportedly planning and IPO that values it at up to $5 billion sources told CNBC, despite many stores closing that sell Levi’s brands. As culture changes and sub-cultures spring up, is now the right time for Levi’s to become a publicly traded company once again?

Hip-hop’s love affair with jeans is as diverse and varied as the genre itself.  Straight legged denim, like Levi’s classic 501 or 505 jeans, kept your favorite old school rappers looking fresh back in the ’80s . While current lyricists look to a more tailored approach from Levi’s, like its skinny jeans to keep their wardrobe fresh.

CultureBanx noted the denim maker has been around the block a time or two, they first went public in 1971, before family members took it back private in 1984 through a leveraged buyout. Levi’s is looking to raise between $600 million and $800 million for its new IPO and investors seem to think that’s a fair price. Since Levi’s bonds are publicly traded, which means it has to report quarterly earnings to the SEC, during the first nine months of the year revenue has gone up 16%. Net income jumped 44%, mainly due to demand for its jeans at both retail stores and online.

Long before today’s slim cuts or the baggy jeans of the 90s, Run DMC and Big Daddy Kane were rocking straight-legged jeans. In 2013, Jermaine Dupri paid homage to the memory of Kriss Kross member Mac Daddy by wearing his Levi’s backwards to the funeral, a style popularized by the group. Present day rappers have moved beyond just sporting the company’s jeans and are mixing Levi’s Trucker Jackets with other brands, as a way of taking a menswear staple and re-contextualizing it.

[“source=forbes]