Date dressing: how fashion in the age of MeToo redefined sex appeal

Designs by Victoria Beckham, Christopher Kane and Stella McCartney.

‘Skirts that swish the ankle and sleeves that graze the fingertips’: designs by Victoria Beckham, Christopher Kane and Stella McCartney.

Let’s talk about sex, shall we? Fashion and sex, that is. First things first: any conversation about sex needs to be an honest one, so let’s cut straight to the chase. Sex appeal will always be an integral part of fashion, even if sexy has become a less straightforward compliment after MeToo. So please, there’s no point pretending that we are too woke to care about looking hot these days. We still care. Nobody is taking vows of sartorial chastity here. But perhaps we are making some progress in how we think about sex and fashion if we are more conscious of whose rules are being played by, and whose needs are being met. As long as the survival of the human race depends on sex, looking attractive isn’t going out of fashion. But there is room for evolution.

It is Valentine’s weekend, and dressing for date night is the hot spot where the rules of attraction meet the rules of social convention. Which means that some Valentine looks might just be a little different this year, in the MeToo afterglow. The neckline might be altered, or the skirt might be a new length. Or maybe the clothes are the same but you might wear different underwear or decide against the high court shoes with toe cleavage, and look – and feel – different as a result. The way we dress for date night through the years reveals so much about our changing attitudes to sex. Braless under a silk blouse in the midst of the sexual emancipation of the early 70s. Spike-heeled and armoured in sequins in the competitively charged, battle-of-the-boardroom 80s. Unravelled and lipstick-smudged in the fog of 90s grunge when a Saturday night was more about getting high than getting laid.

A Gucci model at Paris fashion week … dressed in a way that might work for a portrait sitting with Leonardo da Vinci rather than Helmut Newton.
FacebookTwitterPinterest
A Gucci model at Paris fashion week … dressed in a way that might work for a portrait sitting with Leonardo da Vinci rather than Helmut Newton. Photograph: Victor VIRGILE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

It is 18 months – three seasons, in fashion terms – since the MeToo movement was born. In that time, fashion’s centre of gravity has shifted away from sex. Hemlines are longer, silhouettes are looser. From London to Milan to Paris to New York, on glitzy spotlit runways polished to a mirror shine and on catwalks marked out with tape on concrete floors, a new course is being set. From Stella McCartney to Erdem, Coach to Loewe, Dior to Max Mara, there are skirts that swish the ankle and sleeves that graze the fingertips. Fashion has shifted the emphasis from skin to fabric. As a sweeping generalisation, there are more sweeping hemlines. Gucci, the runaway fashion success story of this decade, peoples its catwalks and advertising campaigns with women who would appear to be dressed in a way that might work for a portrait sitting with Leonardo da Vinci rather than for one with Helmut Newton.

Roland Mouret, a fashion icon for two decades, has recently gravitated away from the siren curves of his Galaxy dress, revisiting the pleats and cascades he learned while working with Yohji Yamamoto and Issey Miyake in his 20s. At his spring/summer 19 show, models wore badges in support of the MeToo movement and catwalked on the roof of the National Theatre to the sound of Aretha Franklin singing Natural Woman. Mouret said at the time that the new silhouette felt like a redefinition of his relationship with the female body. In the second half of her decade in fashion, Victoria Beckham, too, has pivoted firmly away from fitted dresses and toward loose, fluid separates. Such silhouettes – once the hallmark of alternative, arthouse fashion – have become mainstream. Vanessa Spence, design director at Asos, confirms the shift is happening on the high street. “The midi length has become a staple in our fashion vocabulary. Necklines still vary, but we have recently seen more of a focus on the back as an exposed area.” Sexy, she says, is no longer a concept that takes up more bandwidth in womenswear than men’s. “It’s the same across the sexes – which is surely a good thing.”

‘The emphasis has switched from skin to fabric’ … model Kaia Gerber at the Max Mara show during Milan fashion week spring/summer 2019.
FacebookTwitterPinterest
‘The emphasis has switched from skin to fabric’ … model Kaia Gerber at the Max Mara show during Milan fashion week spring/summer 2019. Photograph: Jacopo Raule/Getty Images

There will always be cross-pollination between sex and fashion, but MeToo has prompted a conversation about healthy boundaries around nudity and exposure. Changing facilities backstage at fashion shows are one issue being brought into the spotlight. It was long considered perfectly normal for an assortment of well-wishers, journalists, celebrities, friends of the designer – most, of course, with a camera phone in their pocket – to crowd immediately after a show into the open-plan backstage area where models were scrambling out of their show looks and into their own clothes. A year ago, New York fashion week was the first to address this, pledging “a safe and respectful working environment” with private changing areas. During London fashion week last September, the British model Edie Campbell spoke to Radio 4 about the ongoing lack of privacy at some London shows, describing it as “bizarre, uncomfortable and humiliating”. Awareness is growing that an expectation of endless female nudity is not a healthy baseline for any industry.

The meteoric impact of MeToo on what it means to dress up and look your best became clear a year ago, when the Golden Globes was the first red carpet to turn black. It was a gesture of female solidarity from Hollywood’s women, in an industry reeling in the Weinstein fallout. A black dress for black tie is hardly revolutionary, yet the dresses became the story of the night. The winners’ list is now a distant memory, but the red carpet blackout remains a landmark moment. The world was reminded of the power of an outfit – even one that stays within the guardrails of convention – to send a powerful message. Natalie Portman, Elisabeth Moss, Meryl Streep, Angelina Jolie, Penélope Cruz and Salma Hayek wore long black gowns with long sleeves. In each case, the dress had a decorative element that lightened the mood – a sheer layer, a split in the skirt or a portrait neckline. Many actresses left husbands and boyfriends at home to pair up with female activists for the night, which threw into sharp relief the traditional award show optics that see an actress nominated for an Oscar totter in a tiny, pastel-toned frock on the arm of a man in a suit, as if she were a magician’s assistant about to be put in a box and sawn in half.

At the Golden Globes women wore black as a gesture of solidarity and in support of anti-harrassment campaigns.
FacebookTwitterPinterest
At the 2017 Golden Globes women wore black as a gesture of solidarity and in support of anti-harrassment campaigns. Photograph: Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

But if the first half of 2018 belonged to a swelling tide of demure black-tie dressing, the second half was dominated by an angry backlash against catwalk near-nudity. The exit of Phoebe Philo from Céline after 10 years had been felt as a body blow by women who had held dear her philosophy that catwalk fashion could be an elevated woman-friendly wardrobe rather than date-bait. It was with unfortunate timing that her successor, Hedi Slimane, unveiled a debut dominated by doll-sized party dresses – one that seemed the polar opposite of what the house had stood for under Philo – on the very day of the Brett Kavanaugh sexual misconduct hearings in Washington last September. Emotions were running high, and Slimane’s dolly-drop aesthetic became a lightning rod for female fury.

Male designers mansplaining female sexuality to the women who buy their clothes is not new. But the context has changed, and in fashion, context is all. Engagement with the world is what makes fashion more than simply clothes. It is, quite literally, what makes it fashion. Two months after Slimane’s show, the Victoria’s Secret models came bounding down their runway, with the tried-and-tested formula of bouncy breasts and jutting hipbones, angel wings and skimpy boudoir lace knickers which made this the most popular fashion show in the world just a few years ago. This time the spectacle was met with critical scorn (website Vox ran a feature with the headline The Stubborn Irrelevance Of The Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show), falling ratings and – most tellingly – declining sales.

A model at the Christopher Kane show, London fashion week, 2018 – the collection was adorned with drawings and quotes from the seminal 70s manual The Joy Of Sex.
FacebookTwitterPinterest
A model at the Christopher Kane show, London fashion week, 2018 – the collection was adorned with drawings and quotes from the 70s manual The Joy Of Sex. Photograph: Victor VIRGILE/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

London fashion week has never been afraid of controversy. While other cities have reacted to the new climate by shying away from the idea of sex altogether, designers Christopher Kane and Michael Halpern are among those tackling the new rules of sexy dressing head-on, and reaching for a new body-positive, female-first way to talk about sex on the catwalk.

A frank curiosity about sex has always been part of Kane’s aesthetic – his spring 2014 season featured sweaters embroidered with illustrations of the reproductive organs of flowers – and in February last year, he waded into the MeToo debate with a collection adorned with drawings and quotes from the seminal 70s manual The Joy Of Sex. Six months later, he was back with a spring 2019 collection soundtracked by a David Attenborough narration about sexual behaviour in animals and Marilyn Monroe talking about how society defined her as a sex object and then despised her because of it. “There are no taboos in my studio,” Kane said after that show. “To be bluntly honest,” he told Vogue at the time, “we wear clothes to attract members of the opposite sex and of our own sex. That’s what fashion is.” Meanwhile Halpern, who burst on to the fashion scene in 2017 with sequin dresses so minuscule they might have turned heads at Studio 54, says he relies “super heavily” on the opinions of his mum and sister, “who are both feminists – of course. My focus is on being aware and awake to what women want.”

Penny Martin was almost a decade ahead of this shift when she launched The Gentlewoman magazine back in 2010. “It was the zenith of the weeklies, when the newsstand was crammed with reality TV celebrities with barely any clothes and shouty coverlines,” she recalls. “Our mission was to be the opposite of that – to give both the cover stars and the readers back their dignity.” The Gentlewoman came to be aligned with a particular kind of woman-friendly fashion, epitomised by what Phoebe Philo was doing at Céline. “Women want clothes that give them pleasure, without undermining them,” Martin says. “And I wouldn’t be in this business if I didn’t think providing women with the tools they deserve to get respect in both their working and private lives wasn’t a worthwhile ambition.”

Although certain sections of the media would love to frame this debate as a catfight, there is little appetite in the fashion industry for slut-shaming of women who choose to wear tiny, revealing dresses. (To paraphrase Voltaire: I may not like what you wear, but I will defend to the death your right to wear it.) What we wear for date night is part and parcel of sexual politics, but surely there is room for making the point that a woman’s erotic impact is not all that she is, without policing anyone’s wardrobe. “My take on it, as editor of Elle,” says Anne-Marie Curtis, “is that a modern woman wants the freedom to look sexy when she wants to. But that fashion can’t be about having to wear a pencil skirt to get a promotion, or having to wear a low-cut dress to make your boyfriend happy.

A model on the catwalk in the Halpern show, London Fashion Week 2018.
FacebookTwitterPinterest
Michael Halpern tackled the new rules of sexy head on in his London fashion week show. Photograph: WWD/REX/Shutterstock

Every single image that goes into Elle goes through our modern, feminist lens. If I am looking at a shoot and there’s a pose that I feel makes the model look vulnerable, I won’t run that picture. We just did an edit of a shoot and there were images that I took out, because I always want the woman to look like she is owning the image.”

But unlike a longer hemline, fashion’s stronger attitude cannot be measured in inches or plotted on a graph. “It comes down to intention,” Halpern says. “What makes my friends and the women in my family feel empowered is self-worth, self-definition. It’s about not letting someone else put you in a box.”

For generations, teenage girls’ teachers have used the does-it-touch-the-floor-when-you-kneel test to establish the minxiness of a skirt. But calibrations of sex appeal are more complex. A pose in which a model is lying on a sofa can project laid-back confidence or exposed vulnerability, and the overall effect depends not only on the clothes but on the lighting, the facial expression. The same minidress can be framed as a celebratory portrait of raw female power, or an exploitative image of a woman underdressed and undefended. The highly visually literate modern fashion consumer is attuned to such subtleties, which is precisely why the dog-whistle crassness of Victoria’s Secret feels so out of step with our times. “The readers of women’s magazines, and of fashion photographs, are so literate,” Martin says. “An infinitesimal degree of ‘wrong’ can be vast in this context, instantly breaking the spell.”

Sex as something unspoken, as a scent caught on the air, is part of fashion’s magic spell. When the zeitgeist is embracing a new era of informed consent, the sheer-black-stocking vibe of fashion’s traditional date-night mode can feel like an uncomfortable hangover from another era. A new dress may not change the world. But it could make date night a triumph. The rules are up to you.

[“source=theguardian”]

 

Madea’s Top 5 Fashion Rules for 2019

Branded: A Madea Family Funeral (Embargoed)

Fact: Defining your personal sense of style is tricky. That’s precisely why it’s so important to have fashion role models to look to for inspiration.

Enter the impossible-to-ignore: Mabel “Madea” Simmons, who we were lucky enough to catch up with after her runway debut. “My style is a mix of vintage and modern chic. Ya girl is always dressed to impress, and wearing something that still allows me to drop it like it’s hot,” shares the star. We’re not saying you have to carbon copy her exact look, but you can (and should) take notes.

So go on, take what you will and make it your own. And when in doubt remember that fashion is supposed to be fun, honey!Branded: A Madea Family Funeral (Embargoed)

Rule 1: Comfort Is Key
Fashion is about looking good, but if you can’t move around your day comfortably, there’s no point. Luckily, Madea agrees. “If Madea loves one thing honey you know it’s a muumuu. Yard work, church, the CLUB—I’m gonna be well-ventilated.”

Rule 2: Invest in a Power Suit
“When Madea walks into a room, you know I’ve arrived.” That’s the kind of vibe you’re going for, and you’re not going to make it happen without a power suit in your wardrobe. “For all my dressy and special occasion needs, I look no further than my fabulousness skirt suit. This baby was made for me and all my curves, y’all.”

Branded: A Madea Family Funeral (Embargoed)
Rule 3: Have a Signature Jewelry Piece
“Haven’t ya heard? A lady never leaves home without her pearls! Y’all already know I’m as classy as it gets, but these shiny beads add an effortless elegance to my everyday and special occasion looks—and my family has tons of those, so these ensure Madea always comes prepared.” OK, so it may not be pearls for you, but it’s really to your benefit to nail down a signature jewelry look that’ll elevate your image.

Branded: A Madea Family Funeral (Embargoed)
Rule 4: Patterns Are Your Friend
This season, leave your boring neutrals at home. Owning your fashion identity is all about pushing boundaries with fun prints and patterns. “Who is Madea without her floral muumuus? My dresses are loud, they please the crowd and they’ve all got it going on. I dress to please the Lord, y’all.”

Branded: A Madea Family Funeral (Embargoed)

Rule 5: Try New Trends
Figuring out your signature style is a wonderful feeling, but it can also become stale if you don’t mix it up and rotate in some new trends here and there. Need a recommendation? “I see all these women turning up the heat and working them puff-sleeve dresses into their wardrobe. It’s about damn time they caught up to Madea Mabel Simmons!”

[“source=eonline”]

The founders of Aje talk opening MBFWA, connecting through fashion and the future of their label

Everything you need to know ahead of MBFWA.

Edwina Forest and Adrian Norris, the co-founders of Australian fashion label Aje, have undeniably cemented their brand as one to watch. Worn by the likes of Alessandra Ambrosio, Shay Mitchell and Isabel Lucas, Aje has become a go-to for universally flattering and feminine silhouettes that transcend seasonal fads and fleeting trends.

As such, it comes as no surprise that Aje has been selected to open Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Australia 2019 with the presentation of its resort 2020 collection. Following in the footsteps of fellow ‘Mercedes Benz Presents’ designers Camilla & Marc (2018), Dion Lee (2017) and Toni Maticevski (2016), the label will kick off the week-long festivities on May 12 at a yet-to-be-disclosed location.

Proud to be embarking on the label’s second decade by headlining Australian fashion week, Norris said that the honour is “a statement of recognition for our brand, but also for our loyal clients, many of whom have been with us for 11 years, and who continue to grow along this journey with us.”

“We always seek to offer them something truly unique,” he added. “And we look forward to making this a milestone moment with them in mind.”

Speaking with Vogue, Forest teased the highly-anticipated resort collection, explaining that the label will continue to “further acknowledge and celebrate the duality inside us all and to salute the diversity and contrast within this extraordinary land we call home.”

“With this opportunity we want to really connect with hearts and tell our story in the most powerful way yet,” said Norris, who went on to reveal that the collection was in part inspired by the rawness of the Australian coastline.

When quizzed on where the future of the label lies, the co-founders and creatives shared that they intend for 2019 to be somewhat of a turning point for Aje, with the brand looking to make a concerted effort to “reach out and touch the hearts of like-minded women, at home and around the world.”

Crediting their success to their considered and strategic approach, together with their ability to never look back, it’s easy to see how Aje has managed to reach the milestone that is opening MBFWA in just 11 short years.

 

[“source=vogue”]

 

These 1.3 billion people could test brands’ addiction to fast fashion

Image result for These 1.3 billion people could test brands’ addiction to fast fashionStarting a decade ago, in my early twenties, I spent several months every year in India doing fieldwork for my PhD. As I visited various parts of the country, I observed a distinct shift in the clothing shops that lined the streets in larger cities. Next to stores that sold Indian outfits–such as brightly colored saris, tunics, and a traditional pantsuit called a salwar kameez–you could find American and European brands, like Levi’s and H&M. Many women mixed Indian and Western styles, wearing colorful cotton tunics with jeans, for instance.

Western fashion brands–from Tommy Hilfiger to Nike to Zara–have recognized the enormous opportunity the Indian market opens up, and have been rushing in to woo Indian consumers. India’s economy is expected to grow 8% a year until 2022, and the Indian middle class is expected to expand at 19.4% a year over the same period, outpacing China, Mexico, and Brazil. According to a report by Business of Fashion and Deloitte, India’s fashion market will be worth $59.3 billion by 2022, making it the sixth largest in the world, on par with the U.K. and Germany.

India’s meteoric growth is dovetailing with a growing awareness of how the apparel industry’s pollution–from plastic waste to carbon emissions–is reaching a breaking point, both in the country and globally. A Nielsen study from eight years ago showed that Indian consumers were already becoming more conscious of environmentally friendly fashion practices, and this awareness is only growing. Groups like the Worker Diaries, which advocates for the welfare of workers in the region, and Fashion Revolution India, which pushes for sustainable and ethical practices in fashion, are helping make ethical and sustainable issues more visible. “India has a huge influence on how our fashion is made globally. We are also a huge consumer market,” Fashion Revolution India writes on its website. It encourages Indian consumers to ask fashion companies to explain where their clothes come from through social media–and reports it has received responses from over 1,000 brands so far.

And even as America pulls out of the Paris Climate Agreement, India has doubled down on its commitment to joining the other nations of the world in cutting carbon emissions. India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi said it would be a “morally criminal act” for the world not to confront the looming threat of climate change. India is the third highest polluter in the world after China and the United States but is committed to absorbing 2.5 billion to 3 billion tons of CO2 through planting trees, achieving 40% renewable energy by 2030, and reducing the intensity of greenhouse gas emissions based on its GDP by a third below its 2005 levels. According to a recent United Nations report, India is on track to meet the first two of these goals ahead of this deadline, reflecting the government’s dedication to averting a climate disaster.

It’s important to note that on a per capita basis, India is still only the 128th in terms of emissions, and 300 million Indians don’t have access to electricity. As its economy grows, more people will move into the middle class and have access to goods that contribute to the world’s pollution, including fashion. As the number of consumers grows, it’s arguably a critical time to introduce eco-friendly products.

As fashion’s biggest European and American brands enter the Indian market, selling sustainability is not just the ethical thing to do–it also makes good business sense. This is part of the reason that global giants are pitching themselves to Indians as eco-friendly brands. At the same time, as they rapidly expand, it’s become clear that to truly tackle the looming threat of climate change (to which the fashion industry contributes mightily), brands need to rethink not only what they are selling customers, but also how much.

[Photo: Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg/Getty Images]

WHAT BIG BRANDS ARE DOING NOW

The American denim brand Levi’s was one of the earliest American fashion labels to enter the Indian market in 1995. The brand has been working to lower its environmental footprint globally, by reducing carbon emissions and using lasers to finish jeans instead of chemicals. Sanjeev Mohanty, Levi’s managing director for South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, says that Indian consumers are aware of the importance of such sustainable practices and are more likely to shop from brands that make clothes ethically.

“As far back as 2011 (when the Nielsen study was conducted), the Indian consumer was already more interested in energy efficiency in manufacturing, and related practices such as the use of recyclable packaging,” he tells me over email. In its stores Levi’s broadcasts messaging about its sustainability goals, like its plan to reduce carbon emissions across its offices, retail stores, and distribution network by 40% and use 100% renewable sources in its own facilities by 2025, or its new technique for finishing jeans that requires less water–which it made it open source, in the hopes of saving 50 billion liters of water by 2020. Those goals show up in Levi’s products, too: All Levi’s and Docker’s products have a tag that says “Wash less, wash in cold, line dry, and donate when no longer needed.”

H&M, a Swedish brand, is a far newer player in the Indian market. In 2015, it opened its first store in New Delhi, but now has more than 40 stores throughout India. It’s not only in big cities, where wealthier, more globalized consumers live. It is also in smaller cities, and targets lower-middle class Indians by offering clothes at prices that are affordable to them.

H&M is working to introduce the concept of fast fashion in India–but it’s making the case that inexpensive, on-trend clothes can be made ethically and sustainably. The company says it is working to use entirely recycled or sustainably sourced materials by 2030, and totally offset its carbon footprint by 2040. Part of this approach is to respond to customer demand and sell more products to eco-conscious Indians.

For instance, India is one of the largest producers of cotton in the world, and many Indian consumers will be familiar with the horrific stories of entire villages in the Indian countryside being poisoned by the chemicals used in the cotton-growing process. By 2020, H&M aims to source all its cotton sustainably–which it defines as using organic cotton, recycled cotton, or cotton certified by the Better Cotton Initiative, which helps farmers grow cotton in a way that reduces environmental stress.

Like Levi’s, H&M uses its tags to stress its efforts. “When Indian consumers see green tags on garments (which explain how eco-friendly they are), they are starting to understand what this means, and thinking, ‘Oh this could be good for me,’” says Elin Astrom, H&M India’s sustainability manager. “Talk about sustainability and circular fashion has gained a lot more attention here over the past few years.”

The science of fabric recycling is still in its infancy. Organizations–including the H&M Foundation–are working to develop technologies that will be able to separate the many fibers that are used in fabric blends. But H&M is already working to collect clothes from customers, which are either given to people who will use them or taken apart to be recycled. In 2017, the company collected 17,771 tons of textiles. It has recycling bins set up at all 40 Indian stores, and Dhatri Bhatt, H&M India’s head of communications, says they have been popular with customers. “We’ve been pretty encouraged by this response,” she says. “Customers across the country have been bringing their old garments to recycle them.”

[Photo: Pradeep Gaur/Mint/Getty Images]

BIG PROBLEMS NEED RADICAL SOLUTIONS

Yet the industry’s fatal flaw is that it is built on a business model of selling more and more clothes to customers faster and faster. According to data from the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, which helps companies and governments transition to a circular economy, the number of times an article of clothing is worn before it gets chucked out has declined by 36% since 2000, with many consumers discarding garments after just seven to ten wears. And in that same period, the number of units of clothes sold annually has doubled from 50 billion units to 100 billion units. “The reason we see so much waste happening is because we’re producing more and more, and wearing the clothes less and less,” says Francois Souchet, a project manager at the Foundation.

Rather than selling more clothes that are marginally more sustainably made, a truly earth-changing solution would be to encourage consumers to buy fewer, more durable products. This may seem radical, but we’ve seen it work for brands like Patagonia, which mends customer’s well-worn garments to extend their life, and Eileen Fisher, which eschews fashion trends to encourage customers to wear the same outfits season after season. While these brands haven’t grown as fast as their more popular fast fashion counterparts, they are both successful, profitable businesses. A more radical approach to sustainability, both in India, and around the world, is for fashion brands to make durable products in classic styles.

As they expand into India, global giants have a chance to rewrite the book on fast fashion. What would happen if these brands sold Indian middle class consumers a fundamentally different vision of fashion than the one they’ve sold elsewhere in the world? What if instead of idealizing newness, they instead focused on quality, durability, and classic looks that never go out of style? That would be a much more effective approach to sustainability than a simple recycling bin.

[“source=fastcompany”]

From jarfing to jellyfish, our fashion terms guide will help you to chat with the style pack

THE mullet isn’t just that much-ridiculed eighties hairstyle, it’s a fashion term. And it seems that with every new fashion season, there’s a new bit of fashion jargon.

Frankly, it’s a language minefield out on the catwalks, as bizarre designs compete with bizarre descriptions . . . but don’t despair. You can keep yourself headed firmly fashion-forward with our round up of keywords so you can talk fash with a pash.

MULLET – Gemma Chan

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” An asymmetric hemline that’s higher at the front, lower at the back” data-credit=”Goff Photos” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?strip=all&w=691″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204400.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

GOFF PHOTOS
An asymmetric hemline that’s higher at the front, lower at the back

JARFING – Alexa Chung

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Wearing a jumper as a scarf helps you cope with the cold without being overburdened” data-credit=”Splash News” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?strip=all&w=585″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204452.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

SPLASH NEWS
Wearing a jumper as a scarf helps you cope with the cold without being overburdened

ONIONING – Blake Lively

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Layering up on cold days – it’s both stylish and comfortable” data-credit=”Splash News” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?strip=all&w=720″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204441.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

SPLASH NEWS
Layering up on cold days – it’s both stylish and comfortable

SHROBING – Jennifer Lopez

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Placing your coat or jacket on your shoulders and leaving the arms to swing” data-credit=”Goff Photos” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?strip=all&w=639″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT0004652044011.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

GOFF PHOTOS
Placing your coat or jacket on your shoulders and leaving the arms to swing

LAMPSHADING – Jada Pinkett Smith

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Creating a slender silhouette with a broad hemline sitting above over-the-knee boots” data-credit=”Splash News” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?strip=all&w=640″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204421.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

SPLASH NEWS
Creating a slender silhouette with a broad hemline sitting above over-the-knee boots

JELLYFISH – Victoria Beckham

<img class="lazyautosizes lazyloaded" src="data:;base64,” sizes=”620px” srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 3024w” alt=” Using voluminous pieces on the top and streamlined below, to appear slimmer” data-credit=”Splash News” data-sizes=”auto” data-img=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?strip=all&w=642″ data-srcset=”https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 180w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 360w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 540w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 720w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 900w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1080w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1296w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1512w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1728w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 1944w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2160w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2376w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2592w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 2808w, https://www.thesun.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/NINTCHDBPICT000465204410.jpg?w=960 3024w” />

SPLASH NEWS
Using voluminous pieces on the top and streamlined below, to appear slimmer

[“source=thesun.co.uk”]

We hate being called a value player: Shital Mehta, CEO, Max Fashion India

Shital Mehta, CEO, Max Fashion India

Apart from working towards a bullish revenue target, Max Fashion India hopes to shed its long-standing ‘value for money’ image and be known instead as a ‘fashion destination’. Shital Mehta, the company’s CEO, speaks to Shinmin Bali about Max’s expansion plans, its omnichannel strategy and the insignificance of ‘end of season sales’. Edited excerpts:

What are the growth and expansion plans of Max?
This year, we are likely to clock Rs 3,600 crore in revenue. We are not a retailer or aggregator store alone. We are a fashion brand present across every possible segment, whether it is value or premium, Indian or western wear, men or women.

We would continue to penetrate even the micro markets of the top 10 cities, because we are very strong there. Given our positioning, we can go further into the smaller catchment areas in cities like Bengaluru or Hyderabad. For example, in Bengaluru, we have 27 stores, and we could add another five to 10 stores in the next two to three years. We are also keen on expanding in the East, North, West and Central India, where we have not fully exploited the market potential. Half of our business comes from the South.

How does Max differentiate itself among other players?
Max is the only brand in India that operates on an eight-season calendar, that is, almost 45 days per season. We turn our stock so rapidly that, in around six weeks, our store collection changes completely. We are aiming to create more than 20,000 new designs per year. Currently, no other brand in the Indian market, domestic or international, goes beyond 10,000 designs per year. Ours is a heady cocktail of variety, freshness and trend sensibilities — that we bring in from our experience in international markets — accessibility and, finally, affordable pricing. That is the combination to create value fashion. Just because others sell at affordable prices, doesn’t mean they stand for ‘value fashion’; it only means they are playing a pricing game.

READ ALSO | Now, get your electricity bill on WhatsApp; BSES launches new service for customers in Delhi

How important is the digital ecosystem for Max?
We do not sell on any of the marketplaces, but have built our own site and app. At the moment, the app has four million downloads. It was launched 14 months ago. Our online model is currently growing at 60%. Like a lot of large global players, we have gone omnichannel as well, with services like Click and Collect. The Dubai market has one of our very tech-savvy stores, which has a Magic Mirror, QR-code-enabled shopping, etc. We plan to bring that to India.
There is a lot of focus on making sure we are more of an ‘anytime, anywhere’ brand. Families are our core consumers, but we have put in effort in the last two years towards connecting with the millennials. They want the latest fashion made available in the most accessible manner. In serving them, we are a value fashion brand with a fast fashion mindset.

But wouldn’t that be reinforcing the ‘value’ image? 
We hate being called a value player. Our past was only about ‘value’. Max is for consumers who seek value, but are fashion forward. In the time to come, you will see a lot of focus on strategic brand communication and establishing Max as a brand which has a certain stature. We also want to strengthen our brand communication.

What about your omnichannel strategy? How is it faring?
Around 15% of all our online orders are through Click and Collect. Likewise, we are seeing 10-15% of Return to Store happening. What we are also pushing for is online shopping from within the store — endless aisles — where one purchases within the store and it’s delivered to you. Click and Collect and Return to Store have been rolled out across India. Endless aisles has been rolled out in five stores in Bengaluru and will be extended to other cities soon.

How important are sale periods for Max?
Max is, perhaps, the only player for which end of season sales (EOSS) are almost insignificant. Almost 75% of what we sell is sold on full price. We do not mark up and then bring the price down or hand out vouchers. For us, EOSS is a ritual. Our dream is to not have EOSS at Max at all.

 

[“source=financialexpress”]