NYFW: A Celebration of Oscar-Nominated Costume Designer Ruth E. Carter

The one-night-only installation showcased the cultural relevancy of Carter’s work today in themed vignettes such as “Women In Protest” and “The Hero.”

Ruth E. Carter looked around the fifth-floor space at New York’s Spring Studios, where roughly 30 costumes from her 30-year career were arranged in a half-dozen vignettes, and she couldn’t help but appreciate the full-circle moment. “I beat these streets for years, looking for costumes, creating costumes for Spike Lee, riding the subways of New York as a stylist, as a costume designer,” Carter said. “I did everything in this city, so coming back here with my clothes and my exhibition is a really proud moment for me and is all about coming home to the city that I love.”

Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for IMG

Carter is currently enjoying high-wattage attention largely due to her Oscar-nominated designs for 2018’s Black Panther – a “Heroes and Sheroes” exhibition featuring her work has been touring the U.S. since that film premiered last February (pieces are included in the 27th annual “Art of Motion Picture Costume Design” exhibition at  L.A.’s Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising through April 12). Wednesday night’s event, which doubled as a kick-off party for fall 2019 New York Fashion Week, highlighted the marriage of film and fashion woven through the thread of Carter’s designs.

“Every time you go to a fashion photo shoot, you’ll find inspiration images on the wall, and many times they come from film,” noted Ivan Bart, president of IMG Fashion. “When I first met with Ruth [in November], I told her, ‘You have to understand, you’re inspiring a whole new generation of fashion designers.’ I wanted to create an event that showcased that combination of inspiration and aspiration, and how that extends to interpretation.”

Anna Webber/Getty Images for IMG
CEO and founder of Harlem’s Fashion Row Brandice N. Daniel, honoree Ruth E. Carter and president of IMG Models and IMG Fashion Properties Ivan Bart.

Bart partnered with Harlem’s Fashion Row, the organization that works to increase visibility for multicultural designers, and enlisted British stylist Ibrahim Kamara to create looks head-to-toe inspired by the range of Carter’s designs, dating to her first film, the 1988 blaxploitation parody I’m Gonna Git You Sucka. The result was a group of six vignettes populated by live models and mannequins: Carter’s yellow suit from that film, complete with goldfish shoes, was placed alongside a model wearing Kamara’s modern interpretation of the look in a vignette titled “Fly Guys.”

Mike Coppola/Getty Images for NYFW: The Shows

Other themes ranged from “Women in Protest,” which included Carter’s designs for 1992’s Malcolm X, 1989’s Do The Right Thing and 2015’s Chi-Raq, to “The Bad Boys,” which featured pieces like the Giorgio Armani laser-cut leather coat worn by Samuel L. Jackson as part of Carter’s work in 2000’s Shaft.

A vignette titled “The Hero”  extended beyond a look worn by Chadwick Boseman in Black Pantherto include Carter’s designs for Denzel Washington in Malcolm X and David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King in 2014’s Selma. Kamara took those ideas and created a modern-day LGBTQ freedom fighter in a silk white suit with a printed overcoat.

Mike Coppola/Getty Images for NYFW: The Shows

“Ibrahim is so humble, and he’s a genius,” Carter said. “There were no egos here; we appreciated each other. I know I pushed him and inspired him, and he inspired me with his quiet confidence.”

Of course, that begs the question: Who or what inspires Ruth Carter? You only have to look at her work to know the answer. “Some people think I got into costume design because I love Dior and Chanel and Tom Ford, but it really was these stories of African-American culture, this story of our journey,” she said. “When I started, I didn’t see very much of us, and I really in my heart wanted to tell my stories. Tonight is the result of 30 years of hard, hard work.”

 

 

[“source=hollywoodreporter”]

Acclaimed fashion designer Victoria Cascajo’s home sale sewn up

The East Gippsland home of a late fashion designer whose daring design shocked the White House will be restored to its former glory following its sale.

A Melbourne couple snapped up Victoria Cascajo’s six-bedroom, four-bathroom house at 105 Mathiesons Rd, Eagle Point for an undisclosed price after being wowed by its “magical location”, Elders Real Estate Bairnsdale’s Adam Bloem said.

The 2.5ha property overlooking the Gippsland Lakes, named Riverside, most recently had a $1.4-$1.6 million price guide.

Cascajo designed this daring white dress, worn by Sonia McMahon at a White House dinner hosted by US president Richard Nixon. She accompanied husband William McMahon, then-Australian PM.

Cascajo designed this daring white dress, worn by Sonia McMahon at a White House dinner hosted by US president Richard Nixon. She accompanied husband William McMahon, then-Australian PM.Source:Supplied

Cascajo ran the popular Balencia Couture in Toorak.

Cascajo ran the popular Balencia Couture in Toorak.Source:News Limited

Mr Bloem said the buyers had started a business in East Gippsland and would be moving to the area over the coming months, with plans to rejuvenate the house and its vast gardens.

“They’re looking forward to enjoying this magic location and the surrounding Gippsland Lakes, rivers, beaches and mountains,” he said.

Cascajo owned the property from 2014. She died in 2017.

105 Mathiesons Rd offered striking lake views over a 25m infinity pool.

105 Mathiesons Rd offered striking lake views over a 25m infinity pool.Source:Supplied

Inside the Mediterranean-inspired house.

Inside the Mediterranean-inspired house.Source:Supplied

Her most famous creation was a bold white dress prime minister William McMahon’s wife Sonia wore to a White House state dinner hosted by US president Richard Nixon in 1971.

The full-length gown — with side splits on the bodice and arms, held together by rhinestone bands, and to the upper thigh — was dubbed one of the “most talked-about costumes yet to appear in the White House” by The Washington Post.

The Spanish-born designer also dressed socialites, models and Melbourne Cup attendees from her Toorak-based Balencia Couture, becoming a Stonnington Fashion Hall of Fame inductee.

The entertainer’s kitchen.

The entertainer’s kitchen.Source:Supplied

The property was most recently priced at $1.4-$1.6 million.

The property was most recently priced at $1.4-$1.6 million.Source:Supplied

Her property features a Mediterranean-inspired house with a wraparound veranda, informal and formal living rooms, a large kitchen with a butler’s pantry, a wine cellar and lake views from almost every room.

A 25m infinity pool, self-contained cottage, orchard and vegetable garden were also part of the package.

[“source=news.com.au”]

 

What Does A Broadway Costume Designer Actually Do?

Ethan Hawke and Paul Dano as warring brothers in ‘True West’JOAN MARCUS

In his script for his 1980 play “True West,” Sam Shepard goes to considerable pains to describe how his central characters, two ostensibly very different brothers, are dressed.

Austin, the timid screenwriter, is wearing a light blue sports shirt, light tan cardigan sweater, clean blue jeans and white tennis shoes.

Lee, the older brother, wears a filthy white T-shirt; tattered brown overcoat covered with dust; dark blue baggy suit pants (from the Salvation Army); pink suede belt; scuffed, pointed, black forties dress shoes with holes in the soles; no socks; no hat. That’s not to mention the apparent need for long, pronounced sideburns, Gene Vincent hairdo, beard (two days’ growth) and bad teeth.

Kaye Voyce, the costume designer for the new Roundabout Theatreproduction of “True West,” starring Paul Dano as Austin and Ethan Hawke as Lee, didn’t feel at all limited by Shepard’s seeming specificity. For starters, she has Lee wearing a shiny maroon dress shirt under his tattered coat, at least at first, and gives Austin a pair of glasses.

“I don’t feel like the details he gives are prescriptive,” she says, of Shepard. “To me, they are beautiful clues to the characters and the world, and a great starting place. And those clues will mean different things to each team of designers, directors and actors. The clues helped to remind me to push for the extremes in these humans.”

“If an actor is uncomfortable it’s hard to believe it as a costume”JOAN MARCUS

Voyce describes the art of costume design, in collaboration with the director, actors and other designers, as a kind of “active collage process.” “With more contemporary clothes, it’s all about hunting down the right pieces, being open to surprise and how things are put together,” she says.

“And often, something just feels right or really wrong on someone’s body. If an actor doesn’t feel comfortable in a garment it’s really hard to believe it as a costume. Sometimes you want something to be ill-fit or a little strange—but the actor has to make the connection physically.”

Sometimes, the effect of costume design might be illuminating in a subliminal way. Asked if there was an aspect of her work on “True West” she found personally satisfying, she mentioned an aspect that, first and foremost, served the actors in their performances.

“In our conversations, we realized how central the absence of the father is in the play,” explained Voyce. “There are elements of Lee and Austin’s costumes that relate to their ideas of this man. Nobody should know it, but it means something to me and the actors.”

[“source=forbes”]

Bebe Rexha can’t find a designer to dress her for the red carpet: ‘My size 8 ass is still going to the Grammys’

Bebe Rexha can’t find a designer to dress her for the Grammy Awards next month — because she is “too big.”

The singer, who is nominated in the Best New Artist and Best Country Duo/Group Performance categories, took to social media on Monday to explain her predicament three weeks before music’s big night, revealing she’s struggling to find an outfit.

“A lot of times artists will go and talk to designers, and they’ll make them custom dresses to walk the red carpet…” the Meant to Be star says in a video posted to Instagram. “I had my team hit out a lot of designers, and a lot of them do not want to dress me because I’m too big.

Bebe Rexha attends the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show at Pier 94 on November 8, 2018 in New York City. Theo Wargo/Getty Images

“If a size 6/8 is too big then I don’t know what to tell you. Then I don’t want to wear your fking dresses… To all the people that said that I’m thick… fk you, I don’t want to wear your fking dresses.”

Bebe captioned the video: “Im sorry, I had to get this off my chest. If you don’t like my fashion style or my music that’s one thing. But don’t say you can’t dress someone that isn’t a runway size. We are beautiful any size! Small or large! Anddddd My size 8 a is still going to the Grammys.”

She isn’t the first real-size celebrity to speak out about the red carpet snobbery surrounding designers refusing to dress certain body types — comedian Leslie Jones took aim at the fashionistas when she couldn’t find anyone to dress her for the Ghostbusters premiere in 2016 — she took to Twitter to voice her disdain, writing: “It’s so funny how there are no designers wanting to help me with a premiere dress for movie. Hmmm that will change and I remember everything.”

She refused to name the designers she reached out to, but Christian Siriano stepped forward and offered to dress her, stating: “I love Leslie and can’t wait to make her something fabulous to wear. I dress and support women of all ages and sizes.”

Embedded video

Bebe Rexha

@BebeRexha

Im sorry, I had to get this off my chest. If you don’t like my fashion style or my music that’s one thing. But don’t say you can’t dress someone that isn’t a runway size. We are beautiful any size! Small or large! Anddddd My size 8 ass is still going to the Grammys. #LOVEYOURBODY

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Chinese designer baby creator fired from job, authorities confirm concerning claims

The Chinese doctor who claimed he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies has been fired from his job.

But authorities appear to have confirmed his unpublished claims, which sparked international outrage late last year.

Chinese investigators determined Dr He Jiankui acted on his own and will be punished for any violations of the law, according to state media.

“This behaviour seriously violates ethics and the integrity of scientific research, is in serious violation of relevant national regulations and creates a pernicious influence at home and abroad,” a Xinhua News Agency report said.

IN-DEPTH: Are we creating designer babies, or curing health crises?

Authorities appear to have confirmed Dr He’s claims that he genetically edited embryos. Picture: AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

Authorities appear to have confirmed Dr He’s claims that he genetically edited embryos. Picture: AP Photo/Mark SchiefelbeinSource:AP

His employer, the Southern University of Science and Technology in Shenzhen, said it will “rescind the work contract with Dr Jiankui He and terminate any of his teaching and research activities.”

The controversial doctor made headlines last November after claiming he altered human embryos with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life – resulting in the birth of genetically edited twin girls.

Dr He said his goal was not to cure or prevent an inherited disease, but to try to bestow a trait that few people naturally have — an ability to resist possible future infection with HIV, the AIDS virus.

But investigators in the southern province of Guangdong determined Dr He organised and handled funding for the experiment without outside assistance in violation of national guidelines, the Xinhua News Agency said on Monday.

There has been no independent verification of his claim, and it has not yet been published, although Dr He gave details at an international gene editing conference in Hong Kong. Some have even speculated that it could be a hoax.

But the Chinese investigation appears to confirm it. The Xinhua report says the twins and those involved in the second pregnancy will remain under medical observation with regular visits supervised by government health departments.

“It does sound like they have confirmed the existence of the babies,” said Dr Kiran Musunuru, a genetics journal editor from the University of Pennsylvania who reviewed materials Dr He provided at the AP’s request.

Given that the Chinese investigation alleged ethical lapses, Dr He’s work might not be published by a scientific journal, but “the information needs to be made available so we know exactly what was done,” Musunuru said.

“It could be as simple as putting it on the web.”

Gene editing for reproductive purposes is effectively banned in the US and most of Europe. Picture: AP/Mark Schiefelbein

Gene editing for reproductive purposes is effectively banned in the US and most of Europe. Picture: AP/Mark SchiefelbeinSource:AP

Along with the birth of the twins, another embryo yet to be born reportedly resulted from his experiment.

In 2017, Dr He, then little-known, attended a meeting in Berkeley, California, where scientists and ethicists were discussing a technology that had shaken the field to its core — an emerging tool for “editing” genes, the strings of DNA that form the blueprint of life.

He embraced the tool, called CRISPR, and last year rocked an international conference with the claim that he had helped make the world’s first gene-edited babies, despite a clear scientific consensus that making genetic changes that could be passed to future generations should not be attempted at this point.

China called an immediate halt to Dr He’s experiments following his announcement.

Dr He said his goal was to try to bestow a trait that few people naturally have — an ability to resist possible future infection with HIV. Picture: Anthony Wallace/AFP

Dr He said his goal was to try to bestow a trait that few people naturally have — an ability to resist possible future infection with HIV. Picture: Anthony Wallace/AFPSource:AFP

Gene editing for reproductive purposes is effectively banned in the US and most of Europe.

In China, ministerial guidelines prohibit embryo research that “violates ethical or moral principles.”

The chief of the World Health Organisation said last year his agency is assembling experts to consider the health impact of gene editing.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said gene editing “cannot be just done without clear guidelines” and experts should “start from a clean sheet and check everything.”

“We have a big part of our population who say, ‘Don’t touch,’” Tedros told reporters. “We have to be very, very careful, and the working group will do that.”

[“source=news.com.au”]

The Home Front: Designer Tom Chung advocates for the humble coffee table

Far from going out of favour, the humble coffee table is experiencing its day in the sun, says Vancouver-bred, Toronto-based industrial designer Tom Chung, who launches his new Plank collection at design show IDS Toronto this weekend.

The collection is designed in collaboration with modern furniture company EQ3.

Chung’s first thought, when asked to create a large coffee table with enclosed storage, was to avoid the big bulky coffee table in the middle of the living room scenario.

“They can often be very clunky,” he says. “And if you have a coffee table in a room with a media console, you don’t want to be overwhelmed with blocks of furniture.”

Chung says coffee tables are being used more than ever, particularly in small spaces, where people don’t have the luxury of large dining tables and are spending more time in their common living areas.

“Living in a small apartment in Toronto, it’s actually the most important piece of furniture I own,” he says. “We don’t even use our dining table any more; we just eat on our coffee table. I think everything’s become more casual and so coffee tables are more important than they were previously.”

Chung followed a specific design brief in creating the Plank collection, he says, which was to design a “collection of closed storage”. It includes a media console, a coffee table in three different sizes and a side table.

He says all the pieces have a “universal door size”, so people can customize their orders. The doors, for example, can be ordered in a range of fun upholstered colours, which EQ3 is known for, or with slats, and are available in oak or walnut.

“We really wanted the collection to have a universal appeal,” Chung says. “The version that has slats is perhaps a bit more traditional, but then also having the opportunity to add more contemporary colours with the fabrics and things like that.”

“When I was building the model and doing the rendering, the oak is what I saw it in, although the walnut is also nice, and suits a different customer.”

On first glance, the collection seems to have a slight Japanese esthetic and lightness about it. Chung says he was reading a Japanese book on colour combinations and colour blocking early on in his design process, “and that sort of became how you see the panels in the doors, especially with two sets, you can mix and match colours if you want to.”

Ultimately, though, he says he “wanted to make something really architectural that was an open platform for people to hide stuff away, but also display certain stuff, and be able to fade into the back of a room”.

“Especially when furniture becomes that large,” he says, “you don’t want it to be imposing a certain style; you kind of want it to be in the background.”

Chung graduated from Emily Carr University of Art + Design in 2012, and moved to Toronto that same year to take up a job at home design and manufacturing company Umbra. He designs lighting, furniture, interiors and exhibitions, currently doing an “experimental ceramics” creative residency at Banff Centre for the Arts + Creativity.

Added to this, Chung has also designed a lamp for Scandinavian company Muuto, which was launched in September and will be available in North America in the next few weeks, and a lighting collection for Danish company Menu with fellow designer Jordan Murphy that also launches this month.

When asked what he’d most like to achieve in the year ahead, the busy designer replied:

“I hope to do more independent projects.”

[“source=vancouversun”]