Oprah Winfrey’s Sabyasachi Connection, As Revealed By The Designer

Oprah Winfrey's Sabyasachi Connection, As Revealed By The Designer

On Monday, ace fashion designer Sabyasachi Mukherjee revealed that actress-talk show host Oprah Winfrey recently wore a custom-made black sari designed by him on the cover of Elle India’s December 2018 edition. Oprah has featured on the magazine’s 22nd anniversary cover. She complemented the sari with 29.5 carats Zambian emerald and diamond earrings from Sabyasachi’s heritage jewellery collection. A picture of the cover was shared by Sabyasachi on his Instagram timeline, who also revealed details about his meeting with Oprah Winfrey on her first trip to India. She had visited India in 2012 and while attending a dinner hosted by the royal family in Jaipur, Oprah Winfrey had also worn a sari designed by Sabyasachi.

“Nothing prepares you for meeting Oprah in real life. On her maiden trip to India, Oprah attended a dinner hosted by the royal family in Jaipur and I had the good fortune to dress her in a saree for it. We spent some time discussing India and spirituality, as well as Indian art and handicrafts,” Sabyasachi wrote.

On her way to the Jaipur Literary Festival, Oprah Winfrey had visited Sabyasachi’s new store in Mumbai too. “The opening of my store in Kala Ghoda came up in conversation and Oprah promised to swing by in the morning if she got time off from her busy schedule. I thought she was being polite. Oprah isn’t just one of the world’s most influential personalities. She’s larger than life, but also as real as it gets!” Sabyasachi added.

[“source=ndtv”]

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer – No, It’s Not Sabyasachi

New Pic Of Deepika Padukone From Wedding Festivities Shared By Designer - No, It's Not Sabyasachi

 

After Sabyasachi and The House Of Angadi, Deepika Padukone picked an outfit from the shelves of Anamika Khanna for one of her wedding functions. The designer shared an image of Deepika with her family on her Instagram page and used ‘#weddingfestivities’ in the caption (now edited out) but she did not give away the details of event. In the picture, Deepika Padukone, dressed in an organza outfit, smiled as she hugged her family (in a very Hum Saath-Saath Hain style). Deepika’s sister Anisha, dressed in a chikankari anarkali, looked pretty. Deepika Padukone married actor Ranveer Singh in Italy earlier this month in the presence of their families and close friends. The couple is gearing up for their first Mumbai reception scheduled for November 28.

Anamika Khanna is the third designer Deepika Padukone opted for her wedding festivities, first being her favoured designer Sabyasachi. Deepika also wore a pure zari kanjeevaram saree in gold for the reception, which was a gift by her mother Ujjala Padukone from The House of Angadi. Deepika’s orange and gold saree for the Konkani wedding was also from The House of Angadi.

[“source=ndtv”]

How Designer Marcelo Burlon County of Milan Developed A Mature Collaboration With Muhammad Ali

Marcelo Burlon  photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Whether drawn by splendid designs or heartfelt recollections, or the curiosity of what will be the next big thing, streetwear has  proudly proven its sustainability in a volatile fashion marketplace. Make no bones about it, streetwear is meant to be enjoyed and experienced in the proper fashion. Rich textures and hues mesmerize the consumers with waves of exotic yet familiar styles. Streetwear is street fashion that saw its humble beginnings take root in California’s surf and skate culture. Since then, it has grown to encompass elements of hip-hop fashion, Japanese street fashion, and lately modern haute couture fashion. Streetwear more than often centers on more relaxed pieces such as jeans, baseball caps, hoodies and sneakers.

Nevertheless, let me be clear; streetwear was born in the USA. Throughout history, the USA has played a significantly creative role in fashion and quite often we don’t give ourselves a good pat on the back for our creative developments on fashions timeline of history. The movement is born out of the Los Angeles surf culture of the late 1970s and early 1980s. Even if we look as legendary surfboard designer Shawn Stussy, you’ll find that he began selling printed T-shirts featuring the same trademark signature he used on his custom surfboards. At first, he was selling the Stussy items from his own car. Soon thereafter he expanded sales to boutiques once popularity has increased and Stussy had become a household name. To be clear, the two most important components of streetwear is T-shirts and exclusivity. Early streetwear brands took inspiration from the DIY aesthetic of punk, new wave, heavy metal and later hip hop cultures. Subsequently. well-known sportswear and fashion brands attached themselves to the emerging early 1980s hip hop scene such as Kangol and Adidas. At this point, the game just got interesting. Nike’s signing of soon-to-be basketball superstar Michael Jordan from their  rival Adidas in 1984 changed the game altogether, as Nike now dominated the urban streetwear sneaker market in the late 80’s and early 90’s.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Moving forward, we witnessed brand launches by the chief executives of major record companies with then heavyweights Russell Simmons of Def Jam launching his Phat Farm label, Sean Combs of Bad Boy with Sean John, and Jay-Z and Damon Dash of Roc-a-Fella Records launching Rocawear.  Years later, even rap superstar 50 Cent launched his G-Unit clothing label, with the sneaker rights given to Reebok.  This simply meant that the big fashion companies not only  saw a future in streetwear but rather  embraced the streetwear culture. So where does this leave streetwear now? Recently, we find an increase in established luxury brands entering into the market. Last year, Louis Vuitton proudly named Virgil Abloh (Off-White brand) as the brand menswear creative director. So then, what really popularized the streetwear trend? In a word, the decline of formal wear led to the rise of streetwear fashion. I recently reviewed a streetwear designer brand that peaked my interest.

Marcelo Burlon photo by @bratislavtasicMarcel Burlon

Marcelo Burlon was born in Argentinia. His approach to fashion has caught the attention of new generations on his very own rainbow tour of the social-media era. Moving with his parents to Porto Potenza Picena in Italy at 14, he would become a notorious club kid in Rimini. That was until a career organizing events for major fashion houses and DJ-ing relocated him to Milan in 2012 and paved the way for the launch of his streetwear brand Marcelo Burlon County of Milan. Five years on, he has become a fan phenomenon in Italy and beyond, and the poster boy for a new wave of fashion entrepreneurs who are set on challenging the establishment.

[“source=forbes]

Fashion Friday: BART Edition

Image result for Fashion Friday: BART Edition

Talia, a multimedia staffer, ventures into BART to find some of the latest fashion trends for this weeks episode of Fashion Friday.

[“source=ndtv”]

Sustainable Fashion Searches Surged In 2018

Story image for Sustainable Fashion Searches Surged In 2018 from Forbes

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brand

Think of your most recent clothing purchase: do you know where it was manufactured, whether the people who made it were treated fairly, whether any animals were harmed or the environmental impact of its production?

Though most people couldn’t answer these questions, there’s an increasing proportion of consumers that are becoming conscious of what they’re buying.

Ethical spending now accounts for £81.3 billion of the UK retail market, according to Ethical Consumer, and KPMG’s latest annual retail survey noted that almost 20% of shoppers were drawn to retailers that they know ethically source their goods.

Although high street brands such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

s such as H&M and Zara have launched conscious lines, shoppers who are clued up on sustainability are growing frustrated with fast fashion brands who only dip into the ethical retail world.

Instead, these are three retailers who provide conscious consumers with a huge selection of clothes, accessories and more, all of which is produced ethically and sustainably.

Gather & See

Every ethical shopper is different: one might care more about the workers behind the products; another might be concerned about buying only environmentally-friendly items.

[“source=forbes]

Louis Vuitton

“We are the world.” Trust Virgil Abloh to pinpoint an incredibly apt, multi-resonating, globally inclusive title for his debut at Louis Vuitton menswear. The levels of that clever reference—running from Michael Jackson and Lionel Richie’s 1985 charity single in support of Ethiopian famine relief, through the power source of Afro-cultural creativity in music and style, to the activation of the narrative of an international luxury powerhouse brand—were impressive to contemplate, even before the show kicked off. As the sun shone down on the gardens of the Palais Royal, the significance of his central visual metaphor, the rainbow, also sank in. All colors, all nationalities, all identities, and generations welcome here, it said.

Say what you like about Abloh’s qualifications as a fashion designer—he didn’t go to fashion school, he’s accused of appropriating others’ work, all this sort of thing—the overarching role of any leader in office today (fashion, corporate, or political) is to set a tone, personally. In such a divisive, social media–bitchy time, Abloh’s humble-smart, personal-friendly communication skills are of a caliber that can bring people with him. As he faced the biggest test of his credibility today, he deftly set the mood to happiness—that, and a demonstration that, resources unlimited, he can be a bridge between the perceived divide between democratic aspirations and the output at the top of the citadel.

To detail. His starting point, he said in a pre-show interview at LV headquarters, was the idea of white light hitting a prism, and dividing into its component colors. The personal symbolism—his identity as a designer of his own brand, Off-White—was exercised, classily transmuted into the opening look: a tailored suit with a double-breasted blazer and fluid two-pleat trousers. This being an accessory house, all eyes zoomed to bag and shoes: a matte white crocodile tote and trainers. It reassured, and confirmed. The tide is turning toward hip tailoring—there’s been no such thing for way too long. Plus, he’s analyzed the fine art of twisting a classic accessory just enough to make it coolly desirable. In his show notes, he’d noted it as a precise formula, “3%.”

He met the challenge of designing for what is essentially a luxury accessories company by merging bags, wallets, and card holders into hybrid garments—holsters, harnesses, protective zippered vests. Somewhere along the way, these layerings became reminiscent of Helmut Lang’s ’90s canon of design: the casual with the formal, the sense of a calmly empowered gang of friends, a new generation coming into its own.

In 2018, that’s the spirit here. His casting of friends—there were maps, setting out their truly diverse roots in the program notes—celebrated that. In the end, though, the magic of this revolution was nothing confrontational. It even had a romantic, whimsical thread: the rainbow trope leading back to the notion of The Wizard of Oz. There was a print of Dorothy, lying in a bed of roses, beaded embroideries of the friends on the yellow brick road. In this sense, fully felt by Abloh as he came out, overwhelmed, to take his bow, it’s an American dream come true. The last look was a metallic silver poncho with “Follow the Yellow Brick” written on a breast patch. When he posted a picture of that moment on his Instagram, the caption read, “You can do it too.”

[“source=vogue”]

Aishwarya slips and almost falls at Deepika-Ranveer reception. Shweta comes to her rescue

(L-R) Shweta Bachchan Nanda, Jaya Bachchan and Aishwraya Rai Bachchan. Photo: Yogen Shah

Deepika Padukone and Ranveer Singh’s Mumbai reception on December 1 night was a starry, starry affair. The who’s who of Bollywood turned up dressed in the best of their attires and made sure the party was a night to remember. Newlyweds Deepika and Ranveer partied with their Hindi film industry colleagues till the wee hours of the morning.

Deepika and Ranveer hosted the third of their receptions last night and it was a full house (except for a few who were not invited to the party).

The Bachchans arrived at the party and posed for photos in front of the lenses.

Amitabh Bachchan, along with wife Jaya, daughter Shweta Bachchan Nanda and daughter-in-law Aishwarya Rai Bachchan attended the event last evening. Abhishek Bachchan was not at the event.

While it was a mostly uneventful an evening, while entering the photo-op area, Aishwarya Rai Bachchan stumbled and nearly fell. Sister-in-law Shweta caught Aishwarya’s hand and rescued her from the awkward situation.

[“source=indiatoday]

Could social media emerge as a new critical infrastructure sector?

Social media has become an important conduit for official and emergency government communications with the public. With such communications having the power to critically affect national security, social networks have become a hacker’s paradise and need to be taken more seriously.

US President Donald Trump’s official Twitter account is one example of how social media is now a popular channel for engaging with the public in realtime. At the more extreme end of the scale, recent events in Hawaii and Japan saw false missile alerts sent due to human error, causing populations to spiral into turmoil. These incidents highlight how social media accounts are becoming part of the critical infrastructure that governs our day-to-day lives.

It’s clear that communications, or mis-communications, of this kind have the potential to wreak havoc. But the question is: should the use of these social media accounts — like Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and more — for official and emergency purposes, be regulated by legislation?

“Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.”

In Australia, telecommunications carriers are subject to the Telecommunications Sector Security Reforms (TSSR), while other critical infrastructure falls under the recently introduced Security of Critical Infrastructure Act (2018). This act is primarily focused on major infrastructure assets like power and water, that supply essential services to more than 100,000 people.

In both the TSSR and the act, scope is given for the relevant minister to direct a provider or intermediary “to do, or not do, a specified thing that is reasonably necessary to protect networks and facilities from national security risks.”

Under the Security of Critical Infrastructure Act, the relevant minister can also nominate additional industry centres for inclusion, provided the minister is satisfied there is a risk that the assets or services could have a prejudicial effect on national security.

Top of the priority list currently are airports and data centres. It’s possible the minister will declare social media communications as subject to the act, but, at this stage, it’s unlikely.

Top-grade cybersecurity practices essential

So, what should governments be doing when it comes to securing social media accounts used for timely or sensitive communications? Until these platforms are officially treated as critical infrastructure, we should consider applying the same cybersecurity practices followed by the energy, water, gas and ports industries.

Government personnel operating social media for official or emergency purposes should undertake a review of how their accounts are managed. Hardening communication platforms should include stepping up password management practices. This will help eliminate the chance of delays to the delivery of critical information or the exploitation of accounts for nefarious purposes, such as issuing false or misleading information.

“To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged.”

Hackers know the value and vulnerability of social media today, and are already hijacking official accounts. In 2017, a rogue Twitter employee shut down Donald Trump’s Twitter account for 11 minutes in an act of protest.

Disgruntled employees aren’t the only risk – hackers could use any one of several social engineering techniques, such as phishing, to gain access to passwords for social media. If they did so, they’d be able to issue false statements on a public social media account, potentially causing fear and panic.

Government personnel within specific departments or offices commonly share access to social media accounts. This means that potentially dozens of people throughout an agency have access, admin or editing rights on these platforms. Not least, passwords for these accounts are usually shared between team members, rarely changed, and often re-used across a number of accounts.

Any account with a shared or re-used password can be an easy target for a hacker or corrupt insider. There is also rarely a record of which team member published each post — increasing the possibility of a false alert being deliberate and untraceable.

Just two minutes after the missile alert was issued on Twitter in Hawaii, the governor was told it was a false alarm. While other government officials rushed to assure the public there was nothing to worry about, the governor did not tweet for more than 17 minutes. The cause of his silence? He forgot his username and password.

To strengthen these platforms against both external and internal attacks by unauthorised personnel, government departments should treat their social media accounts as privileged. That way, simple acts of forgetting, sharing or re-using passwords won’t cause delays, such as what happened in Hawaii.

Privileged account security tips

As best practice to properly secure and protect social media accounts, government departments should employ privileged account security, including:

  • Arrange transparent access: To make it harder for hackers to find and exploit credentials, authorised users must be able to seamlessly authenticate access to an account without having to remember passwords. This allows for immediate access in emergency situations, such as the incident in Hawaii.
  • Remove shared credentials: Use a digital vault to store passwords and remove the accountability challenges of shared logins. Users will then need to login individually for access to shared social media platforms.
  • Automate password rotations: Continuously changing privileged credentials safeguards against attackers using retired passwords. Regularly automating password changes can also update access privileges, reducing the possibility of an outsider getting their hands on valid credentials.
  • Review account activity: For visibility of individual users’ activity across social media accounts, a record of events can be created. This way, posts can be linked to authorised users, and rogue employees can be more easily identified.

Governments the world over are reviewing their critical infrastructure safeguards and national security precautions. As we continue to see in situations such as those in the US, Hawaii, and Japan, the public has developed a huge level of trust in communications distributed by government organisations.

Social media has become a credible and dependable medium for official communications, and it’s clear these platforms are neither inherently secure nor infallible. It’s critical to re-think how any medium used for official and emergency communications is treated and secured.

[“source=cnbc”]

Fashion: Linger longer in leather

Lisa Hahnbueck, a fashion blogger wears a Chloe dress; Nina Dobrev, centre, a Bulgarian actress in lemon and Claire Foy, right, in a Rosetta Getty shift dress

The fashion elite have a hot new look, and it’s hot in every sense. Leather dresses, once just for hotel bedrooms or Hallowe’en, are the next big thing, and designers want you wearing one in the daytime.

The LDD — leather day dress — was one of the most popular items on the catwalks for autumn-winter 2018. Instead of the flesh-flashing fits of the va-va-voom variety, these dresses are designed with structured shapes, roomy fits and utilitarian pockets and collars.

[“source=forbes]

Designer babies: Indian scientists question implications of gene editing

Several research labs across India are using CRISPR, the gene editing tool used by He Jiankui to create the designer babies, to correct mutations in genetic disorders. Photo: Bloomberg

Several research labs across India are using CRISPR, the gene editing tool used by He Jiankui to create the designer babies, to correct mutations in genetic disorders. Photo: Bloomberg

New Delhi: Scientists in India are deeply divided over the implications of the recent shock announcement about gene-edited “designer” babies made by a Chinese scientist. The responses range from disbelief about the research to potential implications for next-generation science. On Monday, He Jiankui, a scientist from China, presented his findings at a genome summit in Hong Kong claiming to have created the world’s first gene-edited twins. Jiankui edited a gene in the embryo and implanted it in the mother’s womb to make the babies resistant to HIV infection. The twin girls were delivered last month, he said.

“He created a next-generation baby, which almost falls in the purview of designer babies. It sets a wrong precedent. Creating a child with specific traits or deciding how the next generation will be could open the technology for potential misuse by those who have the tools, funds and necessary resources,” said senior scientist Debojyoti Chakroborty from CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology (IGIB), Delhi, “It was definitely not the necessity at the moment,” he added.

Several research laboratories across India are using gene-editing tool CRISPR to correct mutations in genetic disorders like sickle cell anaemia and haemophilia by isolating embryonic stem cells derived from patients, trying to establish preclinical studies and examining if these can be used for therapy. Some are doing basic research on CRISPR, while others are engaged in identifying genes in plant and animal genomes after knockout or knock-in of a gene to study their function and impact.

Ever since its discovery in 2012, consensus has prevailed among international scientists not to use CRISPR for editing embryos, until it is proven to be completely safe. However, research by the Chinese scientist, which is yet to be published in any journal, or ‘peer-reviewed’, has set the alarm bells ringing on its future consequences, especially when the research in the domain is on at an exponential rate.

Girish Sahni, former director-general, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), who is credited with developing India’s first indigenous clot-buster drug for cardiovascular diseases, said, “The technology is fairly developed to reap awards. But the focus should be on its monitoring and ensuring strict guidelines to regulate its use.”

That said, Sahni is excited about the potential. “Gene-editing is a powerful tool. India has already lost precious time and it is yet to make any breakthrough in this domain. We should immediately work out modalities by which the research in this area can be conducted, but it should be tied to societal needs, especially agriculture, where it has the maximum scope. We can improve the quality of livestock and agriculture products.”

Plant geneticist, Imran Siddiqui from the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), says the technology offers a big advantage. “If you mutate one gene, it does not cause any evident change in the plant or organism, because the function of that one gene is taken over by a related gene. But, CRISPR offers the advantage of targeting multiple members of the gene family for mutations in just one go, to show visible consequences,” he said.

The underlying concerns are more on the validity of the current research, risk assessment and safety, and ethics as it is believed that the edited embryo could become more vulnerable to other infections. “It is shrouded in mystery. It will take several years to understand how safe it is,” said Chakroborty.

Scientists also contend that there are more pressing disorders that could have been taken up for research.

“It is indeed the ‘therapy of the future’, be it cancer biology and neurodegenerative diseases. If we can isolate the defective genes, it opens up huge applications for disease-control. But, there is still a long way to go. We are taking the first few steps,” said Amitava Sengupta, senior scientist from CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (IICB), Kolkata.

[“source=gsmarena”]